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Results 26 - 50 of 65,570
26. Their first (Arno) Schmidt

       I've mentioned the exhibit, Arno Schmidt: Eine Ausstellung in 100 Stationen that's currently at the Akademie der Künste and which sounds like a great overview of the author -- and I remind you that today at 20:00 is the panel on Mein erster Schmidt, as Dietmar Dath, Reinhard Jirgl, Kathrin Röggla, Ingo Schulze, and Uwe Timm talk about their first encounters with Arno Schmidt's work.

       (A reminder, too, that if you can't make it, or need your own introduction to Schmidt, you might want to turn to my Arno Schmidt: a centennial colloquy, conveniently available at Amazon.com, or on Kindle, or at Amazon.co.uk, etc. etc.)

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27. 10 things you may not know about our Moon

Throughout history, the influence of the full Moon on humans and animals has featured in folklore and myths. Yet it has become increasingly apparent that many organisms really are influenced indirectly, and in some cases directly, by the lunar cycle. Here are ten things you may not know concerning the way the Moon affects life on Earth.

The post 10 things you may not know about our Moon appeared first on OUPblog.

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28. NYCC’15: Preview Afternoon Wednesday!

In the past, ICv2 would normally host their industry conference on the Wednesday before New York Comic Con. I would arrive early, post photos of the preparation, and then listen to the experts talk about how to sell more comics. This year, it’s been replaced with a cocktail hour and white paper on Thursday. So […]

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29. Rachel Pinnelas is named Dynamite’s Associate Editor

Dynamite named Rachel Pinnelas as a new addition to the company’s editorial team. Pinnelas is joining the publisher as an Associate Editor. She will oversee Dynamite-owned, licensed and creator-owned projects. Pinnelas will be editing Red Sonja, Dejah Thoris, and Vampirella, and as of yet unannounced projects. She also edited the Swords of Sorrow crossover series. “I am very […]

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30. NYCC ’15: Food specials from cookies to cones

As you may have noticed, the tendrils of NYCC and Super Week are everywhere, including a variety of food specials from some fine eateries around the city. I attended a preview of these foodstuffs — which are available now through the 11th — last week and could only sample a few because diet, but here’s […]

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31. Review: Axcend #1 Game On

Axcend from Image comics smashes two different story telling worlds together, but is it worth pushing start?

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32. Seeking character studies from Canadian writers

Online literary journal and small press Pictures and Portraits (Toronto) seeks experimental prose and character studies from Canadian writers. Accept fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Length: 2500 words or less. Deadline: Ongoing. Guidelines.

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33. NYCC ’15: Maris Wicks on Self-Care, Poop Jokes, and “Human Body Theater”

The Beat sneaks in an early NYCC interview with the one and only Maris Wicks to chat about her new educational science comic from First Second: "Human Body Theater"!

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34. Emma Watson live Q&A This Friday!

Emma Watson has just tweeted that she will be a part of a live Q&A (over Twitter), discussing her new movie RegressionAs previously reported, Emma Watson plays a tormented young woman who fears for her life after experiencing something horrific. According to IMDB, Emma Watson’s character accuses her father of a crime he does not remember committing.


The Live Q+A will take place 9 am LA Time and 5 pm UK Time.


Screen Shot 2015-10-07 at 4.39.32 PM

The trailer for Regression can be seen below:

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35. David Lloyd and Aces Weekly–the new frontier of comics

by Nicky Wheeler-Nicholson David Lloyd is known for his innovative creativity drawing V for Vendetta along with writer Alan Moore. David’s use of the Guy Fawkes mask for the main character has become a political archetype that has gone far beyond the comic. In person David is a lovely man who is passionate about his art. It’s […]

1 Comments on David Lloyd and Aces Weekly–the new frontier of comics, last added: 10/7/2015
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36. NYCC’15: Exploring the Deserted Aisles Before the Show Opens

In case you missed it, the floor planner for New York Comic Con is active! I reported on the biggest surprise earlier, but now, let’s take a leisurely stroll, virtually, through the exhibit hall and Artist Alley! The overview: Almost all of the space is rented. Next to Marriott [sic], there is Booth 755, a […]

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37. NYCC’15: Getting Around

Here’s the map of the area: If you’re on the subway, take the 7 train to Hudson Yards/34th Street. If you want to beat the crowds out of that station, stand in the front two cars of the train. If you need an elevator, then you’ll have to walk along the mezzanine to the far […]

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38. Dark Horse releases official word on Moebius Library

Following yesterday's leak of embargoed press materials, Dark Horse has released official word of their Moebius reprint plans, with confirmation that it's being done in conjunction with Isabelle Giraud, Moebius's widow. DH had previously reprinted some of the materials, so doubtless this prior prelationship helped get this much sought after license.

6 Comments on Dark Horse releases official word on Moebius Library, last added: 10/8/2015
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39. NYCC ’15- Podcorn Podcast’s Con Survival Guide

Every Wednesday, I sit down with Brandon Montclare, writer of the hit Image series Rocket Girl and co-writer of Marvel’s upcoming Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur series.  We gab about what we’re reading now, what books we consider classics (Brandon loves Dark Knight Strikes Again…), and the hottest gossip of the industry.  Oh, and sometimes the inimitable artist Amy Reeder (Rocket Girl, Batwoman) stops […]

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40. NYCC ’15: Viz panels, exclusives and ninja activities

We’ve already told you about all the Naruto/Masashi Mishimoto excitement at this year’s NYCC, but VIz has some other stuff planned, as well, including a NARUTO Ninja mission at Booth #1346 — pick up your stealth headband at the booth and go on a special mission around the show floor. Also exclusives: Exclusive NARUTO items!  […]

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41. Dark Horse digital single issues now available on five new platforms

After years of releasing their digital comics via through their own app, Dark Horse has finally announced that all their comics will be available on Comixology, as well as four other platforms, including Kindle, Google Play, iBooks, and the Nook. It's an expansive expansion and marks a very smart move for Dark Horse: there is really no upside to limiting digital distribution these days, and the multi=platform war was won long ago. All releases will be released simultaneously in print and digital. In June Dark Horse made its graphic novel line-up available via Comxiology and according to publisher Mike Richardson, “the sales have been incredible.”

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42. Bare bodkins and sparsely clothed buttinskis, or, speaking daggers but using none

Few people would today have remembered the word bodkin if it had not occurred in the most famous of Hamlet’s monologues. Chaucer was the earliest author in whose works bodkin occurred. At its appearance, it had three syllables and a diphthong in the root, for it was spelled boidekin. The suffix -kin suggested to John Minsheu, our first English etymologist (1617), that he was dealing with a Dutch noun.

The post Bare bodkins and sparsely clothed buttinskis, or, speaking daggers but using none appeared first on OUPblog.

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43. Compassion or compromise? The ethics of assisted suicide

“Death is inevitable, but suffering doesn't have to be,” says Tennessee native John Jay Hooker, who has devoted his life to fighting for civil liberties, and his deadly cancer hasn't stood in his way.

The post Compassion or compromise? The ethics of assisted suicide appeared first on OUPblog.

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44. One more day until the Nobel Prize in Literature announcement

       The Nobel Prize in Literature will be announced tomorrow, at 13:00 local time (Stockholm); you'll be able to watch the announcement live at the Nobel site.
       The Swedish Academy decides who gets the prize, and its (new) permanent secretary, Sara Danius, will make the announcement. (Oddly enough, they've just announced that Danius has received a literary prize -- the Gerard Bonniers essäpris; the SEK 100,000 isn't exactly Nobel-money, but it ain't bad. Former permanent secretary Horace Engdahl also won this, in 2010, a year after he had stepped down as permanent secretary.)

       Most of the media coverage takes the betting-lists as starting (and ending) point -- so, for example, we have Camille Bas-Wolhert's AFP report (here at Yahoo), The tough task of predicting a Nobel literature laureate, noting that: "The real experts are usually reluctant to make a prediction".
       In one of the more interesting variations on that, Christian Lorentzen admits to actually betting on the Nobel (and other literary prizes) -- and even finds he's: "still in the black" thanks to his Alice Munro punt -- in explaining My Book-Prize Betting Addiction: A User's Guide to Making Money Off Alice Munro. He has a system -- "I tend to make three categories of bet: (1) a likely winner; (2) a writer I really admire who's also a patriotic favorite; (3) a writer I've reviewed negatively" -- which sounds as good as any. (He also thinks Lyudmila Ulitskaya is a "more likely Russophone winner" than current betting-favorite Svetlana Alexievich.)
       In Svenska Dagbladet they offer a list of 12 heta kandidater för litteraturpriset -- most of whom are among the betting favorites, while Folkbladet gets a few wider-ranging suggestions (though Alexievich is also the most often mentioned name).

       Blogger-speculation includes:

       And extensive discussion continues at:        As to those in the discussion, I don't really have all that much to add, but here a few observations regarding some of them:
  • Svetlana Alexievich: is the betting favorite -- down to 3/1 at Ladbrokes as I write this. With pretty much only her Voices from Chernobyl to go on, English-speaking readers might find it hard to judge her (or see what the fuss is about), but it's worth remembering that she is big in Sweden -- a pile of her books have been published there in recent years -- and that her distinctive literary approach (documentary, basically) is a (perhaps welcome ?) change from the usually honored forms. (The prize almost never has gone to a non-fiction author, but the case for her is pretty good.) Throw in the politics -- she's from Belarus, and her critical stance is of the sort that seems to appeal to the Academy -- and the fact that she's a woman (people apparently do keep count, and Danius has mentioned the sex-imbalance among previous winners) and you have a lot of good reasons why they might give it to her. On the other hand, her (relative) overexposure in Sweden the past year or two might suggest it's just her high visibility that's making her all the rage among the bettors.

  • Jon Fosse: was much-discussed last year already, and as an immensely popular playwright (yeah, that doesn't really register in the US/UK, but elsewhere he is, really) as well as novelist is a plausible candidate too. On the other hand, the fact that he's Scandinavian probably doesn't help -- they're probably pretty cautious about giving it to the local authors. I could see them giving it to him -- but I'd be disappointed if he were selected over fellow Norwegian Dag Solstad.

  • Murakami Haruki: has been mentioned as a favorite for years now, but he probably also elicits the most opposition too, considered too lightweight for the Nobel. I think his output is varied and interesting enough to merit consideration, and I wouldn't be shocked if he won, but the Swedish Academy may well be holding out for a slightly weightier Japanese author to give the prize to (though you have to wonder who might be on the horizon -- perhaps A True Novel-author Mizumura Minae, whose attitude towards Japanese literature (which one might sum up as anti-Murakami; see The Fall of Language in the Age of English) might be exactly the sort of thing the Academy is looking for).

  • Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o: well, I've been saying for years Ngũgĩ would/should get the prize, and can still think of no good reason why he shouldn't. You can argue politics regarding some of his work, but I can't imagine that's really much of an issue, and given what he's written, as well as everything else (he's from Africa, writes in Gikuyu, has written significant non-fiction) I'm just surprised they haven't gotten around to giving him the prize yet. Not that that means they'll get around to it this year, but he still seems the obvious choice.

  • Philip Roth: I would be terribly disappointed if they gave it to someone who has stopped writing, as Roth claims he has. Not that he isn't deserving, but they had their chances to reward him and didn't, and I hope that ship has sailed.

  • Amos Oz, Adonis, and Peter Handke: might all be worthy winners -- some more than others -- but all already have piles of awards (indeed have been piling them on in the past few years) and at the same time can't get away from all sorts of controversies, including most recently the fuss about it being announced Adonis was to receive the Erich-Maria-Remarque-Peace Prize. While these choices might be defensible, you really have to wonder whether or not the Swedish Academy wants quite as much fuss as selecting one of them would kick up.

  • Ismail Kadare: has also been in the running seemingly forever, and also would be a bit controversial; still, he seems more likely than any from the Oz/Adonis/Handke group.

  • John Banville: has also received a ton of prizes recently, but I have my doubts that the Swedish Academy wants to honor a very European author who also dabbles in mysteries (as Banville does as Benjamin Black).

  • Krasznahorkai László: I'm warming to the idea of a Krasznahorkai win, but can't imagine this is his year -- the Swedish Academy surely doesn't want to follow the Man Booker International Prize so closely. (This won't be a problem in future years, since they're changing that from an author- to a book-prize.)

  • Joyce Carol Oates, Don DeLillo, Cormac McCarthy, Lydia Davis, Thomas Pynchon, and Marilynne Robinson: are the more or less usual American names tossed in the mix. Yes, they haven't given it to someone from the US in quite a while -- but I can't really see any of them getting it, for a variety of reasons (including simply too much variety (Oates) or relatively too little (Robinson). If anyone has a chance I suppose it might be DeLillo, but I can't really see it

  • Maryse Condé and César Aira: are new names on the betting lists -- something always worth a closer look. Both were also in the Man Booker International Prize running ... which is probably also one of the reasons their names have surfaced, and I don't rate either one's chances very highly.
       And, of course, there are the names that aren't on the lists -- Mahmoud Dowlatabadi, for one, who I would wish was among the favorites.
       If it were up to me I'd have the choice down to one between Ngũgĩ, Dowlatabadi, and the similarly deserving Juan Goytisolo -- but as to what the Swedish Academy might have up their sleeve, I really don't know .....
       Well, there are a few more hours left for speculation ..... Read the rest of this post

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45. Prix Goncourt (less-)longlist

       The prix Goncourt -- the top French book prize -- goes through four rather than the usual three rounds, and they've now announced the deuxième sélection -- the not-quite-so-longlist.
       Boualem Sansal's 2084 and Simon Liberati's controversial Eva have made the cut, as have the books by Alain Mabanckou and Mathias Enard.

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46. Writing in ... Nigeria

       In the Financial Times Tolu Ogunlesi writes about A new chapter in Nigeria's literature, describing a literary scene both vibrant and chaotic, where even success is problematic -- as well as relative ("publishers consider a book that shifts 5,000 copies to be a bestseller") -- as:

Commercial success for writers and publishers can be a curse -- attracting the attention of pirates, who are estimated to control 90 per cent of the book, music and film publishing industries in Nigeria.
       Check out also the list of 'Bright stars' at the end of the piece -- a relief not just to find the usual well-known names.

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47. No posthumous Wallanders (?)

       As I mentioned yesterday, Henning Mankell has passed away, and now AFP reports that his publisher insists there will no more Wallander books (written by others in Mankell's name, as the James Bond books now are, or the new 'Stieg Larsson', etc. etc.).
       "Nothing can be approved without my agreement" the publisher claims, but I suspect if the heirs really want to cash in -- and so often they do -- there won't be much that he can do about it. So I wouldn't be too sure that we've seen our last Wallander yet.

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48. Charles Williams: Oxford’s lost poetry professor

It was strikingly appropriate that Sir Geoffrey Hill should have focused his final lecture as Oxford Professor of Poetry on a quotation from Charles Williams. Not only was the lecture, in May 2015, delivered almost exactly seventy years after Williams’s death; but Williams himself had once hoped to become Professor of Poetry.

The post Charles Williams: Oxford’s lost poetry professor appeared first on OUPblog.

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49. INTERVIEW: Chip Zdarsky on Creating the New “Jughead,” Turning Down the Harvey, and Crafting the A-1 Burger

Calling all miscreants!  All slackers and gamers!  All those who would banish terrible cafeteria food to the secret tenth circle of hell (located in a specific unmentionable location on Satan’s person).  Archie’s Jughead is back with a new ongoing series written by none other than Sex Criminals’ Chip Zdarsky and illustrated by The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl‘s artist Erica Henderson. […]

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50. Don’t panic: it’s October

t the conclusion of the mid-September meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC), the Federal Reserve announced its decision to leave its target interest rate unchanged through the end of this month. Although some pundits had predicted that the Fed might use the occasion of August’s decline in the unemployment rate (to 5.1 percent from 5.3 percent in July), to begin its long-awaited monetary policy tightening, those forecasts left out one crucial fact.

The post Don’t panic: it’s October appeared first on OUPblog.

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