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Viewing: Blog Posts from the Industry category, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 26 - 50 of 126,549
26. The role of the law, in the matter of Ashya King

Parents of a child diagnosed with a serious illness are immediately required to make decisions about their child’s medical treatment which, in order to save life, may cause pain, unpleasant side-effects and risk damaging their child’s future quality of life. The actions, last summer, of the parents of five year old Ashya King offer just one example of the lengths to which parents will go to secure the best possible treatment for their child [...]

The post The role of the law, in the matter of Ashya King appeared first on OUPblog.

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27. Herman Wouk Pens Book to Celebrate 100th Birthday

Pulitzer Prize-winning American author Herman Wouk is turning 100 next week. To celebrate, he is writing a book.

His book “Sailor and Fiddler: Reflections of a 100-Year-Old Author” will come out from Simon & Schuster this December. The memoir will cover Wouk’s years in the Navy during World War II, the inspiration for his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “The Caine Mutiny.” The new book is already available for presale on Amazon.

The Associated Press has more: “In a statement issued through Simon & Schuster, Wouk calls his new work a “light-hearted memoir” and thanks readers who have stayed with him “for the long pull.””

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28. Trailer Unveiled For Batkid Begins Documentary

A trailer has been unleashed for Batkid Begins: The Wish Heard Around the World. The video embedded above stars a five year old leukemia patient named Miles Scott who yearned to be Batman for one day.

The story chronicles how more than 25,000 people came together to make that wish come true. A limited theatrical release has been scheduled for June 26th. (via USA Today)

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29. We Need NEW SHOES, More Than We May Know

By Kirsten Cappy, Curious City

Yes, #WeNeedDiverseBooks and #BlackLivesMatter. These hashtags and sentiments are integrated into my many literacy projects and into our ongoing commentary on this troubled nation. Yet, the more I hashtag, the more I wonder if the book industry’s endearing and infuriatingly slow pace can create a place where black lives matter simply by producing more diverse books.

Authors and illustrators will do their groundbreaking and childhood-lifesaving work and the publishers will publish them. But, are the consumers, educators and libraries buying enough books?  Are they buying at a pace that will expose a child to enough books to show him or her that their lives matter—matter to all of us?

Into the middle of these thoughts, a picture book New Shoes by Susan Lynn Meyer and illustrated by Eric Velasquez (Holiday House) landed on my desk. In the book, young Ella Mae is forced to wait for a white girl who came in the shoe store after her and then denied the right to try on the saddle shoes she and her mother have come to buy. Jim Crow sends Ella Mae’s mother to her knees to trace her daughter’s feet on paper.

NEW SHOES_Page_1

The next day at school, Ella Mae has on her new shoes but “feels bad most of the day.”

“That’s happened to me too,” her friend Charlotte whispers when Ella Mae tells her about the store. What makes this story a marvel is that Ella Mae and Charlotte counter this Jim Crow discrimination with entrepreneurship.

Doing chores for neighbors, the girls ask to be paid in nickels and old shoes. After rounds and rounds of chores, they go into an old neighborhood barn. There they do not just play store, but create a store. With their nickels and their careful attention, they transform the old shoes into shelves of refurbished footwear.

When they post their “open” sign, the lines form and “anyone who walks in the door can try on all the shoes they want.”

NEW SHOES_Page_3

We all strive to have children try out all the books they want. I want young readers to experience the tenacity and creativity of Ella Mae and Charlotte! But how many will? How many families will buy this acclaimed picture book from a bookstore shelf? How many libraries will have the funds to buy it for kids to check out or for teachers to pull from the shelves for a lesson?

If books and stories change lives, if diverse books allow children of color to be seen and validated, then why is book purchasing not a major charitable action?

For example, if the message of empowerment through entrepreneurship speaks to you and you have the means, why are you not buying New Shoes by the caseload for schools, libraries, and after school programs? Books have meaning and mission, but the industry has always been designed for single purchase use.  The bulk sale is rare.  If #WeNeedDiverseBooks, can we not find an entrepreneurial solution like Ella Mae and Charlotte?

NEW SHOES Jacket

We certainly can match a person or organization’s mission – to instill a feeling or lesson in children’s minds – to a children’s book that imparts that mission.

Public funds for schools, libraries, and many non-profits serving children continue to diminish. These institutions would welcome donated materials.  For example, I recently posted an offer on the American Library Services for Children email listserv offering 500 individually-donated paperback chapter books by Polly Holyoke. That offer brought 1,000 grateful schools and libraries to our site in less than 48 hours.  They would say a resounding “yes” for books that reflect their community.

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The statement in New Shoes, “That’s happened to me,” is such a simple and searing statement of subtle and daily discrimination. Those subtle experiences of discrimination remain long after the end of Jim Crow.

Can we give kids of all races the tools to believe and act like #BlackLivesMatter by driving charitable donations of books? Is it as easy as setting up in the barn and painting a sign? It might be. Who wants to do the chores and gather the nickels with me?

NEW SHOES Text copyright © 2015 by Susan Lynn Meyer, Illustrations © 2015 by Eric Velasquez, Used by permission of Holiday House.

Kirsten Cappy of Curious City and Curious City DPW is an advocate for children’s literature and its creators and for schools and libraries. Through creative marketing projects, she seeks to create places where kids and books meet. She can be reached at kirsten@curiouscity.net or 207-420-1126.


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30. Cynsational News & Giveaways

By Cynthia Leitich Smith
for Cynsations

Check out the cover for Borrowed Time by Greg Leitich Smith (Clarion, Nov. 2015). From the promotional copy:

In this exhilarating time-travel adventure and sequel to Chronal Engine, Max Pierson-Takahashi and his friend Petra find themselves whisked back to the treacherous, dinosaur-packed Cretaceous Period.

Soon they discover they have more to worry about than dinosaurs when they encounter a girl from the 1920s with a revolver and one thing on her mind—to avenge the death of her father, Isambard Campbell, whom she believes was killed by Max.

Meanwhile, Max’s then-thirteen-year-old uncles, Nate and Brady, have inadvertently time-traveled from 1985 and have problems of their own as they face mosasaurs, tyrannosaurs, and other dangers. The two pairs must not only fight for survival, but join forces to find their way home to their respective decades. Mind-bending time twists and white-knuckle encounters with deadly creatures plus a realistic peek into the age of the dinosaurs make this a perfect choice for anyone looking for a survival story with nonstop action.

Congratulations to Greg, whose novel Little Green Men at the Mercury Inn (Roaring Brook, 2014) has been nominated for the Rhode Island Children's Book Award!

More News & Giveaways

Bombing Through It by Dave King from Writer Unboxed. Peek: "The actual process of getting the story down on paper has a unique intimacy and particularity. Stories are organic. You’ve got to let them grow as you write, even if you’ve already built a trellis."

The Symbiosis of Science & Poetry by Sylvia Vardell from Poetry for Children. Peek: "...people who feel uncomfortable with science often feel very comfortable with language arts, so a poem might be the perfect way to introduce a science topic."

How to Read with Rising Kinders and First Graders This Summer by Jill Eisenberg from Lee & Low. Peek: "...the ultimate goal here is to show our beginning and soon-to-be readers how reading can be a joyful, positive experience. This mindset will set them up for the best start to their school journey." See also Let the Summertime Reading Hoopla Begin by Frances Lee Hall from ReaderKidz.

Lee & Low Announces 16th Annual New Voices Award Contest from Lee & Low. Peek: "The Award will be given for a children’s picture book manuscript by a writer of color. The Award winner receives a cash prize of $1000 and our standard publication contract, including our basic advance and royalties for a first time author. An Honor Award winner will receive a cash prize of $500."

Depression Has No Straight Lines, Only Lies by Kelly Jensen from Disability in Kid Lit. Peek: "Depression feels like it needs a cause or a destination. The truth is, though, that depression is chemical; it’s a brain misfiring and miswiring in ways that don’t have an easy-to-point-to reason for happening."

Nancy Sondel's 13th Annual Pacific Coast Children's Writer Workshop & Retreat will take place Oct. 2 to Oct. 4 in Santa Cruz, California. Faculty: HarperCollins executive editor Kristen Pettit and agent Stephen Barr of Writers House.

Writing During Summer Travels by Kristi Holl from Writer's First Aid. Peek: "You may have activities planned (or planned for you) that don’t seem to show any gaps of free time. If so, look again."

Cynsational Giveaways


Don't miss the Kissing In America (by Margo Rabb (HarperCollins, 2015)) Audio Tour & Giveaway!

This Week at Cynsations


More Personally

What This Story Needs Is a Pig in a Wig (HarperCollins) with Emma J. Virjan & Greg Leitich Smith.
The lovely & brilliant author-illustrator!

Congratulations to Varsha Bajaj (Abby Spencer Goes to Bollywood (Albert Whitman, 2014)), SCBWI's Crystal Kite winner for the Texas/Oklahoma region! See the full list of winners.

Congratulations to Vicky Lorencen for signing with Erin Murphy of Erin Murphy Literary Agency, and congratulations to Erin for signing Vicky!

Personal Links

TX/OK Crystal Kite Winner!

Cynsational Events

Join Cynthia at 11 a.m. May 30 in conjunction with the YA Book Club at Cedar Park Public Library in Cedar Park, Texas.

Cynthia will serve as the master class faculty member from June 19 to June 21 at the VCFA Alumni Mini-Residency in Montpelier, Vermont.

Cynthia will speak from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. June 28 on an Association of Library Service to Children (ALSC) program--"We Need Diverse Books: How to Move from Talk to Action Panel"--at the 2015 Annual Conference of the American Library Association in San Francisco.
Learn more!
Cynthia will teach on the faculty of the MFA program in Writing for Children and Young Adults at Vermont College of Fine Arts from July 8 to July 19.

Join Cynthia from July 30 to Aug. 2 at GeekyCon in Orlando, Florida. See more information.

Cynthia Leitich Smith will lead a YA Writing Retreat for A Room of Her Own Foundation from Aug. 10 to Aug. 16 at Ghost Ranch in Abiquiu, New Mexico.

Cynthia will lead a breakout session on "Diversity in Children's and YA Literature" Aug. 22 at East Texas Book Fest at the Harvey Hall Convention Center in Tyler, Texas.

Cynthia will speak Sept. 19 at the Mansfield, Texas Book Festival.

Cynthia will speak Sept. 29 at Richardson Public Library in Richardson, Texas.

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31. Make-Believe Empire: A How-To Book

 

Back in the United States, writers could secretly imagine the same imminent fate for themselves: that when the revolution came in America, they would become its heroes—or even its leaders.

This grandiosity helps explain why apparently intelligent writers would sign on to a project so manifestly unintelligent as America’s invasion of Iraq, confident it would go exactly as planned. We find a clue in a children’s book published in 1982 by Paul Berman, The Nation’s onetime theater critic, who went on to a career as a self-described “liberal” booster of Dick Cheney’s adventure in Iraq, framing it as an existential struggle against Islamic fascism. It was called Make-Believe Empire: A How-To Book, and it is described by the Library of Congress as “A fantasy-craft book which tells how to construct a capital city and an imperial navy…. Provides instructions for writing laws, decrees, proclamations, treaties, and imperial odes.”

Left or right, it doesn’t much matter: it sure is a bracing feeling for the chair-bound intellectual to imagine himself the drivetrain in the engine of history. Or at the very least a prophet, standing on the correct side of history and looking down upon moral midgets who insist the world is more complicated than all that.

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32. Annual 2015: Outdoor Fun Between Conference Sessions

This is a guest post from Susy Moorhead, a member of the Local Arrangements Committee for the ALA Annual conference in San Francisco.

In a little over a month Annual will be upon us! The conference is always an amazing event and I am sure this year’s will be another one. Sometimes though you just need a break from the hubbub and somewhere outside is often a perfect fit. These are my suggestions of some places to go right around Moscone when you need to take a walk outdoors or get some fresh air.

The Moscone Center is comprised of 3 halls – North, South, and West. North & South are underground, so you’ll definitely want to head outside periodically.

The main entrances of Moscone are located between 3rd & 4th streets off of Howard Street.  If you have time between programs, for lunch, or even before or after your day at Moscone, here are some places close by to spend some time outside:

  • Yerba Buena Gardens is the closest large park and it is located just west of the main entrances to the North & South halls. It is between 3rd & 4th and Mission & Folsom. Here you can see the beautiful Martin Luther King Jr. memorial which is behind the waterfall. You will want to walk in the memorial from the north side. The waterfall lands in the largest fountain on the West Coast. If you pay close attention to the detail in the stone around the waterfall you will see our often present fog represented – you’ll probably be in the fog too. You can easily get lunch in the Metreon, which you will see to the south, and eat it on the grass.
  • Another park, a little farther from Moscone, where you can sit and eat lunch is South Park. Walk east and north four blocks to get there. It is between 2nd & 3rd street and Bryant & Brannan. This oval park was modeled after a London square in 1852. Initially it was only open to the residents immediately surrounding it. In the late 90s this was “ground zero” of the dot-com boom and after the bubble burst it quickly built up again as the site of web 2.0. It’s a beautiful spot away from the city. If you’ve read Confessions of Max Tivoli you might recognize this as a setting in the novel.
  • If you walk another two blocks east you will get to AT&T Park and there are lots of benches all along the water to sit and look at the Bay. Even though Otis Redding actually wrote "(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay" while in Sausalito, you may feel moved to sing it here as you gaze at the Bay Bridge and the Port of Oakland.  By the way, the Giants will be playing the Rockies during conference.
  • A pleasant longer walk is along the Embarcadero from AT&T Park to the Ferry Building. Either way it is a beautiful loop, a little over 3 miles, which you can do from Moscone.
    • You’ll get to walk under the Bay Bridge and marvel at how huge it really is.
    • Along the Embarcadero you’ll see Cupid’s Span, inspired by San Francisco’s reputation as the home of Eros, by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen. I always thought it was an ode to Tony Bennett’s signature song "I Left My Heart in San Francisco" and to me it can be both--and maybe you, too.
    • At various spots along the Embarcadero you’ll find white posts topped with yellow and black stripes that tell some of San Francisco’s waterfront history.
    • Be sure to go inside the Ferry Building. There are delicious and iconic food stands and restaurants from the Bay Area inside (just to name a few: The Slanted Door, Hog Island Oyster Company, and Cowgirl Creamery).

If you want to see more of San Francisco’s great outdoors there is going to be a bike ride around the City at 2pm on Friday. Here is a link to the Facebook invite – the ride is open to everyone. The ride will include the Mission Bay Branch Library, AT&T Park, the Embarcadero, Market Street, the Main Library, Valencia Street, Mission Branch Library, and the beautiful Mission Murals. There is a Bay Area BikeShare station close to Moscone at 3rd & Howard. It’s very easy to rent one for either 24 hours ($9) or 3 days ($22) – you just need a credit card. And if the entire ride isn’t for you, you can return your bike at other stations in the City (right now they are only downtown).

And last, if you want a drink to go with your fresh air there are a couple places close by to get one. Dirty Habit is 5 floors up from the street in the Hotel Palomar on 4th St. between Mission & Market.  They open at 5pm every day except Sunday. A beautiful place to go, especially after dark, for drinks and a meal is Claude Lane. It is located on the other side of Market St. parallel and west of Kearny St. (what 3rd St. becomes on the other side of Market). There are French and Spanish cafes and restaurants with beautiful patios and twinkly lights. You’ll think you’re in Europe! Really close by, but technically not outside, is the View Lounge on top of the Marriott Hotel on the corner of 4th & Mission St. Needless to say the view is amazing; check it out even if you don’t stay for a libation.

Have fun and don’t forget your layers! San Francisco can be really cold in the summer and you’ll hear this over and over again as a lot of visitors don’t initially believe it. You’ve been warned.

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33. As the Page Turns Features Review of Help Your Child to Thrive

Today is Day 10 of the 10-day virtual book tour for Help Your Child to Thrive, sponsored by the National Writing for Children Center.

Help Your Child to Thrive

Today, read a review of the book at As the Page Turns. Just click here:

Review – As the Page Turns

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34. The Irish referendum on same-sex marriage

Today, the people of Ireland will vote in a Referendum to decide whether to include the following new wording in their Constitution: 'Marriage may be contracted in accordance with law by two persons without distinction as to their sex.' This may happen despite the fact that Ireland has a Constitution grounded in Catholic values. Indeed, abortion in Ireland is still constitutionally prohibited. Homosexuality was only decriminalized in 1993, and the option to divorce has only been available since 1995.

The post The Irish referendum on same-sex marriage appeared first on OUPblog.

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35. Press Release Fun: The 2015 Anne Izard Storytellers’ Choice Awards

The Anne Izard Storytellers’ Choice Awards Committee is pleased to announce the recipients of the 12th biennial Awards.  The awards will be presented in a ceremony on Tuesday, June 16, 2015, at the White Plains (New York) Public Library. The program is open to the public.

The Anne Izard Storytellers’ Choice Award was established in 1990 by librarians, storytellers and educators in Westchester County, New York, to honor Anne Izard, an extraordinary librarian, storyteller, and Children’s Services Consultant in the Westchester County Library System. The Award seeks to bring the riches of storytelling to greater public awareness by highlighting and promoting distinguished books on storytelling published for children and adults. Folklore, fiction, biography and historical stories must be entirely successful without consideration of graphic elements. Books which enrich a storyteller’s understanding of story, folk traditions, aesthetics, and methods of storytelling are also eligible. Books considered for the Twelfth Award were original material, reprints, or new English translations published in the United States between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2014.

Recipients of the 12th Anne Izard Storytellers’ Choice Awards are:

Beyond the Briar Patch : Affrilachian Folktales, Food and Folklore by Lyn Ford [Parkhurst Brothers 2014]

The Boy Who Loved Math by Deborah Heiligman [Roaring Brook Press 2013]

Every Day a Holiday: A Storyteller’s Memoir by Elizabeth Ellis [Parkhurst Brothers 2014]

The Golden Age of Folk & Fairy Tales: From the Brothers Grimm to Andrew Lang by Jack Zipes [Hackett Publishing 2013]

The Grudge Keeper by Mara Rockliff  [Peachtree Publishers 2014]

The King of Little Things by Bil Lepp [Peachtree Publishers  2013]

Mysterious Traveler by Mal Peet and Elspeth Graham [Candlewick Press 2013]

Ol’ Clip Clop: A Ghost Story by Patricia C. McKissack [Holiday House 2013]

Once Upon a Time: A Short History of Fairy Tale by Marina Warner [Oxford University Press 2014]

Story by Story: Creating a Student Storytelling Troupe… by Karen Chace [Parkhurst Brothers 2014]

Teaching with Story by Margaret Read MacDonald, Jennifer MacDonald Whitman and Nathaniel Forest Whitman [August House 2014]

Whiskers, Tails & Wings: Animal Folktales from Mexico by Judy Goldman [Charlesbridge 2013]

You Never Heard of Willie Mays?! by Jonah Winter [Schwartz & Wade Books 2013]

For more information, please contact Tata Canuelas, Chair, at tcanuelas@whiteplainsny.gov,  or  Ellen Tannenbaum, Co-Chair, at storyteller29@gmail.com .

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36. Max & Shred Boys

MAX AND SHRED Meet JOHNNY GRAY and JAKE GOODMAN from Max & Shred!

Q: Which character are you more like in real life, either Max or Shred?
Johnny: Honestly, I do find myself a lot like my character, Max. He’s a very athletic person and I play a lot of sports. He’s a very charming person and I’ve been told that I’m very charming in interviews. He’s a really enthusiastic and upbeat person and I’m a really high-energy person as well, which really helps me playing the character. And he’s a really physical person. I use a lot of my physical presence when I’m speaking as well. I’m not like Max intelligence-wise. I do very well in school and I always strive for good grades. Max, he kind of struggles in that field of education but he’s a socially smart person, not really a book smart person. I use a lot of the same terminology as he does, like “bro” and “sick.”
Jake: I have a very good time playing Shred, but I think I’m actually like a mix of them. I have some Max and some Alvin traits. I guess probably slightly more Max maybe, but I’m very, very like both of them. I have lots of friends. I kind of like school, but not as much as Alvin and I don’t do science experiments at home. I think I’m a mix of the two.

Q: Why did Max give Alvin the nickname “Shred”?
Jake: In the pilot episode, Alvin is making fun of Max in his bedroom alone. He puts on a Max wig and his helmet and is all dressed in his snowboarding stuff and is just making fun of Max. And Max’s snowboarding agent comes into the house and sees Alvin. Since he’s all dressed up like Max, he thinks that Alvin is Max and he takes him snowboarding to a mountain and it’s in front of a bunch of people and it’s, you know, televised nationally. Alvin, who has never snowboarded before, has to go down this hill and do all these crazy tricks and do a 50-foot jump at the end, which is crazy. So Alvin ends up having to go because, you know, everyone’s watching him and he can’t just leave. Everyone thinks he’s Max. So he ends up going down the hill and his tricks are all wobbly and really bad and he just happens to land all of them. In the last scene when Alvin is in the hospital, Max comes to visit him, and they have their first moment really as friends and Max is like, “Wow, you shredded up that mountain so well. I’m going to call you Shred.” It’s a special thing between the two of them and only Max calls him that.

Q: How long have you been snowboarding?
Jake: 
I think this past winter was my third season. Johnny’s been snowboarding for way longer.
Johnny: I’ve been snowboarding for six years now. Hitting rails is really awesome. I might come up to a rail riding fakie and then I’ll hop up onto it and just board slide. That’s my starter move. It’s just easy for me and it’s a satisfying move, or maybe doing, like, a blunt slide on a rail.

What is your most embarrassing moment?
Johnny: I ripped my pants once in gym class. It was a grade 8 dance unit, and I forgot all my attire. So I’m up there in skinny jeans and we had to do this, like, wheelbarrow move, and, yeah, I completely ripped my pants and I was extremely embarrassed. It was really funny, but funny for everybody else.
Jake: 
First recess, first day, grade 2, got pantsed. I don’t even remember if I got pantsed or if they just fell down. But I mean that’s so embarrassing, right? First day, grade 2, I didn’t know many people. Yeah.

Q: How do you balance being a celebrity with a typical young boy life?
Jake: 
Honestly, just like every other kid, Monday to Friday when I’m not filming, I go to school. You know, I do all my school work. I do all that normal kid stuff. I’m very lucky, but I don’t feel like a celebrity. I do all that normal kid stuff honestly and then, you know, when I go to the Kids’ Choice Awards it’s so cool because it’s in L.A. But I don’t even feel like I have to make an effort to balance being on a show and being a 12-year-old boy.

What books would you recommend to a friend?
Johnny: The first book that probably made me want to read more is reading the Hunger Games series (for ages 12 and up). I love that series and I really got into them. I read them all within like a month and I usually don’t do that. And then it made me go read more. Like right after that I started reading Maze Runner (for ages 12 and up) and that was a really amazing book.
Jake: 
Classics like Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit I guess. They’d be the best ones. If you haven’t read the books, they’re very good. That’s what I would say because lots of people have seen the movies, but it’s an amazing story. That’s my all-time favorite book.

Do you have any pets?
Jake: 
I do. She’s sleeping next to me right now. Her name’s Daisy. She’s a dog. She’s called a Ganaraskan. It’s a mix between a poodle, a schnauzer, a Cocker Spaniel and a Bichon Frise. She’s very cute. Sometimes she’ll see her tail and just start running in circles. I know lots of dogs do it but honestly it’s so funny when she’s just basically like playing tag with her tail and no matter how fast she runs her tail’s going to be faster because it’s on her body. But that’s just funny when you’re just relaxing and all the sudden your dog is having a seizure chasing her tail.
Johnny: My favorite episode is the episode where I get a dog. I really love that episode because I’m a dog, animal fanatic. I actually have five dogs in my family, so I love dogs. We have a Boston Terrier. His name’s Maverick. I have a French Bulldog named Lola, I have a German Shorthaired Pointer named Violet, a Great Dane named Maggie, and a – who am I missing – oh, and a Schnoodle named Holly. They’re amazing. I love them. They’re all really friendly and they’re all pack dogs. But we live on a farm, right? So they can burn most energy when we go for really long walks. They can just rip around and then they come back in and they sleep.
Do you have a pet?

If you were going to star in a biopic about an athlete, what athlete would it be?
Johnny: I was thinking about a hockey player but at the same time, I think it would be really awesome to play some kind of football star, like some running back because when I played football I played running back. I love Marshawn Lynch. Seattle Seahawks are my favorite team, and he’s an absolute animal on the field. I just love his style.

Q: If you hadn’t chosen acting, what job do you think you would be working towards?
Jake: I don’t even know if I want to be an actor when I grow up. I’m open to lots of things. You know, I go through phases. Like, I’ll do a month of being really into something and then the next month I’ll be really into something else, and then eventually I’ll go back to that something that I was doing the first month. I just have lots of different interests that I pick up and drop. Something might come up and that might stick around. Right now I’m into learning different programming languages, which is fun. So, you know, there are lots of things and I honestly don’t know what I’ll do as a career.

What is one thing you think could help make the world a better place?
Jake: I’m a very environmentally friendly person. Our geography teacher at school always talks to us about that stuff. You know, I don’t use plastic water bottles. I have a reusable water bottle. I have a lunch box. I don’t have a plastic bag for a lunch bag. I don’t litter, obviously.
Johnny: Wow. I’ve never actually put any thought into something like that. But, I don’t know, like, some kind of technological advancement, like a different way we could filter energy instead of depleting our world’s resources. So, you know, cars can now run on . . . blahbity blah or like, “We’ve now figured out a way to create fresh water just by like putting these two kind of chemicals or elements together.” Something like that would be mass-changing for the world. It’s a great question. That’s the best question I think I’ve actually ever been asked.

Interview by Marie Morreale
Image courtesy Nickelodeon

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37. Jeff VanderMeer Inks Deal With Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Jeff VandeMeer (GalleyCat)Author Jeff VanderMeer has inked with Macmillan for a new novel.

Borne is slated to be released in 2016. Sean McDonald, an executive editor and vice president at Farrar, Straus and Giroux, negotiated the deal with Sally Harding, a literary agent at The Cooke Agency.

Here’s more from The Hollywood Reporter: “Borne is set in the future, where a woman named Rachel, scavenging for usable detritus, stumbles upon a creature she calls the Borne, whose origins and composition are mysterious. Is it an animal or plant? A deity, or a cruel experiment?” (Photo Credit: Kyle Cassidy)

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38. Review: Jandamarra by Mark Greenwood and Terry Denton

Jandamarra, written by Mark Greenwood, illustrated by Terry Denton (Allen & Unwin, 2013)

 

Jandamarra
written by Mark Greenwood, illustrated by Terry Denton
(Allen & Unwin, 2013)

 

Presented in a quasi-graphic-novel format, Jandamarra is a picture … Continue reading ...

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39. Mindy Kaling & BJ Novak May Collaborate On a Book

Mindy Kaling & BJ Novak (GalleyCat)Rumors have been buzzing that actors Mindy Kaling and B.J. Novak plan to collaborate on a new book together. According to Jezebel, they will earn $7.5 million for this project.

Kaling and Novak (pictured, via) both starred in the American version of The Office T.V. show, but off-camera these two have been involved with one another in a complicated romance. Their off-and-on relationship will be the focus of the project. Reportedly, this couple will make a formal announcement about the book during a panel at BookCon 2015.

Here’s more from the New York Daily News: “Kaling soon may have fodder for another book after this is all over. While the collaboration with Novak is to be published by a yet-to-be-named Random House imprint, her essay collection is being put out Sept. 29 by Crown Books — a direct competitor. There’s a rumor among publishing insiders that Random House could be using Kaling and Novak’s book to launch a new imprint that could appeal to authors with sensibilities and followings similar to those of the two ‘Office’ stars.” (via Vulture.com)

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40. Climate consciousness in daily legal practice

Thinking about climate change generates helplessness in us. Our persistent role creating this global catastrophe seems so inevitable as to be predetermined; our will to contain it, or even reach agreement to contain it, feeble.

The post Climate consciousness in daily legal practice appeared first on OUPblog.

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41. The Voice Coaches Compose Acrostic Poems

Have you ever composed an acrostic poem? The process involves taking the first letter of a word and spelling out new words to form a cohesive piece. The video embedded above showcases the four superstar coaches of The Voice dabbling in this art form.

Christina Aguilera and Adam Levine of Maroon 5 wrote pieces for the other. Blake Shelton and Pharrell Williams paired off to produce pieces about one another. What do you think?

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42. Parkinson’s disease: the flip side of the coin

The human brain might be perceived as an organ with two main strategic tasks: goal-directed motor behavior, and mental functioning in order to work out that goal. These two main functions have two prototypical diseases: Alzheimer disease, in case of mental function, and Parkinson’s disease, with motor function. Following its inception as an entity, Parkinson’s disease (PD) was long perceived to be a purely motor disorder with unimpaired mental functions.

The post Parkinson’s disease: the flip side of the coin appeared first on OUPblog.

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43. Noelle Stevenson, Tom Brokaw, & Dr. Seuss Debut on the Indie Bestseller List

Nimona Cover (GalleyCat)We’ve collected the books debuting on Indiebound’s Indie Bestseller List for the week ending May 17, 2015–a sneak peek at the books everybody will be talking about next month.

(Debuted at #8 in Young Adult) Nimona by Noelle Stevenson: “Nemeses! Dragons! Science! Symbolism! All these and more await in this brilliantly subversive, sharply irreverent epic from Noelle Stevenson. Featuring an exclusive epilogue not seen in the web comic, along with bonus conceptual sketches and revised pages throughout, this gorgeous full-color graphic novel is perfect for the legions of fans of the web comic and is sure to win Noelle many new ones.” (May 2015)

(Debuted at #12 in Hardcover Nonfiction) A Lucky Life Interrupted by Tom Brokaw: “Tom Brokaw has led a fortunate life, with a strong marriage and family, many friends, and a brilliant journalism career culminating in his twenty-two years as anchor of the NBC Nightly News and as bestselling author. But in the summer of 2013, when back pain led him to the doctors at the Mayo Clinic, his run of good luck was interrupted. He received shocking news: He had multiple myeloma, a treatable but incurable blood cancer.” (May 2015)

(Debuted at #14 in Children’s Illustrated) Seuss-Isms! by Dr. Seuss: “The one and only Dr. Seuss dispenses invaluable advice about life in this collection of his most memorable quotes. Featuring over sixty pages of cherished Seuss art and quotes from such classics as The Cat in the Hat, Horton Hatches the Egg, Green Eggs and Ham, How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, Oh, the Places You’ll Go!, and many more, this humorous and inspiring collection is, indeed, a perfect gift for those just starting out…or those who are already on their way!” (January 2015)

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44. Aspiring writers: Before worrying too much about networking/promo, FINISH WRITING YOUR BOOK.

0 Comments on Aspiring writers: Before worrying too much about networking/promo, FINISH WRITING YOUR BOOK. as of 5/22/2015 8:49:00 AM
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45. Zooming In on Inspiration

When I finish a big project, I usually have to take a few days to get my bearings. I look around, dazed, trying to figure out what to do next. Morning Pages help. Walking to the lake helps. Spring is inspiring!

My camera helps me focus—literally—when I need to slow down and pay attention. For me, that can be the key to opening up to new ideas.

I just turned in the fourth (and final) book in a nonfiction series for an educational publisher. It drained me more than I expected. So I’m filling the well. Here are some things I’m paying attention to.


Last fall, I buried 40 potted milkweed plants  (3 varieties) under dry leaves next to the house. When the weather warmed up, I put them in the sun next to the garage. So far, 18 of them have sprouted. Three more plants (and one more variety) have popped up in the flower bed, which is shadier. Now I'm watching for monarchs. (Are you? Check the migration map to see if they're in your neighborhood yet.)


A pair of white-breasted nuthatches were cleaning out a hole in a branch above the garage the other day. Will they build a nest there? I hope so. I love their weird calls (described by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology as "a loud, nasal yank") and the way they hop down tree trunks head first.


One of my favorite wildflowers, a shooting star, is blooming in the park. What an encouraging surprise! Maybe I can go back to work now.

Bobbi started this series of Teaching Authors posts about inspiration with a collection of wonderful quotes. Be sure to check it out if you need a dose of inspiration—and who doesn't?

Congratulations to Karen C, who won our giveaway of the YA novel in verse Dating Down by Stephanie Lyons. (Read all about it in Esther's interview.)

Baby Says "Moo!" is now a board book! Watch for a Teaching Authors Book Giveaway in June.

The Poetry Friday Roundup is at Radio, Rhythm & Rhyme. Enjoy!

JoAnn Early Macken

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46. 5&Dime Friday

Hello! I have lost time this week - I've been a day behind for the entire time, and I'm like, "It's Friday? Really?" This is the sad, sad result of going to meetings all week for various wonderful institutions - somehow this is the year of the... Read the rest of this post

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47. Harlequin & HarperCollins to Launch New Audio Imprint

Harlequin Logo (GalleyCat)Harlequin and HarperCollins Publishers will launch a new imprint called Harlequin Audio. The executives at this imprint will produce audio editions of books on the Harlequin list.

For the first year of operations, the team behind Harlequin Audio plans to release 200 titles. The inaugural roster of audiobooks will come out on June 30th.

Here’s more from the press release: “Harlequin Audio, in conjunction with HarperAudio, will work directly with digital audio distributors to provide full distribution to the retail and library markets. Furthermore, Harlequin Audio will distribute physical CD versions of all titles through relationships with Blackstone Audio and Midwest Tape.”

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48. This is London





The Royal Horticultural Society's annual flower show held at the Royal Hospital Chelsea is almost over for another year. We didn't go this time, but we enjoyed the coverage on TV. Yesterday one of the presenters remarked on the huge numbers of visitors despite the inclement weather.  I had to smile because earlier in the day I was leafing through "This is London" by M. Sasek and come across this picture; 










This is London

But don't worry, most of the time it looks like this; 


The Tower of London


St. Paul's Cathedral 

The Houses of Parliament

The book features many other famous buildings, but my favourite illustrations are of the people - like this one of The Guards.



or this group of school children



City Gents


A Chelsea Pensioner


I also like the glimpses of 'old London'

like this famous shop ~

and these Elizabethan houses in High Holborn

Covent Garden Market



The New York Times Book Review, October 18, 1959, perfectly sums up this quirky book.

There are not many words in Miroslav Sasek's This is London, but those few are most memorable...

The colour is magnificent and uninhibited, the draughtsmanship brilliant but unobtrusive (one gradually realizes that these bold, stylized drawings are minutely accurate as well as true in general impression). The humour is characteristic and pervasive but always subordinate. The jokes are all pointed. Miroslav Sasek has drawn the visitor's London from foggy arrival to rainy departure. His book is a series of impressions, unrelated, one would think, but they add up to a remarkably complete picture of the modern city. The words and pictures are closely integrated; each has it terse style and humour.







M. Sasek ~ Universe Publishing ~ Originally Published in 1959 ~ New Updated Version 2004 


find it HERE

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49. YALSAblog Tweets of the Week - May 22, 2015

A short list of tweets from the past week of interest to teens and the library staff that work with them.

Do you have a favorite Tweet from the past week? If so add it in the comments for this post. Or, if you read a Twitter post between May 21 and May 27 that you think is a must for the next Tweets of the Week send a direct or @ message to lbraun2000 on Twitter.

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50. Do America’s political parties matter in presidential elections?

April 2015 will go down in history as the month that the 2016 race for the White House began in earnest. Hillary Clinton’s online declaration of her presidential candidacy was the critical moment. With it America’s two major political parties have locked horns with each other. The Democrats intend to continue their control of the presidency for another four years; Republicans hope to finally make good on a conservative bumper sticker that began appearing on automobiles as early as the summer of 2009 and that read, “Had Enough Yet? Next Time Vote Republican.”

The post Do America’s political parties matter in presidential elections? appeared first on OUPblog.

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