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2576. Tom Hovey

tumblr_nutk12HsCY1qh8ig9o1_1280 Granola tumblr_nu5f6wPWph1qh8ig9o1_500 tumblr_ntdli04BX51qh8ig9o1_500 Big-Burger 

Tom Hovey is a welsh illustrator who is currently based in Bristol. He is most known for his food illustrations featured on The Great British Bake off. His illustrations have appeared in such things as editorials, animation and apparel design. With clients such as The BCC, Red Bull and RSA to name a few.

See more from Toms portfolio at his website and blog

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2577. WIP Wednesday

Have had such a busy busy summer/fall - I've been lax in posting. However, I just finished all I'm apparently going to do on the piece I started at IMC this past June:


Summer Solstice. Mixed media on paper.

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2578. WALL ART - laure girardin : ikea

I was really pleased to see Ikea were again working with artist and designer Laure Girardin. After her successful multicoloured tree design comes a set of three food prints, plus a new alphabet design. You can find the posters in your local Ikea now and online.

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2579. Iran’s Hoorakhsh Studio Creates “Pegasus” for King Raam

One of Iran's leading animation studios, Hoorakhsh has created a new music video for King Raam.

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2580. TEXTILES - round-up

When I get the time I love having a little bit of fun on google japan looking for fabrics, mainly of the Scandinavian variety. The first label I came across this time though hale from Estonia and they are Kuks & Kuttner. My next discovery was Studio Hilla who are based in Finland and feature six independent designers who all have different experiences and design

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2581. Noodle puts STAR STUFF: Carl Sagan and the Mysteries of the Cosmos into and Infographic!




The folks at Noodle.com, who specialize in all things educational put STAR STUFF: Carl Sagan and the Mysteries of the Cosmos into an infographic! How cool is that? What an honor to be in the company of those books.  




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2582. Madonna Davidoff at CBIG illustration Directory

As a member & former officer of CBIG (Childrens Book Illustrators Group) based in New York City, I am included in the CBIG Illustration directory.

 Here is my Black and white Promo page: 






It can also  be viewed at the CBIG ( Childrens Book Illustrator Group ) website below:




(Madonna Davidoff on page 29)

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2583. Back in the MU heading back to CA for an Important Gig

I have been back in Mauritius for over a month now and am settled in again. Summer is coming on this side of the planet. It's getting warmer, there is more birdsong and I am awoken by sunlight coming in the window because the angle is now just right. 

I haven't written for awhile- I haven't really felt like it until now. Not sure really why. Maybe because I have so much writing to do for books and spend so much time in my studio at the computer...anyhow, today I feel like it. So, "hello".

This morning I saw a needle fish darting across the surface of the water. Such and odd looking creature. close to the shore, brown jelly fish sat and tried to push themselves back into the Indian Ocean. A man picked one up- I gasped, wouldn't he be stung?? Not that kind of jelly fish. These had ridden the north winds onto to shore and they were harmless. They are moon jellyfish. 

It's just 10 days to go and I am off to the U.S. again- this time to speak at the 35th Anniversary of the Planetary Society- of which Carl Sagan was a founding member. I couldn't pass that up, could I? (No.) It will be the first book event that I attend for STAR STUFF: Carl Sagan and the Mysteries of the Cosmos. I was here when the book came out and then for most of the year. 

It's going to be a whirlwind trip. I arrive home in California on the 13th, speak and sign books in Pasadena on the 24th and fly out South Africa for 10 days on the 25th, then back to Mauritius. 

I'm glad I'm doing all of this traveling now while I can. It is exhausting and I can see losing my appetite for going to far flung places in a few years. Then I think I will content myself with my garden, my work and family.

In the meantime, here are some photos of Mauritius.



A village weaver. 


More bananas than we know what to do with from a tree in the backyard. The bummer is that they go ripe almost all at once!




Double rainbows!









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2584. Haejin Park

3b2277_3a8979bbe2104b8cad1cb2dabcb7d615.jpg_srb_p_600_326_75_22_0.50_1.20_0Haejin Park is a Brooklyn-based illustrator, freshly graduated from RISD. Her illustrations are packed with intriguing and fun details and abundant color palettes. Each piece in her portfolio contains happy surprises, such as characters swimming in donuts, or beautifully detailed insects. 

3b2277_0b2a3eebba914c4794d170b5a8107c64.jpg_srb_p_600_540_75_22_0.50_1.20_0

Pizze Beach is a great example of her talent for imagining unusual narratives, with pizza toppings sunning themselves on a cheesy surface. 

3b2277_ac90f3fe96104d8586b721a239f85aa0.jpg_srb_p_600_599_75_22_0.50_1.20_0 3b2277_5134a74de9774102975adb7c776d429d.jpg_srb_p_600_615_75_22_0.50_1.20_0 3b2277_4882b8ed8f6040d1b083b99f868f1436.jpg_srb_p_600_599_75_22_0.50_1.20_0 3b2277_5ca8aa4bf5ec4ff89ca3af0ba31329b1.jpg_srb_p_600_537_75_22_0.50_1.20_0 3b2277_705e97328178433bb8eee7726f6b02a9.jpg_srb_p_600_615_75_22_0.50_1.20_0 3b2277_1dce0f77c1f941c9bd08f75f36287b13.jpg_srb_p_600_615_75_22_0.50_1.20_0 3b2277_2e147e26640f445a9d93a3ba6602f51c.jpg_srb_p_600_615_75_22_0.50_1.20_0

You can see all of her work here, follow along on Instagram or say hi to her on Twitter!

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2585. On Picture Book Translation Rights: An Interview with Curtis Brown's Jonathan Lyons and Sarah Perillo

I'm thrilled that my books have been translated into French, Spanish, Japanese and Chinese, and am grateful to the Curtis Brown Translation Rights department for all their help. Jonathan Lyons and Sarah Perillo have kindly agreed to answer a few questions for me about the picture book translation rights process at Curtis Brown.

Jonathan Lyons represents a select list of authors of biographies, history, science, pop culture, sports, general narrative non-fiction, mysteries, thrillers, science fiction and fantasy, and young adult fiction, in addition to serving as subagent in the United States for several agencies in the UK. Having previously run translation rights at McIntosh & Otis and Folio Literary Management, Jonathan currently oversees Curtis Brown’s translation rights department. Jonathan is also a licensed publishing attorney, a member of The Authors Guild, and an adjunct professor at New York University’s Master of Science in Publishing Program, where he teaches a course on contract negotiation.

Sarah Perillo has worked in Curtis Brown's translation rights department since May 2013. She also assists Jonathan and runs the agency's social media accounts. She studied English and Spanish literature at George Washington University and now lives in Manhattan. In addition to her continued work in translation rights, Sarah is building her own list. She hopes to connect with writers from a variety of genres, including adult literary and commercial fiction, speculative fiction, horror, mysteries, and select thrillers and YA—and in all of those, she looks for an engaging, layered protagonist and a strong command of narrative voice. In non-fiction she’s interested in history, politics, social issues, and natural history, with a particular fondness for anything involving animals or food.

Photo: Ginger Knowlton (my awesome literary agent)

Q. When you've sold translation rights for a picture book, is it usually because you've taken the book to an event like Bologna or because publishers have approached you?

We most often secure deals by pitching our clients’ works to foreign publishers, whether directly or through our co-agents in each territory. These pitches primarily take place in meetings we have with publishers in our office or at book fairs like Bologna and Frankfurt, or over email or by phone. However, some sales are secured through publishers approaching us, typically because their scout has recommended the title to them.

Q. Do you hire translators or does the foreign publisher handle the actual translation?

The foreign publisher will hire a translator.

Q. What are some challenges you encounter when selling translation rights to picture books?

Both the subject matter and the overall look must be something that matches with the culture of the market in which we are trying to sell the work in order to have success. As you might imagine, there are many wonderful picture books on the market in the United States that discuss uniquely American experiences that will have little resonance abroad. Too, some markets prefer a more classic look when it comes to illustrations, while others prefer a more modern styling. And even when the tone and look of a picture book could work abroad, we still face the challenge of securing a deal in a highly competitive marketplace, especially in Europe where there is often a strong preference for works from resident authors and illustrators.

Q. What are the strongest picture book markets in translation at the moment?

The Korean market has historically been the most vibrant market for translated picture books, and this continues to be the case today. However, the Chinese market has grown significantly, and the Japanese market is quite strong as well. We also often have success in Western Europe, Brazil and Mexico, depending on the specific picture book title.

Q. What exactly happens at book fairs like Bologna and Frankfurt?

We spend the week meeting with editors from around the world, hearing about what kinds of projects they’re seeking and pitching the books on our list that we think might be a good fit. We also meet with our co-agents from each territory to discuss general market trends and some particulars of our collaboration. Fairs are often the only times we get to meet face-to-face with the people we work closely with over email during the rest of the year. It’s the best chance to build relationships with overseas colleagues and really convey our passion, in person, for the titles we represent.

But there’s a huge amount of work that happens before we even arrive at the fairs. Publishers and scouts start reaching out with meeting requests between three and four months in advance, and there’s always a bit of a scramble for free slots as word gets out that other people have started scheduling already. This year we received our first Frankfurt meeting request in mid-June, and about a week into July our schedule was booked solid (we have 132 appointments over six days planned at the moment, barring any last-minute requests or cancellations.)

While that’s going on, we also have to start pulling our rights lists together. These are lists of all the books, either recently published or coming out in the next year or so, for which we’re handling translation rights. The lists are split up by age group—we have one list for adult fiction and nonfiction, one for YA and middle grade, and a third for picture books. Also, because Curtis Brown is 101 years old, we bring a separate list for many of our backlist tiles. For each book on the lists we need a summary, an author bio, cover art, and any good publicity the book has received, such as reviews, award nominations, and other subsidiary rights sales, like film or television rights. Finally, we list translation rights sales we’ve made for each book, as well as sales for previous titles by the author. This lets publishers know which of our books are available in their territory, as well as the possibility of there being an option on the new work.

Of course, in order to pitch them we read all the books on our lists! That is the most fun part.

In the last month before the fair, we take meetings with scouts at our office here in New York. It gives everyone an early idea of what some of the biggest upcoming titles will be, and it gives us a chance to build buzz for our books and fine-tune our pitches.

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2586. Illustrating “The Hole Story of Kirby the Sneak and Arlo the True”

Summary: This blog post covers a book project that I worked on from the end of 2014 to the beginning of 2105. I was hired to create a cover illustration and a number of black and white interior illustrations for the book The Hole Story of Kirby the Sneak and Arlo the True.

via Studio Bowes Art Blog at http://ift.tt/1h8AfKg

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2587. Three Day Wedding and Uncle Fred

A good friend of ours here bestowed a really sweet honor onto Fred. She asked him to be her "uncle" at her wedding. The uncle presents trays of offerings to the groom's family (the groom also has an "uncle" who does the same for the bride's family). The wedding took place over 3 days. Here are some highlights. 


Jess heading to the wedding. She had to change saris 5 times during the ceremony. This is sari number one. Gorgeous, right?


The trays being prepared with sweets, fruits, perfume and a sari. 


Me and "Uncle" Fred before the ceremony. That sari took two friends about 40 minutes to put on me. It's one big long piece of cloth, wrapped, pleated, tucked and draped- and held in place by a lot of safety pins. 


After a 3 hour ceremony, the couple walking 7 times around the  center alter - and then , they were married!


One of the after parties. The final dance was a sega dance (the traditional music/dance style of Mauritius).

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2588. Freckles - Charcoal



Charcoal on paper - 8" x 10"

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2589. "Secondaries" as Primaries

In yesterday's post about charting limited palettes, I mentioned that the colors you choose for your palette don’t have to be blue, red, and yellow.


Autochrome by Louis Lumière"Madeleine, Suzanne et Andrée à travers les vignes"
You can use what we think of as "secondaries,"orange, green, and violet—as primaries and come up with very interesting color schemes. The Autochrome process, an early form of color photography, did just that.
Jean-Baptiste Tournassoud ( French, 1866 - 1951); Le Phonographe;
Autochrome, circa 1912 courtesy the 
Photography Museum
Autochromes used grains of potato starch dyed red-orange, green, and blue-violet.

Through a magnifier (below), the individual colored grains are visible (left courtesy PhotographyMuseum.com, right courtesy Univ Delaware).


I'm not sure how accurate the color in these examples are. The one on the left looks Photoshopped to pump the colors, and the one on the right looks yellowed. But you get the idea.

Yellows are mixed from orange and green, similar to the way they're mixed from red and green in computer screens and theater lights. Yellows are the are the hard color to achieve this way, because they come out weak and low value, so they have to be tinted up with white, and at best they'll be sort of beige.

But the experience of building a color scheme where the colors we think of as "primaries" have to be mixed from "secondaries" is a strange exercise that will rewire your color brain.

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2590. i got the blogging blues

 
No matter how many good intentions I have, I just can't keep  my blogging up. I sometimes even forget it's here. I can Facebook, Tweet, Instagram and even Flickr, but I just can't get into a blogging habit. 
Here, I bring you some flowers to apologise. Thanks to those of you who still visit. I'm not sure why you would. I hardly ever seem to. For those of you who keep up with yours; HOW do you do it?
Flowers for sale HERE

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2591. The caveats of working at home

The good news is I get to work at home and set my own schedule.

The bad news is I get to work at home and set my own schedule.

I have tried so many times to get my work time in the studio onto a set schedule. Once in a while I've been able to actually walk into the studio at 8 or 9 AM and not break for anything until  4 or 5 PM, a normal workday for most people. When you work at home and your studio is right behind your house, it might seem like an easy task to be able to just walk out of your house and go to work, but it never seems to be just that way.



As I write this, I have my husbands car at Maaco for a repair. It's 10 AM. Prior to this, I had to clean my house and get ready to host our AirBnB guests who are arriving this evening. Tomorrow, I have to take my car at 10 AM for an oil change. There always seems to be something, whether it's shopping that needs to be done or errands or doctors appointments or things that just can't happen in the evening, that always seem to cut into my workday.



And then there is the inevitable pile of dirty dishes or the laundry that you tried to ignore to go to the studio and do your work FIRST but it's sitting there staring you in the face every time you come into the house to get a drink of water screeching "WASH ME,  do something about me, sweep the floor for crying out loud!" and inside you're head you're saying, "But I can't, I can't, I'm an artist I have to make pottery and  I have to work, I have to paint!" I try not to succumb until I have made some art but it's a never-ending battle!


 So like today, I probably won't get into the studio and be able to actually get busy with my work until 11 AM or 12 PM. With any luck, I'll get four solid hours of work done before I have to break to make dinner for my husband. I could go back out to the studio after that, but when I don't see him all day we want to spend time together. (Yes, after 24 years of marriage, we still like each other)

I'm not complaining. It's a luxury for me to be able to be an artist and work at home because Lord knows, it doesn't pay the bills. It's just that sometimes I think it's easier to get up get dressed and get in your car to go somewhere else where you have no other distractions but the work that you have to do.


Even though I always feel like I am being pulled in different directions and never have enough hours in the day, I manage to get quite a lot done. One day has passed since I started writing this. I spent my afternoon glazing yesterday and I am firing a full kiln at this moment. I realized that because my studio will be one of the stops on the Chester County Best Kept Secrets Tour, there will be 16 days in November when I would normally still be making things for holiday sales when my studio will have to be all spiffed up and clean for the tour and I won't be able to throw mud around. That means that I have to have all of my holiday inventory made in October.




So I am throwing like a mad woman and making plans for some new paintings and would really like to create a "Millicent and the Faraway Moon Coloring Book" to add to my growing collection of books that I have authored and created. So far, the kiln is full of very affordable items in the $20 range, which I plan to have a lot of on hand throughout the holidays like ring bowls and dip spreaders, tea lights, soap dishes and cereal bowls. There are also a lot of yarn bowls firing right now, an item I need a large stock of because it is my biggest holiday seller.



I have been all about butterflies this summer and I am doing a lot of hand painting with butterflies on what will be wall hangings and plates. I am also making really cute hand painted cake plates, flower plates and flower bowls with stems that act as pedestals. Naturally, the hand-painted items will have to be  a little more expensive as they take me more time to produce.


I am also having a lot of fun making miniature ceramic houses. These would make great housewarming gifts or look cute in a terrarium or just on a shelf. While the kiln fires, it is time to do some more painting on bisque and after that it will be time to start taking photos of new pieces  for uploading to my website and then writing the listings for each one.  Blogging and using social media is the only marketing I do right now and is also a huge time suck.

We'll see how far I get today. Always much to do and never enough time to do it -especially when you're a one-woman band like me. :0)

Photo borrowed from "The Blue Lantern"




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2592. The Freedom To Read: Free, print-ready poster of one of my favorite Judy Blume quotes #BannedBooksWeek

 

In honor of Banned Books Week, I've illustrated one of my favorite Judy Blume quotes:

"Having the freedom to read and the freedom to choose is one of the best gifts my parents ever gave me."

I was lucky that way, too. My father used to take the whole family to our local public library every week, and we kids could choose whatever books we wanted. My parents never questioned my choices, and I will always be grateful to them for that trust.

You can download a free, print-ready poster here.

Also see my Print-Ready Archives as well as my Illustrating Judy Blume resource.

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2593. What have you published.... lately?


I guess one of the hazards of being a children's book maker is having to always answer questions from people who you haven't seen in a long while. "Are you still doing that children's book thing?".  To which I say Ah... why yes!  As a matter of fact that's been my chosen profession for many decades now and I still do, yes thank you very much.  The other dreaded question is "What have you published.... lately?"  With the emphasis being on the 'lately'.  That one can be a bit trickier.  

My feeling is like isn't it enough that one has published more than 50 books - but you have to answer to the 'lately' question also? 

Usually I just say 'Oh I'm working on some illustrations about a rabbit or a fox' - which applies to a large portion of my working life.  But really I mostly squirm at the question. Maybe I need a license plate that says 'CHLDNSBKART' or something.  Or a theme Tee shirt to the same effect. But alas, I have neither.

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2594. Madonna Davidoff at CBIG ( Childrens Book Illustrators Group) illustrator Directory

My colored illustration and as a member and 
former officer of CBIG (Childrens Book Illustrators Group) based in New York City,
 I am included in the CBIG Illustration directory. 


Here is my colored Promo page:




It can be viewed at the CBIG ( Childrens Book Illustrators Group) website below:

(Madonna Davidoff on page 30)





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2595. The Story I’ll Paint: Part 1 – Getting Started

The countdown begins for publication of The Story I’ll Tell, set for release on November first. In celebration, I thought it might be fun to do a series of posts about the process of making the illustrations.

So, without further ado, I’ll start from the beginning.

Story-ill-tell-advance-copy

Once upon a time, I woke up as usual, had my coffee breakfast, and got to work when—ping!— an email arrived in my inbox. (It didn’t actually go “ping,” but that seems like a nice idea.) It was from an editor asking if I might be interested in working on a picture book. It sounded promising! Emails were exchanged, manuscripts sent and read, deadlines were set, and contracts negotiated and signed.  After the whirlwind of activity and excitement settled, it was time to sit down, put pencil to paper, and do what might be the most important part of illustrating a picture book: getting started.

With The Story I’ll Tell, I was fortunate to have a lovely manuscript. Ideas jumped up in my mind, begging for attention. I started sketching and writing down notes, and created a folder where I collected evocative images from magazines and the Internet. Where did the characters live? What culture were they from? What kind of world did I want the reader to step into? These were some of the many questions that had to be explored.

Photograph of a pile of papers with hundreds of thumbnail sketches

After the initial brainstorming, it was time to start planning out the book with thumbnails. Some pages were clear in my mind while others were harder to pin down. After seemingly endless rounds of sketches, I sent in a complete set…

…and soon after, received my first round of detailed feedback from my editor and art director. Lots of feedback. For the uninitiated, it can be difficult to adjust to so many notes and suggestions. But at every round of revision, my art director and editor pushed me to make the book into something far better than I could have ever achieved alone, and I’m so glad they did.

Some pages didn’t change much at all:

Dragon-queen-before-after1

…while other pages changed quite a lot:

Airport-thumbnails

This isn't even close to all the variations of this page.

By the end of the initial planning phase, I had drawn hundreds of thumbnails. The vast majority ended up in the reject pile. In the case above we ended up changing the text slightly in order to change the setting of the illustration. Once we had the basic concept down, it was time to start working out all the details.

Coming in part two: Finding a harmonious composition.
Other posts in the series:
  • Part 1 – Getting Started
  • Part 2 – Finding Harmony
  • Part 3 – Devil’s in the Details
  • Part 4 – Adding the Magic
  • Part 5 – Painting with Guts

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2596. Artist of the Day: Baptiste Virot

Discover the work of Baptiste Virot, Cartoon Brew's Artist of the Day!

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2597. Peanutized

Everybody is uploading pictures of themselves as Peanuts characters, so I had to try too. Man, this Peanutized app is spot-on!


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2598. Book Expo coming up in 2 weeks time

I'll be giving Book Expo a go this year.
Its the 17th and 18th of October at Sydney Olympic park.
i know Dave Hackett will be there and the Christmas Press people...

If you are interested it should potentially cost nothing to come along because I was allocated 150 free tickets- (way more than my  # of facebook friends).

How to get the free tickets?

Use the coupon code ‘lach’
"on the website,
 following the ‘buy tickets’ link on the top right hand corner of the site, you reach a checkout with a coupon slot. After applying the code and finalising a $0.00 purchase, the tickets are sent to the email address as a pdf, which can either be printed, or scanned from a device."

http://www.bookexpoaustralia.com/

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2599. The Story I’ll Paint: Part 1 – Getting Started

The countdown begins for publication of The Story I’ll Tell, set for release on November first. In celebration, I thought it might be fun to do a series of posts about the process of making the illustrations.

So, without further ado, I’ll start from the beginning.

Story-Ill-Tell-studio

Once upon a time, I woke up as usual, had my coffee breakfast, and got to work when—ping!— an email arrived in my inbox. (It didn’t actually go “ping,” but that seems like a nice idea.) It was from an editor asking if I might be interested in working on a picture book. It sounded promising! Emails were exchanged, manuscripts sent and read, deadlines were set, and contracts negotiated and signed.  After the whirlwind of activity and excitement settled, it was time to sit down, put pencil to paper, and do what might be the most important part of illustrating a picture book: getting started.

With The Story I’ll Tell, I was fortunate to have a lovely manuscript. Ideas jumped up in my mind, begging for attention. I started sketching and writing down notes, and created a folder where I collected evocative images from magazines and the Internet. Where did the characters live? What culture were they from? What kind of world did I want the reader to step into? These were some of the many questions that had to be explored.

Photograph of a pile of papers with hundreds of thumbnail sketches

After the initial brainstorming, it was time to start planning out the book with thumbnails. Some pages were clear in my mind while others were harder to pin down. After seemingly endless rounds of sketches, I sent in a complete set…

…and soon after, received my first round of detailed feedback from my editor and art director. Lots of feedback. For the uninitiated, it can be difficult to adjust to so many notes and suggestions. But at every round of revision, my art director and editor pushed me to make the book into something far better than I could have ever achieved alone, and I’m so glad they did.

Some pages didn’t change much at all:

Dragon-queen-before-after1

…while other pages changed quite a lot:

Airport-thumbnails

This isn't even close to all the variations of this page.

By the end of the initial planning phase, I had drawn hundreds of thumbnails. The vast majority ended up in the reject pile. In the case above we ended up changing the text slightly in order to change the setting of the illustration. Once we had the basic concept down, it was time to start working out all the details.

Coming in part two: Finding a harmonious composition.
Other posts in the series:
  • Part 1 – Getting Started
  • Part 2 – Finding Harmony
  • Part 3 – Devil’s in the Details
  • Part 4 – Adding the Magic
  • Part 5 – Painting with Guts

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2600. Ken Duncan Talks About Creating New Scenes for ‘The Iron Giant: Signature Edition’

"The Iron Giant: Signature Edition," director Brad Bird's remastered masterpiece of war, peace, and paranoia, returns to theaters this Wednesday and Sunday, with new scenes courtesy of Duncan Studio.

0 Comments on Ken Duncan Talks About Creating New Scenes for ‘The Iron Giant: Signature Edition’ as of 9/29/2015 2:56:00 PM
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