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Results 1 - 25 of 134,702
1. This journal doesn’t care who you are (in a good way)

Hypertronic LiteraryHypertrophic Literary (AL) is open to submissions for upcoming issues. Looking for pieces that evoke a physical reaction, make readers feel something: joy, nausea, shock, desperation. Open to submissions of poetry, fiction, excerpts, and nonfiction. Hypertrophic accepts work in all genres and “[doesn’t] care who you are, if you’ve been published before, if it’s your first book or seventy-fourth.”

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2. And How Did You Spend Your Memorial Day Weekend?

BostonGlobeHornBookMe?  I spent it in Vermont. The rolling green hills.  The bears and red squirrels and little tiny insects that think your left nostril is a house and home.  The lovely company, particularly when you’re deciding the 2016 Boston Globe-Horn Book Award winners.

Yup.  Alongside fellow committee members Roxanne Feldman and Joanna Long (she of the magnificent Vermont home) we put our heads together and came up with some stellar winners.

What’s that you say?  You’d like to know who those winners might be?  Nothing doing, sweet stuff.  You’re going to have to watch the live feed this coming Thursday at 11 a.m. EST like the rest of the world.  I’ll give you one hint though: I like these books.  I mean I really, really like them.

Stay tuned, faithful readers.  The live feed video is here.

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3. Happy Memorial Day and Heat-Soaked Mondaze

I have nothing noteworthy for you today: not a thing. For one thing, it's a holiday. Gimme a break. Also, it is really HOT. Thirdly, I'm trapped in the mental quagmire that is novel revision, and it is a doozy. But I did want to pop my head up and... Read the rest of this post

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4. Featured Review: Return to the Isle of the Lost (Descendents #2) by Melissa de la Cruz

About this book: The sequel to the #1 New York Times best seller The Isle of the Lost Mal's an expert at intimidating her enemies, but she's broken the habit since leaving her villainous roots behind. So when she and her friends Evie, Carlos, and Jay all receive threatening messages demanding...

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5. ALSC Member of the Month – Alyssa Morgan

Each month, an ALSC member is profiled and we learn a little about their professional life and a bit about their not-so-serious side. Using just a few questions, we try to keep the profiles fun while highlighting the variety of members in our organization. So, without further ado, welcome to our ALSC profile, ten questions with ALSC member, Alyssa Morgan.

1. What do you do, and how long have you been doing it?

Courtesy photo from Alyssa Morgan

Courtesy photo from Alyssa Morgan

I’m the Children’s Librarian/Head of Youth Services at the Morgan County Public Library in Martinsville, IN.  I’ve been in this position almost 5 years, and actually began my career here as an intern.

And yes, the library and I do have the same name.

2. Why did you join ALSC? Do you belong to any other ALA divisions or roundtables?

I see ALSC as a way to keep in touch with other librarians across the nation.  Through ALSC, I’ve gained not only great programming ideas, useful management tips, and the knowledge that I’m not the only librarian who faces triumph and struggle on a daily basis.

3. If a movie was presented of your life, who would you want to play you?

Kate Winslet or Emma Thompson.  Even though I bear no resemblance whatsoever to either of them.

4. Do you have a favorite word?  What is it?

Serendipitous!

5. What forms of social media do you use regularly?

I’m a Facebook fiend!  I try to tweet (@LibraryLyssa) and blog (www.librarylyssa.com) on a regular basis but it usually falls on the back burner.

6. Do you have any cats or dogs or other pets?

One cat, Olivia.  When I was at the shelter looking for a cat, I was holding her in my lap and another cat hopped in my lap and hissed at her.  She very calmly turned around, smacked the snot out of the other cat, and went back to cleaning her paws.  I knew this was the cat for me!

7. What do you like to drink? Coffee, tea, juice, water, or something else?

COFFEE!  COFFEE!  COFFEE!

8. What’s the best book you’ve read recently?

The War That Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley.  The teen librarian and I recommend it to EVERYONE!

9. Do you normally celebrate holidays? What’s your favorite?

December 4 has become a holiday at my library because there are four of us who share that date as our birthday!  Cards and all sorts of sweet treats are brought in to help celebrate.

10. What would you be doing if you weren’t a librarian?

I honestly have no idea and hope I never have to find out!

*********************************************************************************

Thanks, Alyssa! What a fun continuation to our monthly profile feature!

Do you know someone who would be a good candidate for our ALSC Monthly Profile? Are YOU brave enough to answer our ten questions? Send your name and email address to alscblog@gmail.com; we’ll see what we can do.

 

The post ALSC Member of the Month – Alyssa Morgan appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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6. Author Of The Week: Chat with Lindsey Klingele (The Marked Girl), Plus Giveaway!

Welcome to our new weekly special feature post, Author Of The Week!! Each week we will be interviewing a different YA author and highlighting their upcoming release! We will also be hosting a giveaway of the book we are highlighting!!   Introducing Lindsey Klingele, YABC's Author of the Week!!  ...

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7. Have You Read The Go-Between? A Guest Post by Simon Harding.

There’s so little time and so many books that you’d be forgiven for not having read every great work of literature out there – but there’s one novel you absolutely must put on the old bucket list and that’s L P Hartley’s The Go-Between.

First published in 1953, the story starts with an elderly man, Leo Colston, fighting nostalgia while looking back through his old diary from 1900, when he was just the tender age of 13. The majority of the book focuses on the summer that Leo spent in Norfolk at Brandham Hall, home of school friend Marcus Maudsley.

As a poor boy suddenly thrust in with the wealthier upper classes, Leo feels as though he doesn't fit in, although he’s made most welcome by his hosts. However, the story takes a somewhat darker turn when Marian Maudsley makes use of Leo to ferry messages of a romantic nature to Ted Burgess – a tenant farmer a lot further down the socio-economic scale than Marian herself.

Of course, the pair can never marry, something that the young Leo fails to understand. However, he grows increasingly uncomfortable with his role as go-between and tries to put a stop to it, but is compelled to continue by Marian. The story comes to a tragic and shocking end – but you’ll have to read the book in order to find out how it reaches its conclusion!

The book has remained popular over the years and has been adapted numerous times for both stage and screen. In fact, you can actually book a Go-Between theatre break in London right now if you love the novel that much you can’t wait to see it acted out in front of you. Make sure you watch the 2015 film as well so you can really immerse yourself in the world L P Hartley created.
Simon.
~~~~~~~~~~~~

Thank you Simon, I have to admit I've not read it, although it's been on my must-read list for ages. I haven't seen the film or the stage production either - very remiss of me!

Have you read The Go-Between? Or perhaps you've seen the film or the stage production?

I received no financial compensation for sharing the above post and have no material connection to the brands or products mentioned.  
~~~~~~~~~~~~

I've been looking for an opportunity to share a couple of recent photographs with you. Our granddaughter Lilly was four last week so what better time than now…

Strike a pose Lilly – beautiful, thank you!

Lilly’s big sister started school this year; here she is at her first sports day. Well done Zoe it looks like you had a lot of fun!

With thanks to Karen & Steven for the photographs.

That’s all for now, I hope you are having a wonderful week.

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8. Coming Soon!

Summer Reading is imminent, librarians. We all have a ton on our plates and very little time to think about anything but programming, performers, reading logs, and summer fun.

Here are just a few books coming out in the next couple of months. Something to put on your radar when you get a minute, in between programs, when you’re trying to put together book orders.  Your kids will like these, and you will, too.

Source: Goodreads

Maria lives in the Bronx with her mom, who works two jobs to keep them afloat. Then her mom gets a job on a seaside estate on Martha’s Vineyard, and Maria’s life for the summer is radically different. Maria spends her summer juggling new friends, her Lebanese family, and an old map that she’s sure will lead to pirate treasure.

Source: Goodreads

Mafi’s long-awaited first middle grade novel has been called “rich and lush” by Kirkus. Alice lives in a land of magic and color, and she has neither. But she’s determined to find her beloved Father in magical Furthermore anyway. She has only one companion: someone she’s not sure she can trust. Can she use her wits to find her dad?

Source: Goodreads

The second in Gene Luen Yang’s graphic novel series about the mysteries and magic of coding, this one will basically fly off your shelves completely by itself. There’s something lurking in an underground classroom of Stately Academy: Hooper, Eni, and Josh are determined to find out what!

Source: Goodreads

Jenni Holm’s latest novel is about Beans, a kid growing up during the Great Depression on Key West. Beans knows that grown-ups lie to him. But he doesn’t really let it bother him. He’s got plans of his own. Beans is the cousin of the titular Turtle in Holm’s Newbery Honor-Winning Turtle in Paradise and returning to her beautiful novels is always worth it.

Good luck with summer reading! These books will be waiting for you on the other side.

*
Ally Watkins (@aswatki1) is a library consultant at the Mississippi Library Commission.

The post Coming Soon! appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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9. Scaffolding in Scene

There are two types of writers when it comes to scene, I’ve found. One type takes a minimal approach to the stuff around the dialogue. One uses dialogue tags, adverbs, and narrative to construct scaffolding. If you’ve ever worked with me no a manuscript, you know that I don’t take kindly to a lot of scaffolding. I feel that it distracts from the dialogue, which is the rightful star of scene. It’s usually totally unnecessary. When I see a lot of scaffolding, I often remind writers to trust themselves and their readers. Trust themselves to come across as intended, and trust their readers to pick up on what’s being conveyed.

The point is, if you can’t be clear using dialogue alone, you need to look twice at what’s within the quotation marks, not what’s around them. Take a look at the following examples. The first is dialogue with no scaffolding. I’ve only used dialogue tags twice, one for each character at the beginning:

“Hey,” Sara said.
“What’s up?” Zach asked.
“Oh, you know.”
“The usual?”
“The usual.”

I would say that there’s not enough here. We don’t know enough about the characters, what they’re feeling, or why they’re talking in the moment. So I would say that something needs to be added. But how much something? Let’s say that you want to really convey what’s going on with Zach and Sara. How might you achieve that? Well, let’s add some emotions, tags, fancy “said” synonyms, and choreography. The simple scene can easily become:

“Hey,” Sara snarled.
“What’s up?” Zach said, icily.
She waved her hand in the air, as if dismissing him. “Oh, you know.”
“The usual?” He made sure to roll his eyes.
Quite annoyed, she dropped her voice to a near-whisper. “The usual.”

Well, I would say it’s quite clear now how Zach and Sara are feeling. The dialogue is exactly the same, but now I’ve festooned the scene with all sorts of little extras that clearly tell the reader that Zach and Sara are having some kind of fight. Maybe they’re avoiding one another. Maybe Zach has come into Sara’s coffee shop and she has to serve him but she doesn’t want to.

There’s tension in the scene, I’ll admit. But maybe it’s also a bit of overkill? After all, after reading this, my head is almost ringing from being hit too many times. The writer here (me) is explaining the emotions way too much. “Snarled” conveys anger. Waving a hand in the air is a cliché gesture for dismissing. If that wasn’t enough, the dismissal is also explained (“as if dismissing him”). Eye rolls are another cliché gesture. Then the emotion of annoyance is named, and a tone of voice is introduced that further underscores the tension between the two. We usually only whisper things if we’re trying to be quiet or if we’ve tightened our throats in anger.

The second scene would have too much “scaffolding,” as I call it. Whereas the first scene has not enough. If Zach and Sara were really fighting with one another, there would be no way to tell without some help. You might think that I’m playing the scaffolding up to provide an example, and while that was my objective, I am not lying when I say that I’ve seen scaffolding that thick in manuscripts. And sometimes even thicker scaffolding.

Oftentimes, writers don’t trust themselves to be clear about what they’re saying. And they (subconsciously) don’t trust readers to “get it.” So they go overboard. You will know if you put up a lot of scaffolding because you’ll see that almost none of your dialogue exists “naked” on the page (without any tags or narration).

So what’s the solution? Pare way down. And let the dialogue itself do the emotional talking for you, instead of putting everything in the scaffolding. I’ve changed the dialogue itself to have more emotional energy. You can also use interiority to convey feelings, like I do with a peek into Zach’s head here. This would be my ideal third example, a sort of middle ground:

Sara looked up from the register. “Oh. Hey.”
“Oh.” Zach fumbled with his wallet. He should’ve known her schedule better. Maybe she swapped shifts? This was the last thing he needed. “Um, what’s up?”
“What’s up? What’s up. Really? You know.”
“The usual?”
“Yeah, let’s go with that. The usual.”

There’s a sense of tension here between Zach and Sara, but it’s not hammered home. There’s some breathing room for the reader to wonder what they might be thinking or going through, and it opens the door for more of an interaction than “I HATE YOU”/”WELL I HATE YOU MORE!!!” That’s sort of the tone of the middle example, and you can definitely find more nuance.

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10. Contest for dialogue-only short stories

Bartleby SnopesEntries are open for the Bartleby Snopes 8th annual Dialogue Only Contest. First prize: $300 minimum (higher if 50+ entries received). Compose a short story entirely of dialogue — no narration — that delivers a powerful and engaging story. Length: 2000 words max. Entry fee: $10 for unlimited entries. Deadline: September 15, 2016.

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11. Author Chat with Jacqueline West (Dreamers Often Lie), Plus Giveaway!

Today on the YABC blog we are happy to sit down with author Jaqueline West and talk with her about her about her new novel Dreamers Often Lie, which released April 5th, 2016!    YABC: What surprised you most while writing your latest book? I wrote this book between deadlines for my middle grade series,...

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12. Seeking speculative writing about social justice issues, the marginalized

The SpectatorialThe University of Toronto’s speculative fiction journal, The Spectatorial, is currently looking for fiction, poetry, articles, essays, graphic fiction, novel excerpts, book/movie reviews, etc. Particularly interested in topics that touch upon other cultures and marginalized groups, whether it’s discussing literature no one has heard of from another country, or addressing social justice issue in a speculative work. Articles 500-1200 words, or pitched proposals for topics of interest. Deadline: ongoing.

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13. Spotlight on The Ministry of Ghosts by Alex Shearer, Plus Giveaway!

Today we're spotlighting Alex Shearer's novel, The Ministry of Ghosts! Read on for more about Alex, his novel, an excerpt, plus a giveaway!   Meet Alex Shearer! Alex Shearer was born in Wick, in the far north of Scotland. His father was a blacksmith and his mother was a secretary. He enjoyed...

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14. Top Ten Tuesday: Beach Reads Week

Welcome to Young Adult Book Central's Top Ten Tuesday post! Each Tuesday we will be hosting a different theme or topic involving all things bookish!!! The Top Ten Tuesday post was originally created at The Broke and The Bookish so visit there site for all the fun details about this awesome meme!!   This week's...

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15. Certain Songs #551: Guided by Voices – “Tractor Rape Chain”

GBV - Bee Thousand Album: Bee Thousand
Year: 1994

It starts out with just an acoustic guitar being ramdomly strummed in the corner of a room, as if Robert Pollard hasn’t quite worked out the song that the rest of the band — who are filing into the room and grabbing their instruments — are going to play next.

Suddenly, he finds a riff, and “Tractor Rape Chain” explodes into full-blown technicolor glory, guitars perfectly interlocked, drums right on the spot, and everything right with the world. Maybe this is low-fi, but it sure isn’t a song that was accidentally recorded.

This time, when the guitars pop-in-and-out of the mix, it’s for emphasis, not because there was a problem with the recording.

Meanwhile, Robert Pollard alternates verses about a relationship coming apart with a chorus about the furrows a tractor makes in a rapeseed field, sung at the very top of his range.

Parallel lines on a slow decline
Tractor rape chain
Better yet, let’s all get wet
On the tractor rape chain
Speed up, slow down, go all around in the end

I don’t know if that’s supposed to be some kind of metaphor, or if those were just some words that fit the melody that came to his head. Probably the latter.

All I know is that I loved guitar sound on the verses and the stop and build to the chorus. And I really loved the long, arcing melody line of that chorus, how it soared at the beginning, but somehow got almost sad by the time it was over.

And when he got hung up on “Speed up, slow down, go all around in the end”, so did I. That would be the part that I would sing over and over in my head after any time I listened to Bee Thousand.

“Tractor Rape Chain”

“Tractor Rape Chain” performed live in 2014

Every Certain Song Ever
A filterable, searchable & sortable database with links to every “Certain Song” post I’ve ever written.

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Certain Songs Spotify playlist
(It’s recommended that you listen to this on Spotify as their embed only has 200 songs.)

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The post Certain Songs #551: Guided by Voices – “Tractor Rape Chain” appeared first on Booksquare.

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16. Wanted: Work by writers who ‘like to watch the world burn’

SlashnBurn is “an anti-art arts journal seeking to publish and bring attention to work outside the conveyor belt work coming out of most workshop-based MFA programs.” Currently accepting submissions in fiction, flash fiction, comics, creative nonfiction, memoir, poetry, reviews, and blended-genre. No hard genre work. High-concept is fine, but grounded in real human conflict and action. Deadline: Rolling.

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17. Searching for Community

Preparing for my first ALSC guest blog post, I entered the search term “community” on the main page of the ALSC blog.  I wanted to make sure that I was not bringing up something already that had already been discussed.  As librarians, we pride ourselves on our detailed, often photographic memories, and enjoy setting the record straight. It’s in our DNA.

I searched for the word community because after 21 years as a children’s librarian, everything has boiled down to community for me.   I remember some great story times, fun summer reading programs, the excitement of Harry Potter, and selecting materials for a new library branch that was being built. I’ve worked with and for some innovative librarians and in some beautiful buildings.

I’ve decided that community matters the most to me.  The changes in publishing have been quite interesting. Technology and its accompanying acronyms have been overwhelming, but still exhilarating.

The daily interactions with my community-with the children, the parents and other customers I are what make this profession so important to me. Here’s why:  Many librarians are introverts.  Often, we go to library school because we love information, books and systems, and we may just love them more than people.

I spent perhaps the first 15 years of being a children’s librarian figuring out what it meant to be a librarian in my community.  I knew that I liked working with children. And then it hit me:  I realized that my presence in the community meant children and parents would see someone different than themselves, and that others would see someone that did resemble themselves.  In both cases I began to see that library programs, and more specifically story time, brought together people that might not ordinarily spend time with each other outside of the library.

I’m African American, and although I think of myself first as a person, I’m aware that my customers might see me first as a person of color. In fact, for the small children that I see weekly, I might be one of the first persons of color that they see regularly.

Yes, it is extremely important that children see themselves in books. I am thrilled that the topic of diversity in books is being widely discussed and that there is an increase in the number of titles that show what the true makeup of our communities is.

I’d like to add to the discussion by saying this:  When you step into a place and see someone that looks like you, it normalizes your experience. Our world is no longer monochromatic, and the places where we gather information or gather with others must not be either. It is good to remember the power of the relationships in our communities and the power of the desire that parents have to do good things for their kids.

Libraries have always been good at creating programs to bring our communities in. After all, story time is a program. What I believe is that a program is just the icing on the cake. The cake is the foundation of what we, the librarians create by welcoming our customers, all of our customers. We welcome our customers by becoming a part of the fabric of our communities and making our presence known, and our presence must be that which represents the world we live in.

********************************************************************

Photo courtesy of guest blogger

Photo courtesy of guest blogger

Our guest blogger is Ericka Chilcoat. Ericka is a Librarian at the Merced County Library and gets her best ideas about Children’s Services when she is eating Thai food.

Please note that as a guest post, the views expressed here do not represent the official position of ALA or ALSC.

If you’d like to write a guest post for the ALSC Blog, please contact Mary Voors, ALSC Blog manager, at alscblog@gmail.com.

The post Searching for Community appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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18. Summer Social Goals

Peep says Hi.Summer Social Goals

Happy summer, everyone! As far as I am concerned, the best thing about summer is all the free, unlimited READING TIME! After a long school year of assignments and homework, it is finally time to read whatever you want for as long as you want, but sometimes summer can feel a bit . . . unsocial since you don’t see always your friends every day. How can you celebrate the joys of unlimited reading time and still be social? Join the Message Boards in June for your summer social goals!

Here are a few challenges to get you started meeting new online friends, chatting, and supporting your fellow readers! Choose one or choose them all and go get social!

Tell us your June social goals in the Comments. Then sign in to the Message Boards and start being social!

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19. Submit a #alaac17 Program Proposal

Submit a Program Proposal for the 2017 ALA Annual Conference

ALSC is now accepting proposals for innovative programs for the 2017 ALA Annual Conference. Be part of this exciting professional development opportunity by submitting your program today!

To submit a program proposal for the 2017 Annual Conference, please visit the ALSC website. for the submission form and instructions. The 2017 ALA Annual Conference is scheduled for June 22-27, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. All proposals must be submitted by Thursday, June 2, 2016.

Submit a proposal

Need help getting started? In January, the Program Coordinating Committee put out a call for ideas and asked for your feedback. We offered thirteen topic areas and asked members to rank their favorites. Here are all thirteen topic areas we suggested ranked in order of ALSC members’ choices:

  1. Diversity in children’s lit
  2. Partnerships and outreach
  3. Age specific programming
  4. STEM/STEAM
  5. Summer learning
  6. Difficult conversations
  7. Media mentorship
  8. Recent immigrant communities
  9. Collection development
  10. Diversity in the profession
  11. Advocacy
  12. Gender diversity
  13. Networking

Need more inspiration? Below you’ll find additional ideas suggested by ALSC members in response to the survey. These are not ranked and appear in the order in which they were received. Additional Program Ideas:

  • Continuing Education after the MLIS
  • Working with difficult coworkers/directors/city agencies– best practices, stress relief, etc.
  • Programming for Children with Special Needs
  • Localized networking- how to bring back info from ALA, etc, and share with people who can’t afford time/money for conference
  • Poetry, poetry programs, apps, National Poetry Month
  • Social services: ie. Food programs at the library to serve hungry families, homelessness, libraries as a safe environment etc
  • Child development and how it relates to library services, the mechanics of reading ( to help with readers advisory for emerging readers)
  • The impact on tech on families
  • Recent youth space upgrades/renovations. Slide shows etc
  • Early Literacy/Babies Need Words
  • Preschool Programming outside of storytime
  • Becoming a youth services manager
  • Statistics, budgeting
  • I would love to see a diversity track that covers diversity in the profession, networking with others that are from a more diverse culture, diversity in children’s lit, gender diversity, also how to encourage diversity in publishing and other areas related to libraries.
  • Creating a culture of reading in our community
  • Time/workload management; librarian lifehacks
  • Leadership and management chops
  • Homeschooling
  • Serving low-income kids and families
  • Parent involvement
  • Advancing early literacy best practices based on research- screens and reality

Please note that participants attending ALSC programs are seeking valuable educational experiences; the Program Coordinating Committee will not select a program session that suggests commercial sales or self-promotion. Presentations should provide a valuable learning experience and avoid being too limited in scope.

Please contact the chair of the ALSC Program Coordinating Committee, Amy Martin with questions.

Submit a proposal

Image courtesy of ALSC.

The post Submit a #alaac17 Program Proposal appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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20. It's Live!! Cover Reveal: Exo by Fonda Lee + Giveaway (US/Canada)

Hi, YABCers! Today we're super excited to celebrate the new cover reveal for EXO by Fonda Lee, releasing January 31, 2017 from Scholastic. Before we get to the cover, here's a note from Fonda: Welcome to the cover reveal for EXO, my upcoming science fiction action novel. I’m excited to be...

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21. Contest for full-length poetry collections

Rescue PressRescue Press invites entries for the Black Box Poetry Prize, a contest for full-length collections of poetry. Open to poets at any stage in their writing careers. Judge: Douglas Kearney. No reading fee; however donations are appreciated and go toward publishing the winning manuscript(s). Authors who donate $15 or more receive a Rescue Press book of their choice. Deadline: June 30, 2016.
Twitter: @rescuepress.co

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22. The Safest Lie


Reviewing too many Holocaust books has brought on "Holocaust fatigue" for me, so I don't cover them very often on The Book of Life. However, The Safest Lie intrigued me with its back story of author Angela Cerrito's meeting with Irena Sendler. Angela lives in Germany, but I Skyped with her while she was visiting the United States. The Safest Lie was named a 2016 Notable Book by the Association of Jewish Libraries' Sydney Taylor Book Award committee.


AUDIO:


Or click Mp3 File (28:13)


CREDITS:

Produced by: Feldman Children's Library at Congregation B'nai Israel 
Supported in part by: Association of Jewish Libraries  
Theme music: The Freilachmakers Klezmer String Band  
Facebook: facebook.com/bookoflifepodcast  
Twitter: @bookoflifepod 
 
Support The Book of Life by becoming a patron at Patreon.com/bookoflife!
 
Your feedback is appreciated! Please write to bookoflifepodcast@gmail.com or leave a voicemail at 561-206-2473


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23. If Your User Name Came to Life

Rainbow PenIf Your User Name Came to Life . . .

Today’s blog post comes from PurpleFairy1862 who asks, “What happened when your user name came alive?”

Here is her answer: 1,862 purple fairies are trying to kill me by using a magical spell while I am in a trap.

What would happen if YOUR user name came to life? Go to the STACK Back Message Board and leave your answer for your own user name. If you don’t have a user name, it’s easy to get one — and free! Sign up now.

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24. What's New In YA ~ May 31, 2016

Are you wondering what's new in YA today? Check out these wonderful new releases!   BEWARE THAT GIRL by Teresa Toten For fans of We Were Liars, The Girl on the Train, and Gone Girl, this powerful psychological thriller with multiple mysteries is set against the backdrop of the megawealthy elite of New York...

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25. Featured Review: Wandering Wild by Jessica Taylor

About The Book: Raised by Wanderers, sixteen-year-old Tal travels the roads of the southern wild in her Chevy by day and camps in her tent trailer at night. Hustling, conning, and grifting her way into just enough cash to save her fifteen-year-old brother, Wen, from bare-knuckle fighting was once enough to...

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