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Results 26 - 50 of 133,000
26. #STBAblogtour16 DAY THREE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2016




The Hired Girl by Laura Amy Schlitz
Sydney Taylor Book Award winner in the Teen Readers Category
At The Prosen People
Author interview

We're not sure what happened to the the interview on Shanghai Sukkah that was supposed to appear at Kristi's Book Nook today - we hope Kristi is okay and we'll bring you the interview ASAP. In the meantime, here is the Jewish Book Council's interview on The Hired Girl!

Be sure to check out yesterday's interviews on Adam and Thomas and Hereville, and get the rest of the blog tour schedule here.


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27. Aaron Sorkin to Adapt Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird For Broadway

To Kill a MockingbirdA theatrical production of To Kill a Mockingbird will open on Broadway. Scott Rudin, a famed producer, has acquired the stage adaptation rights.

According to PlaybillAaron Sorkin, an Oscar-winning screenwriter, has agreed to adapt Harper Lee’s beloved novel for the script. Bartlett Sher, a Tony Award-winning director, has signed on to take the helm of this show.

The Wall Street Journal reports that “the move marks a reversal for Lee, who after To Kill a Mockingbird was published told her agent she didn’t want there to be a Broadway adaptation of the novel, according to correspondence in the archives of her former agent at Columbia University.” Last year, Lee shocked fans with a To Kill a Mockingbird sequel entitled Go Set a Watchman. HarperCollins published that book in July 2015. (via The New York Times)

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28. Out-of-Print Diversity

There is a perception that we’re all very sophisticated and educated these days, as opposed to the past.  That older books for children have a tendency to be racist or contain outdated ideas.

Not so.

In my *does the math* thirteen years as a children’s librarian I’ve discovered that you can find some real gems if you just dig deeply enough into a library’s backlist.  And just because a title came out twenty or thirty years ago, that doesn’t mean it’s any less forward thinking than our books today (in some cases, more so).

The other day someone asked me a very specific question:  If you could bring back in print any diverse out-of-print children’s book titles, what would they be?

Now the crazy thing is that the first two books I thought of are actually still in-print, albeit in ebook form.  I’ll put them here anyway since they deserve a wider readership.  The first is the delightful Lavender Green Magic by Andre Norton.  Considering the fact that even today I can count the number of middle grade fantasy novels starring African-American characters on one hand, Norton’s book deserves to be better known.

LavenderGreen

The other novel is Sweet Whispers, Brother Rush by Virginia Hamilton.  A slightly more difficult sell as a YA (a genre that I believe dates more quickly than its younger counterparts) it’s still a compelling read.

SweetWhispers

Both of those are available through Open Road Media as ebooks, of course.  You know one book that isn’t?  A book that’s about a black, female, space explorer with art from the Dillons?  I’ve mentioned it once before but it bears repeating:

blastoff

An interior image:

Blastoff

Get more information on the book at Stephanie Whelan’s blog Waiting to Tesseract.

And just to make myself feel old, I’m including here a book that was in-print when I first reviewed it back in 2006 but has since fall out.  The delightful early chapter book Younguncle Comes to Town by Vandana Singh.

Younguncle_cover_1

I know that there are many other out-of-print diverse books out there.  Can you think of any favorites of your own?

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29. Kelly Clarkson Inks Picture Book Deal With HarperCollins

Kelly Clarkson has signed a deal with HarperCollins Children’s Books. The singer has become well-known as a three-time Grammy Award-winning recording artist and the winner of the 2002 season of American Idol.

According to The Seattle Times, Laura Hughes will serve as the illustrator on this project. The publication date for River Rose and the Magical Lullaby has been set for October 2016.

Clarkson posted a video about this picture book on her social media page; we’ve embedded her Twitter post above. TIME reports that “the story follows a little girl who’s too excited about the next day’s zoo visit to fall asleep, until her mom sings her a lullaby that gives her dreams about playing with hippos, penguins and other zoo creatures.”

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30. Jay Asher to Write a New Young Adult Novel

Jay Asher 200 (GalleyCat)Jay Asher has signed a deal with Penguin Young Readers. In the past, he has written two young adult novels: Thirteen Reasons Why and The Future of Us (a collaboration with Carolyn Mackler).

According to The Associated Press, Asher (pictured, via) has finished a contemporary romance novel entitled What Light. He drew inspiration to write this story “after reading about a family in Oregon with a Christmas tree lot.”

This young adult book will be Asher’s “first solo work of fiction in nearly a decade.” The publication date has been scheduled for Oct. 11. (via The New York Times)

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31. Locker Decoration Ideas

Rainbow PenEpic Locker Decoration Ideas

For those of you who have a locker at school, do you decorate it? With what? Share your ideas here! Target had a really cute locker disco ball. I was tempted to buy it. Then I remembered I don’t have a locker!

Read other kids’ ideas in the Crafts/DIY Message Board and then tell us how YOUR locker is decorated!

Moderator Katie, Crafts/DIY Message Board

Locker photo courtesy The Container Store

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32. Doug the Pug Inks Book Deal

51XRBqWk3HL._SX390_BO1,204,203,200_Internet sensation Doug the Pug has inked a book deal.

His owners Leslie Mosier and Rob Chianelli are working on a photo book called, Doug the Pug: The King of Pop Culture, for St. Martin’s Griffin. The title will feature shots of the popular Internet dog in his living room and out on the town with celebrities, among other things.

The book is slated for a November release, but is already attracting presales on Amazon. The title is already No. 1 in Dog Care books. The pug has more than 5 million social media followers across the various networks.

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33. #STBAblogtour16 DAY FOUR

A little catch-up today with the Shanghai Sukkah interviews, and two new Blog Tour stops: Everybody Says Shalom and Stones on a Grave.

Be sure to check out yesterday's interview on The Hired Girl, and get the rest of the blog tour schedule here.

Catching up from WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2016
 
Shanghai Sukkah by Heidi Smith Hyde, illustrated by Jing Jing Tsong
Sydney Taylor Honor Award winner in the Younger Readers Category
At Kristi's Book Nook
Author & Illustrator Interviews  


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2016
 
 
Everybody Says Shalom by Leslie Kimmelman, illustrated by Talitha Shipman
Sydney Taylor Honor Award winner in the Younger Readers Category
At Book Q&A's with Deborah Kalb
Author Interview

   
Stones on a Grave by Kathy Kacer
Sydney Taylor Honor Award winner in the Teen Readers Category
At Randomly Reading
Author Interview and Book review


 

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34. Scholastic to Publish a Book With the Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Script

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Art (GalleyCat)Arthur A. Levine Books, an imprint at Scholastic, will publish a hardcover book based on the special rehearsal edition script for Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Parts I & II. The release has been scheduled for 12:01 a.m. on July 31; fans will recognize that this significant date is both Harry Potter and J.K. Rowling’s birthday. Pottermore will publish the eBook edition.

Here’s more from the press release: “It was always difficult being Harry Potter and it isn’t much easier now that he is an overworked employee of the Ministry of Magic, a husband, and father of three school-age children. While Harry grapples with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs, his youngest son Albus must struggle with the weight of a family legacy he never wanted. As past and present fuse ominously, both father and son learn the uncomfortable truth: sometimes darkness comes from unexpected places.”

Jack ThorneJohn Tiffany, and Rowling worked on the story for this theatrical production together. Back in October 2015, Rowling announced on Pottermore that this project will serve as the eighth story of her beloved book series. The opening date for the West End show has been set for July 30, 2016.

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35. THE CROW'S TALE by Naomi Howarth

The Crow's Tale by Naomi Howarth came out last year (2015) from Frances Lincoln Children's Books. That's a publisher in London.

The complete title of Howarth's book is The Crow's Tale: A Lenni Lenape Native American Legend. 

In her "About the story" note, Howarth writes:

The Rainbow Crow -- a Pennsylvania Lenni Lenape Indian legend--is the perfect example of a story that was first told to explain the mysteries of the natural world. When I came across this beautiful tale, my imagination was immediately soaring with Rainbow Crow across wide winter skies and landscapes. The tale has been passed down through generations of Lenni Lenape Indians, mostly orally, and I have tried to remain true to the narrative, although I have visualized the Creator as the Sun, as I wanted to make the Sun a character in his own right.

On her website page for the book, I see this:
Inspired by a Lenape Native American myth, this beautiful debut picture book shows how courage and kindness are what really matter.

Yes, courage and kindness matter, but so do other things. Clearly Howarth felt that she was doing a good thing with this story.

I have several questions.

What is the source Howarth used for this story? She doesn't tell us, which means we can't tell if her source is legitimate, or, if it is amongst the too-many-made-up stories attributed to Native peoples. Without that information, teachers are in a bind. Can they use this book to teach students about Lenni Lenape people and culture?

Is Howarth's story a Lenni Lenape one if she changed a key part of it? She tells us that she visualized Creator as the sun. Could she (or anyone) do that--say--with the Christian God and still call that story a Christian one? Maybe, but I think most people would say that doing so would be tampering with a religion in ways that border on sacrilege. How do the Lenni Lenape people visualize Creator? Did she talk with them, to see if she could depict Creator as the sun?

By "them" I mean--did Howarth talk with someone who has the authority to work with her on this project? Increasingly, tribal nations are working to protect their stories by setting up protocol's researchers and writers should use if they're going to do anything related to their people, history, culture, etc.

As we might predict, Howarth's book is well-received in some places. This morning I read that this story is on the shortlist for a 2016 Waterstones Children's Book Prize. If you're in the UK, or if you know people in the UK who are on the committee, please ask them these questions. You could ask Howarth, if you know her, or her editor (I don't know who that is). Asking questions is what leads to change.

Published in 2015, The Crow's Tale by Naomi Howarth is not recommended.


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36. Behind-the-Scenes of the 11/22/63 Mini-Series

Hulu has unleashed a behind-the-scenes video for the 11/22/63 mini-series. In the video embedded above, Stephen King, the author behind the 11/22/63 novel, talks about the inspiration behind his alternative history story.

Members of the cast include James FrancoChris Cooper, Josh Duhamel, Lucy Fry, Sarah Gadon, and Cherry Jones. Franco’s character embarks on a time-traveling quest to prevent the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

Entertainment Weekly reports that the air date for the first of eight episodes has been scheduled for Feb. 15. Follow these links to watch the first teaser, the second teaser, and the full trailer. (via Slash Film)

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37. The Underwoods Face Off in the New House of Cards Trailer

Netflix has unveiled a new promotional piece for the forthcoming season of House of Cards. The video embedded above offers glimpses of the wicked Frank Underwood (played by Kevin Spacey) and his estranged wife Claire Underwood (played by Robin Wright).

Entertainment Weekly reports that “the upcoming season will feature the Underwoods pursuing separate paths to power, and the 60-second trailer offers a peak at the Machiavellian schemes, sexually charged rendezvous, and violent outbursts along the way. It also glimpses new cast members including Ellen Burstyn, Joel Kinnaman, and Neve Campbell.”

USA Today reports that the thirteen new episodes of season four will be posted online on March 4. Click on these links to watch the first teaser, the second teaser, and the third teaser. (via Gizmodo)

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38. A Talk With Pat Scales

Photo courtesy of Pat Scales

Photo courtesy of Pat Scales

Pat Scales is the 2016 recipient of the ALSC Distinguished Service Award, and we’re thrilled to have her share some memories of her years of working with children, families, librarians, and educators across the country. ALSC Intellectual Freedom Committee member Miriam Lang Budin chatted with Pat via email:

Miriam Lang Budin: First of all, congratulations on receiving the 2016 ALSC Distinguished Service Award! What a well-deserved recognition of your many years of dedicated school librarianship, professional leadership, and continuing guidance to those of us in the trenches.

Do you have any funny stories about your work as a champion of intellectual freedom?

Pat Scales: Yes.  I helped an elementary school in the late 1980s deal with a parent who complained about William Steig’s Sylvester and the Magic Pebble because “Sylvester has an out of body experience.”  She was, of course, referring to Sylvester turning into a rock.  I have used that book in teaching students about the freedom to read.  I told them about the complaint about the “pig policemen” in the 1970s, and then I told them about the later complaint.  They asked me to explain an out of body experience.  I had to say I didn’t know because I had never had one.

One of my favorite stories is the time I was teaching the First Amendment to eighth graders.  I told them that My Friend Flicka had been banned in Florida because of the word “bitch” in reference to a female dog.  I asked them to name other words that society has turned into slang.  A boy on the front row said, “pussy.”  The students didn’t hear him and asked me what he said.  I turned to the class and said, “John said pussy, and he’s absolutely right.”  I then recited ‘The Owl and the Pussy Cat.’ Not one student laughed. Later the teacher and I invited the principal to the class to hear the lecture.  He was amazed by the students, and said it was one of the best lessons he had ever observed.  I turned to him and told him that I was sorry he missed “pussy.”  He collapsed on the floor laughing.

MLB: Have you ever been afraid for your safety when working in the field?

PS: No, not ever.  There were two incidents that happened when I was at a residential high school for the arts, but they didn’t frighten me.

I served on a panel at ALA about privacy and the Patriot Act. What we didn’t know until later was that some very conservative organizations had planted people in the audience.  When I returned home I received some very threatening telephone calls at work. Someone even wrote to our governor complaining about my views.  I was called from the governor’s office just to inform me that the governor stood behind me.  Security guards escorted me to my car for about a week.  I never heard anything more after that week.

A woman appeared in the library one day around 5:00 and began pulling books, marking specific pages with strips of paper, and stacking them on tables.  Most were art books that had nude paintings.  There were a few graphic novels that she added to the stacks.  She quickly fled when I asked her if I could help her.  Then I spotted a magazine that had my name on the label.  She had circled my name and written “the problem.” I never knew who she was.

MLB: Can you tell us about a satisfying victory?

PS: I worked with a group of citizens in Fayetteville, Arkansas who were fighting a woman who was leading a campaign to get any books that dealt with “sex” out of the school libraries.  The group addressed the school board in a kind of town hall meeting, and won their battle.  It was wonderful to see a community group rise in support of books, the right to read, and the right to seek information.

I was also an expert witness to the Annie on My Mind censorship trial in Olathe, Kansas. High school students sued the superintendent of schools after he pulled the book from the library shelves.  Garden’s book had been in the library for ten years, and there had never been a question until a gay/lesbian group wanted to gift the book to the school library. That made the superintendent nervous, and he dismissed the selection policy and the materials review policy, and banned the book. The students were brilliant, and they won the case.

MLB: Have there been any crushing defeats?

PS: Yes.  The Miami-Dade Public Schools removed Vamos a Cuba because they didn’t think it accurately represented life in the Communist country.  They cited the cover of the book where a young boy is smiling.  “No child would smile under the Castro regime.” There were other complaints: “Only the rich would wear the festival dress.” “The boy pulling the oxen was too clean and neat and didn’t represent hard work.”  The Florida ACLU took the case to court, and they called me as an expert witness. We won the case in the federal district court, but the school district appealed.  The 11th Circuit Court of Appeals is very conservative, and they ruled that the school board had not violated anyone’s First Amendment rights.  The book was permanently removed.

MLB: Is there an ongoing battle that you feel is especially important?

PS: We still deal with issues related to “labeling” of content in books, and restricting students to books on their “reading level” in school and public libraries.  This is extremely troubling, because this restricts young readers’ access to books they want, or information they need.  There are documented cases where books have been removed from a library based solely on a Common Sense Media review.  This site uses emoticons to label controversial issues in books and media.  It’s all taken out of context, and the folks working for them aren’t professionals. There are other websites that label in much the same way.

There have been many censorship cases related to “reading levels.”  Parents and teachers want their really “good” readers to read books that have “high reading levels.”  Sometimes these books are too mature for the reader.  For example, a newspaper in Arizona interviewed me when The Perks of Being a Wallflower was banned in an elementary school in Apache Junction.  The school had purchased the book because Accelerated Reader put it on the fourth-grade reading level.  This case prompted the State Superintendent to send a letter of “warning” to all school libraries in the state.  The Perks of Being a Wallflower isn’t appropriate for fourth-grade, and shouldn’t have been purchased for the elementary school.

No librarian should ever allow any company to determine what they purchase for their library.  We have a number of professional review journals to guide us.

MLB: What can we do to help?

PS: Talk the Talk.  Walk the Walk.  DO NOT succumb to pressure from organizations from the “right” or the “left.”  Review your selection policies and make sure they include statements related to “controversial” materials and cultural and historical accuracy.  Then stick to your policies.

Encourage state library associations to sponsor programs; enroll in webinars about the issues; write blogs and articles for journals and newsletters; and, sponsor Banned Books Week activities for kids and adults to make them aware of the issues.

Pat’s regular column in School Library Journal, Scales on Censorship, is a valuable resource for reasoned, practical responses to intellectual freedom concerns. Questions can be sent to pscales@bellsouth.net.

Thank you, Pat!

The post A Talk With Pat Scales appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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39. Our Open Call #NY16SCBWI Conference Illustrator Journals!


For the last few conferences, we've been asking a handful of illustrators to share a page from their conference journals/sketchbooks of something that inspired them during the conference. (You can see some recent entries here.)

The idea is that it gives illustrators a spotlight, and shares a multi-faceted visual take on all the craft, inspiration, business, community and opportunity of an SCBWI conference!

This time around, we're changing it up, opening it up, to ANY and EVERY illustrator attending #NY16SCBWI who wants to take part.

Just add a link to your image that you've posted somewhere online here in comments. It's that easy!

Remember to SIGN your artwork
(including your website so you can be contacted if someone falls in love with your illustration.)

Ready? Set? Illustrate!


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40. Giveaway: Breaking Sky by Cori McCarthy (US & Canada Only)

Breaking Skyby Cori McCarthyPaperback Release Date: February 2, 2016Publisher: Sourcebooks Fire   Praise for Breaking Sky “Breaking Sky is an action-packed thrill ride that smashes through all kinds of barriers at a Mach 5 pace.” -- Carrie Jones, New York Times bestselling author of the Need series “Breaking Sky had me in its...

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41. Evangeline Parsons-Yazzie on Winning the American Indian Library Association's 2016 Youth Literature Honor Award for Young Adults

I'm pleased to share Evangeline Parsons-Yazzie's response to the news that Her Land, Her Love had been selected by the American Indian Library Association for one of its honors.

~~~~~

Evangeline said:

On Friday February 5th, when I was first told by my publisher, Eric Lockard of Salina Bookshelf, Inc., that my novel had been selected by the American Indian Library Association as an Honor Book in the Young Adult category, I held my breath and asked Eric to repeat the news to me.  I wanted to hear the news several more times but my memory has been doing that for me.  

A heart-felt appreciation and deep gratitude is what I feel toward the awards committee who selected my novel, Her Land, Her Love as an Honor Book. I am still in awe of the the beautiful blessing that the people on the committee have bestowed upon my novel.  

Her Land, Her Love is my first novel and one that I cherished through the years as I wrote and rewrote it.  I wrote it at a time when I was going through a divorce, obtaining my doctorate degree, raising four children under the ages of ten, and a first year of teaching at Northern Arizona University. At the time, I desperately needed strength so I turned toward the stories my maternal grandmother and my father had told me regarding the Navajo Long Walk which is a painful time in Navajo history. I began writing and gained strength from the stories of my elders.  So, not only has the committee blessed me, you have also blessed the Navajo elders with whom I consulted to obtain the truth about the Long Walk.  Since the story reflected a painful time in history, I decided to weave in a love story to lighten the topic and to hold the attention of my readers.  

I also praise and thank the Lord for the gift of writing that He instilled within me. It has been five days since I heard the news and I am still smiling!

Once again, I thank the American Indian Library Association's awards committee for the honor of their recognition for my work.  

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42. Spotlight on Breaking Sky by Cori McCarthy, Plus Giveaway

  Breaking Sky (Now in Paperback!) By Cori McCarthy   February 2, 2016; Tradepaper, ISBN 9781492621126   Book Info: Title: Breaking Sky Author: Cori McCarthy Paperback Release Date: February 2, 2016 Publisher: Sourcebooks Fire   Praise for Breaking Sky “Breaking Sky is an action-packed thrill ride that smashes through all kinds of barriers...

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43. MasterClass to Host the ‘Co-Author a Book With James Patterson’ Writing Competition

Patterson_square_cropsmallMasterClass, an internet educational platform, will host a contest for aspiring writers to collaborate with bestselling author James Patterson. This competition will only be open to students who enroll in Patterson’s MasterClass writing course.

Patterson gave this statement in the press release: “There are a lot of people who have the talent, but haven’t been shown the door to walk through. I’ve been surprised and impressed by the passion, devotion and talent of my students. They inspired me to want to help guide one of them through the publishing process. I’m looking forward to reading the submissions that are skillful, fast-paced and unpredictable.”

The submission deadline has been set for March 22 at 11:59 p.m. PST. Patterson will select the winning co-author on May 24. Contestants who are chosen as semifinalists and finalists will also receive a cash prize. Follow this link to learn more information and read up on all the rules.

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44. Author Guest Post--Katherine Fleet

  Five Secrets You Didn’t Know About Katherine Fleet   Hi, everyone! I’m Katherine Fleet, and I’m so excited to be here on YA Books Central. I’m the debut author of The Secret to Letting Go from Entangled Teen. It’s a YA contemporary set in a fictional town on the Gulf...

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45. DAY 11: RONALD SMITH

HoodooAuthorPic (1)

 

How can you not like a character named Hoodoo, who can’t cast a spell? Now that’s what I call creative!  Our spotlight is on an amazing writer, who has written a debut novel that awarded him the 2016 Coretta Scott King, John Steptoe Award for new Talent!  We not only applaud you, but The Brown Bookshelf is honored to spotlight , on this 11th Day of February,

Ronald Smith

 

Please tell us about “The Journey.”
I’ve wanted to be an author since I was a child. I grew up reading fantasy and sci-fi stories, and loved creating imaginary worlds. As an adult, I found my way into advertising, and became a writer of TV commercials. It was a lot of fun for a long time, and writing fiction fell by the wayside. “At least I’m getting paid for writing,” I often told myself.

Then one day, my younger brother, who was working at a Barnes & Noble at the time, turned me on to some great books for young readers: The His Dark Materials books by Philip Pullman, The Sabriel Trilogy by Garth Nix. Harry Potter, of course. That’s when I realized I wanted to write stories again. There was a period of a few years where I was writing very literary short stories, but seeing these great kid’s books inspired me to write what I loved to read as a kid: tales of adventure and other worlds.

Once I decided to focus on children’s lit, I found my voice. Several years later, I was signed by an agent and got a book deal

How about “The Back Story?”
I was fortunate in that I queried an agent who liked Hoodoo, but felt it needed some work. She told me what she thought wasn’t working, and asked if I’d be open to revise and resubmit. She didn’t have to do this, and most agents don’t. I agreed with her advice, and when I sent the manuscript back months later she signed me.

A few days after going on submission, I had offers from several publishers and the book went to auction, which, well, was pretty awesome, to say the least. I signed with Clarion, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

What does your Writing Process look like?
I write organically, without an outline or scene-by-scene plan. Only once I get a few chapters down, can I really see where the story is going. It takes shape as I write. It’s fun, because I am discovering it along the way, just as a reader would. I’ve tried writing programs like Scrivener but they just confuse me. I do outline a little, once I know where the story is going, but mostly it is all part of what John Gardner called “The Fictive Dream,” that place you go in your subconscious when you are really in the zone. It is a type of fugue-state.

I no longer work in advertising, and write every day in my favorite coffee shop. Some days I write at home, but I like having some background white noise, so the ambience in a coffee shop fuels the creative process. Plus…caffeine.

ron smith's book

The Buzz on “Hoodoo.”

2016 Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Author Award

A Junior Library Guild Selection

Cooperative Children’s Book Center’s 2015 Choices List

“The authenticity of Hoodoo’s voice and this distinctive mashup of genres make Smith one to watch. Seekers of the scary and “something different” need look no further.”
Kirkus

“The chilling supernatural Southern Gothic plot action is enhanced by atmospheric description of rural life in Depression-era Alabama…Readers will particularly enjoy Hoodoo’s authentic and engaging narrative voice.”
School Library Journal

“Hoodoo’s first-person narrative, which flows beautifully, has an appealing and natural cadence…Through his protagonist, Smith demonstrates an eye for detail and a knack for evocative imagery as well as for telling a riveting story with a dollop of southern gothic appeal.”
Booklist

“Filled with folk and religious symbols, this creepy Southern Gothic ghost story is steeped in time and place. Hoodoo’s earnest first-person narrative reveals a believable innocent who can ’cause deeds great and powerful.'”
Horn Book Magazine

“What a splendid novel. Reader, be prepared to have your foundations shaken: this is a world that is deeper, more wondrous, more spiritually charged than you may have ever imagined.”
Gary D. Schmidt, two-time Newbery Honor medalist and author of The Wednesday Wars

“Oh, wow! Hoodoo may just be the perfect book for a rainy day. Find a dog that will sit with you . . . and read on to your heart’s content. What a fun discovery!”
Nikki Giovanni, poet and award-winning author of Rosa

What are your thoughts on the State of the Industry

Shortly after Hoodoo was accepted by my publisher, the We Need Diverse Books movement took off. I think this is an exciting time to be writing children’s books, especially if you are writing about characters that fall outside the mainstream. I think publishers want these books, and are eager to find those that tell a great story. Has it come too late? Perhaps. But change takes time, and thanks to the voices of a few tireless advocates—booksellers, librarians, authors—diverse books are beginning to really be noticed. Every kid needs to see him or herself reflected in books. It’s simple. Seeing yourself, or someone who looks like you or talks like you or lives where you live, makes reading relatable to kids.

My website is http://www.strangeblackflowers.com
Twitter: @ronsmithbooks

Thank you, Ronald Smith, for your contributions to children’s literature!


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46. Parent Teacher Collection Re-Organization

Earlier this year, I took over the responsibility of the Parent Teacher Collection at my library. It was a natural fit since I had to keep bringing picture books to my boss and spending time together to figure out what collection a picture book like Todd Parr’s The Goodbye Book really belonged in.

I was also asked to re-organize the collection by de-Deweying and creating browseable subjects.

Instead of writing through every step, I made a quick infographic detailing my process:

[An infographic about developing a Parent Teacher Collection created by the author using Piktochart.]

[An infographic created by the author.]

Up-close photo of the spine labels of our Parent Teacher collection. [Photo courtesy of the author.]

Up-close photo of our spine labels. [Photo courtesy of the author.]


Collection Facts:

  • Collection has ten shelves; roughly 650 books.
  • Books are a mixture of adult books and children’s materials.
  • We decided on seven main subjects: Development, Health, Relationships, Safety, School, Special Needs, and Travel.
  • There are sub-subjects under every main subject except Travel.
  • While the collection is mostly comprised of books, it does have some DVDs and software.
  • At the bottom (in the red polka dot totes) are our Parenting Packs, which are kits geared towards parents/caregivers to use during milestone events.
  • Books show up in the catalog with the full call number: PARENTS DEVELOPMENT POTTY WILLEMS.

Our Parent Teacher Collection new materials shelf -- shows the range of what we're buying. [Photo courtesy of the author.]

Our New shelf — shows the range of what we’re buying. [Photo courtesy of the author.]

Purchasing:

  • Books are purchased by the Kids & Teens staff members from the children’s non-fiction budget line.
  • Generally, books that are used WITH children are shelved in the Parent Teacher Collection. Books about child psychology, parenting memoirs, and academic materials are shelved downstairs in the Adult Services collection.
  • I consult with the Adult Services librarian who selects for the 600s. We have determined that we are okay with purchasing doubles of materials.

Reception:

Up-close picture of a Parenting Pack from the Parent Teacher Collection. [Photo courtesy of the author.]

Up-close picture of a Parenting Pack. [Photo courtesy of the author.]

  • Every time I walk past the section, the shelves need to be straightened. This means that they’re being used!
  • I’m seeing 40% more of the collection moving based on recently returned books.
  • I see more browsers which is GREAT and the reason why we decided to de-Dewey the collection. Caregivers are often dealing with a difficult problem when they are looking in the Parent Teacher Collection. They might not be comfortable asking for help and may also want to get their information quickly. This project makes that possible.
  • A parent thanked me for integrating the picture books and parent books. It made finding the right resources a one-stop shop for her.
  • Another parent expressed gratitude that the subject she was looking for was all shelved together and easy to find.
  • Half of the Parenting Packs are currently checked out.

It’s only been a few months, but I think this is one of the best things I’ve done at the library. My co-workers are probably getting tired of hearing me squee every time I see the return cart packed with Parent Teacher Collection books. (I kid — they are all incredibly supportive!)

I’m still not 100% done and I never will be. I need to continually evaluate this collection and actively seek out new materials since they aren’t always readily available in traditional review journals. We’re also preparing a new marketing campaign to help show the organization of the shelves, as well as a brochure to help parents/caregivers navigate the section.

Do you have a Parent Teacher Collection? Any tips or tricks to share? Any questions for me? Let’s talk the comments!

– Katie Salo
Early Literacy Librarian
Indian Prairie Public Library
http://storytimekatie.com

The post Parent Teacher Collection Re-Organization appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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47. Leap Year Trivia Quiz

Leap Year TriviaFebruary 29, 2016 is Leap Day!

Poor February 29th. It’s the only day of the year that gets added and then dropped. Every 4 years, we celebrate it; the years in between, we don’t. 2016 is a leap year so this year, February has 29 days instead of 28 days. We get an extra day, but next year, it’s back to 28 days in February. Crazy!

Leap days are added to keep our calendar in alignment with the Earth’s revolution around the sun. It takes the Earth about 365.242199 days to circle the sun. Notice this is a little over 365. So if we didn’t add an extra day every 4 years, we’d lose some time. About 6 hours every year. After 100 years, our calendar would be off by 24 days!

Suspicious? You should be. Check out our Leap Year Trivia Quiz to investigate further.

  1. How many days long is a leap year?
  2. What year is the next leap year?
  3. If you were born on February 29, on which day would you celebrate your birthday during a non-leap year when February only has 28 days?
  4. If you were born in 2004, your actual age may be 12, but what is your leap year age?
  5. The chance of being born on a leap day (February 29) are:
    A. 1 out of 24
    B. 1 out of 99
    C. 1 out of 1,461
    D. 1 out of 1 million
  6. People born on leap days are called:
    A. Leapfrogs
    B. Weirdos
    C. Leaplings
    D. Leap-Lips
  7. Which famous ancient Roman ruler introduced the first leap day back in 45 BCE?

Click here for the answers! It makes me wonder – why don’t we have a July 32nd? Or another month that gets tampered with? Why February 29th?

— Ratha, STACKS Writer

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48. Most College Students Prefer Print to E-Books

Ninety-two percent of U.S. college students prefer print books to e-books, according to new research.

The numbers come from a four year study led by American University’s linguistics professor Naomi Baron who is also the authors of Words Onscreen: The Fate of Reading in a Digital World.

The research includes feedback from more than 420 university students from the U.S., Slovakia, Japan and Germany in 2010 and 2013. Tech Times has more:

The team also found that the main reason why students used e-books was because they were cheaper than the traditional paper book versions. It wasn’t always because it was easier to use or lighter to carry but some of the survey’s open answers included space saving reasons and convenience. When it comes to preference, paper trumps the screen.

(Via The Los Angeles Times).

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49. Red Light/Green Light Contest: Announcing the Top 50 Submissions!

Happy Thursday, everyone!

Below are the top 50 entries in our Red Light/Green Light contest, where writers are vying for the prize of a phone call with fabulous agent Patricia Nelson at Marsal Lyon Literary.


Be sure to check back next Thursday, when we'll post our agent judge's top 25 selected entries!

CONGRATS to all who made it in, and good luck going forward!

And now, presenting:

THE TOP 50 ENTRIES
Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Terry Bell
Young Adult Fantasy
1
Pa was taking too long to cut the boys’ throats.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Amber Duell
Young Adult Fantasy
2
War is beautiful chaos.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
D Lollis
Middle Grade Contemporary
3
"Mom, Brandon is smelling his dirty underwear—again," my older sister Bethany yelled as I crawled on the cold marble tile of the third floor laundry room.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
KD Proctor
New Adult Romance
4
If it’s possible for a tray of pastries to blackmail me, I think I might need to file a restraining order against The Steamy Bean’s cinnamon chip scones.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Kara Reynolds
Young Adult SciFi
5
The universe should have a rule that bad news can't arrive over breakfast, but it doesn't.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Mary Hallberg
Young Adult Paranormal
6
As Penny walked inside the funeral home doors, the cold air stung her skin.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Traci Kenworth
Young Adult Fantasy
7
Of all the things Karrie Hunter's mother missed about Earth, color remained the biggest.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Ellie Luken
Young Adult Fantasy
8
Only fools or the desperate wandered beyond the city walls by themselves.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Jennifer Schafer
Young Adult Contemporary
9
Dad says the empty spaces in our lives, like moments of silence in music, amplify or accentuate the importance of the people we hold closest.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Devyn B. Makin
Young Adult Magical Realism
10
Routine is what predators look for in their prey.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Laura McFadden
Young Adult Contemporary
11
I tug out two wipes and inhale the sharp bleach and lemon scent.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Sarah Vance-Tompkins
Young Adult Magical Realism
12
Not every fairy's tale begins with once upon a time.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Gabby Gilliam
Young Adult Other
13
My name is a bit of a joke, a cruel trick of nature to punish my parents.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
VV Sinnott
Young Adult Magical Realism
14
My parents were whispering in the living room, a sure sign they were talking about something they didn’t want me to hear.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Dill Werner
Young Adult SciFi
15
I was born to a woman who never loved me.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Michele Blood
Young Adult Contemporary
16
A bead of sweat nestled itself beneath the bandages pinching Alex's skin.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Anikó Rajci
Young Adult Fantasy
17
The thick string of dark red fury slips out of my fingertips in quick waves.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Olivia Hinebaugh
Young Adult Magical Realism
18
There wasn’t a funeral.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Angela Dahle
Middle Grade Fantasy
19
There aren't any unlucky numbers, only unlucky people.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Mare Hagarty
Young Adult Paranormal
20
The first time I saw her, she was a pink and black blur, all sharp edges and hollows.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Heather Lea
Young Adult Dystopian
21
Though humanity watches with apprehension and bated breath, I find myself drawn to this mysterious matter blanketing our world in gray.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Laurine Bruder
Young Adult Fantasy
22
Ivy Greenhill's mind ticked as the prison wagon trundled along the dirt road.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Gillian Libby
Young Adult Romance
23
I didn’t know it was possible to screw over your entire family after you’ve been dead for two hundred years, but it turns out you’re never too dead to ruin a legacy.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Dana Nuenighoff
Young Adult Fantasy
24
Purple mountains jutted into the sky before me as I choked back tears and instead a smile spread across my ocean-weathered face: the Pass.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Patricia Nesbitt
Middle Grade Historical
25
Last year, when I was nine, things were a good sight better.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Tiffany Dawn Munn
Young Adult Fantasy
26
Alorna Mirone studied her tiara, her nose crinkled in an expression of distaste.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Joan Albright
Young Adult Steampunk
27
Silas clung to his tiny chainskiff, arms wrapped around the rail while it rocked and pitched and finally settled against the chain that held it in the sky.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
PJN
Young Adult Fantasy
28
Four years ago no one knew my name.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Carol Baldwin
Young Adult Historical
29
Dead bodies don't bother me none.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Mae Parker
Young Adult Fantasy
30
Henbane Tower pierced the night like a dagger thrust into the heart of my kingdom.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Holly Pettit
Young Adult Historical
31
In the dark part of the city – the Soviet sector – a garden party was just breaking up.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Cindy Williams Schrauben
Young Adult Paranormal
32
It's a challenge to breath in a vacuum.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Cass Newbould
Young Adult Fantasy
33
Heat, intense but not unpleasant, hits my face as flames flicker along the wooden floor of my bedroom.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Lana Pattinson
Young Adult Historical
34
Ominous clouds hovered over the loch, and Rowan Sinclair was about to lose his chance at freedom.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
KPKnupp
Young Adult Suspense
35
For the first time since the accident, she felt comfortable in her own skin.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
TL Sumner
Young Adult Contemporary
36
I could do anything for fifteen seconds.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Gabi Snyder
Middle Grade Contemporary
37
After the funeral, I fall asleep and dream of snow.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Leslie Hauser
Young Adult Contemporary
38
They say music is the key to the soul or maybe it’s the heart.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Jennifer Pickrell
Young Adult Contemporary
39
I couldn’t stop staring at Chase Lewis.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Holly M. Campbell
Young Adult Paranormal
40
The man standing in the kitchen had not been dead long.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
ML VIllax
New Adult Fantasy
41
I hated Mother’s day, always had, always would.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Jodi Cardillo
Young Adult Contemporary
42
I hate it when bad music gets stuck in my head.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Marcy S. Hatch
Young Adult SciFi
43
I paddle out, breathing evenly in the early dawn, mist rising from the water.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Hess Oster
Middle Grade Other
44
Once there was a man who loved children.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Marva Dasef
Middle Grade Fantasy
45
A dark figure dropped silently from the window ledge to the alley below.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Cassidy Taylor
Young Adult Fantasy
46
Sounds of revelry drift up to Ruby's sitting room, but she wants no part of it.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Jenny
Middle Grade Fantasy
47
Deep in the forest, where the trees grew crooked and the wind whispered tales of woe, there was a tower, and in the tower there lived a girl.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Mary Bartek
Middle Grade Contemporary
48
Applause for the previous speaker was still dying down when the headmaster returned to the podium on the auditorium stage.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Lizz Huerta
Young Adult Fantasy
49
The stink of the Fire Warrior reached Indir before he spoke.

Author:
Genre:
Entry #:
Entry:
Amanda Perry
Young Adult Fantasy
50
The ship screams in protest as it skips over treacherous waves.

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50. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

Scholastic will publish the eighth Harry Potter book, HARRY POTTER AND THE CURSED CHILD, on Harry's birthday--July 31, 2016. Check out all the details here.   Join the rest of the YA book world as we hyperventilate and mark our July calendars with shiny stars and lightning bolts!    

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