What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Posts

(from the Bookseller category)

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
<<August 2015>>
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
      01
02030405060708
09101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts from the Bookseller category, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 26 - 50 of 16,468
26. Readerly Term No. 016: Shelf-Righteous

True or false: it's okay to be arrogant — when it comes to one's book collection? ÷ ÷ ÷ Have you invented a Readerly Term of your own? Email us at readerlyterms@powells.com with the word and definition, and we'll consider including it in our Compendium. Browse all the terms here.

0 Comments on Readerly Term No. 016: Shelf-Righteous as of 8/19/2015 10:36:00 AM
Add a Comment
27. Audrey's Tree House by Jenny Hughes & Jonathan Bently

I love tree houses. Who doesn't? For me, tree houses, along with window seats, are those things from my childhood that seemed like magical places where a kid could go to get away from the world. They were magical to me because, growing up in a city and living in an apartment, they seemed largely unattainable. Yet, they posses the transformative power of an enchanted wardrobe or mirror.

0 Comments on Audrey's Tree House by Jenny Hughes & Jonathan Bently as of 8/19/2015 4:48:00 AM
Add a Comment
28. DINOBLOCK by Christopher Franceschelli, art by Peskimo, 96 pp, RL: ALL AGES

If you had the good fortune to read Alphablock and Countablock by Christopher Franceschelli and the husband and wife design team Peskimo, then you don't need to keep reading this review of their newest book, Dinoblock, because you know you need to buy this book now. If you haven't seen these brilliant, beautiful, completely engaging books, get your hands on them! Get two, actually,

0 Comments on DINOBLOCK by Christopher Franceschelli, art by Peskimo, 96 pp, RL: ALL AGES as of 8/19/2015 4:48:00 AM
Add a Comment
29. Whose Truck? by Toni Buzzeo & Jim Datz

Earlier this year I reviewed Whose Tools? by Toni Buzzeo and illustrated by Jim Datz. I loved Whose Tools? for the subject, something kids love but also something there are few picture books about, and for the wonderful illustrations and engaging gatefolds opening to show the tools at work. Whose Truck? brings us the same great format and text - a guessing game - along with a subject

0 Comments on Whose Truck? by Toni Buzzeo & Jim Datz as of 8/19/2015 4:48:00 AM
Add a Comment
30. Ask a Book Buyer: Dragons!

At Powell's, our book buyers select all the new books in our vast inventory. If we need a book recommendation, we turn to our team of resident experts. Need a gift idea for a fan of vampire novels? Looking for a guide that will best demonstrate how to knit argyle socks? Need a book for [...]

0 Comments on Ask a Book Buyer: Dragons! as of 8/18/2015 7:52:00 PM
Add a Comment
31. Just Passing Through: Embracing the Covered Wagon Mind-Set

When people learn that I recently spent a long summer riding 2,000 miles across the Oregon Trail in a covered wagon pulled by mules, they invariably ask the same question: "How did the adventure change you?" Unspoken, but deep implications are embedded in that question, especially from family and friends. Maybe I have stopped drinking [...]

0 Comments on Just Passing Through: Embracing the Covered Wagon Mind-Set as of 8/18/2015 3:00:00 PM
Add a Comment
32. Hamster Princess: Harriet the Invincible by Ursula Vernon, 247 pp., RL 3

Ursula Vernon is the author of the excellent, comic hybrid Dragonbreath series (Book 11 comes out January, 2016!) and the superb stand alone novel, Castle Hangnail. Vernon is a triple threat when it comes to kid's books. She is a great illustrator who makes creepy cute on every page. She is an imaginative author, always adding to the fantasy genre. And, best of all, she is a very funny

0 Comments on Hamster Princess: Harriet the Invincible by Ursula Vernon, 247 pp., RL 3 as of 8/18/2015 4:22:00 AM
Add a Comment
33. The Tenderness of Thieves by Donna Freitas

The Tenderness of Thieves by Donna Freitas is the tale of Jane and her seventeenth summer - and of the tragic crime which happened just months before, in February, when Jane was in the wrong place at the wrong time. Though pelted with summer sun and surrounded by a supportive mother, three close friends, and one very interesting boy, Jane cannot escape the shadow of that night, with details revealed in short bursts throughout the novel, shared between chapters.

It is difficult for me to review this book without spoiling it, because what I most want to discuss is the big reveal, something I predicted immediately upon reading the summary on the book jacket. What complicates this story for me and what accounts for my reaction to the ending isn't only because I could see the ending coming, but also because I have a strong reaction to those who actively withhold the truth from others. Please note that I am not referring to the narrator here; Jane is not an unreliable narrator in any way. She tells her story in first person past tense throughout the book, and she's very honest.

What I will tell you openly is this: I liked the book overall because of how it was written. The narration relates the protagonist's emotions and thoughts very well, ensuring that important moments and decisions are deeply felt. The title is perfect, the pacing is good, and the characters are clear. I will not be surprised if and when this book is made into a movie, because the story will translate easily to film. (If you're looking for a screenwriter, I'm available!)

I also want to give kudos to cover designer Danielle Calotta for giving the title text angles and energy that I think Saul Bass would appreciate, layered over an image which well-captures both the beach setting and the lonely, haunted girl. (Image attributed to Shutterstock; name of artist or piece unknown.) Those who like the sand between their toes will enjoy the many scenes that take place at the beach, and how Jane and her mother welcome the sand into their home.

Put The Tenderness of Thieves in the hands of those who like books by Sarah Dessen and Deb Caletti, and especially those who like Tara Altebrando (The Pursuit of Happiness, What Happens Here).

My favorite passages in this book include:

I was holding things together the best I could, leaning into my new visibility like it might prop me up. But it's dangerous when we let boys fix the broken parts within us. It makes us vulnerable. It scars us for life. - Page 5

A camera catching the split second when a girl suddenly becomes someone worth seeing. - Page 67

The beach, swimming, everything around me was magic. It could heal all things. Protect me from danger. - Page 100

"It's not your job to save anyone," she said. "Not even if you fall in love with them." - Page 185

"...because little girls should start out life with auspicious names so they could one day grow up to be young women who would make their own marks on the world." - Page 253

"...I imagined the possibility...a chameleon of a girl who morphed and shifted with each new significant experience, one of them tragic, certainly, but others surprising, even thrilling. I liked this thought, that I didn't have to be defined by tragedy, that though sadness and loss might be written onto my skin, there were other things that could be written over it..." - Page 280

Related posts at Bildungsroman:
Review: This Gorgeous Game by Donna Freitas
Review: Gold Medal Summer by Donna Freitas
Interview: Donna Freitas (2012)
Interview: Donna Freitas (2010)

Add a Comment
34. All Shook Up! and Who's There? by Alain Crozon

My kids, in fact, all the kids in my extended family, are well beyond the age to enjoy board books. But I still really love reading a good board book. It brings a smile to my face and, if it's a superior board book, it entertains me. Who's There and All Shook Up, Alain Crozon's two new (to America) board books with flaps to lift and wiggle are entertaining, surprising, and filled with

0 Comments on All Shook Up! and Who's There? by Alain Crozon as of 8/17/2015 3:58:00 AM
Add a Comment
35. The Baby-Sitters Club: Kristy's Great Idea, based on the novel by Ann M. Martin, graphic art by Raina Telgemeier, 180 pp, RL 4

In a brilliant move, Scholastic had Raina Telgemeier turn Ann M. Martin's hugely successful (but gently out of date) series The Baby-Sitters Club into a (black and white) graphic novel in 2006. It took almost 10 years and two best selling graphic novels penned by Telgemeier herself for Scholastic Graphix to add color to the four books in this series, which will be released over the course

0 Comments on The Baby-Sitters Club: Kristy's Great Idea, based on the novel by Ann M. Martin, graphic art by Raina Telgemeier, 180 pp, RL 4 as of 8/17/2015 3:58:00 AM
Add a Comment
36. Readerly Term No. 080: Readultery

Should an overzealous reader feel guilty for two-timing a book? Is consorting with only one book at a time woefully old-fashioned? Is there a correlation between the rise of readultery and our shrinking attention spans? Is social media to blame? Is Obama? ÷ ÷ ÷ Have you invented a Readerly Term of your own? Email [...]

0 Comments on Readerly Term No. 080: Readultery as of 8/14/2015 8:55:00 PM
Add a Comment
37. The Blind Spot of United States History

The most frequent question readers ask about An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States is "Why hasn't this book been written before?" I'm flattered by that question, because it's the one I ask about texts that deeply move me; at the same time the information, argument, or story is new to me, it seems [...]

0 Comments on The Blind Spot of United States History as of 8/14/2015 1:34:00 PM
Add a Comment
38. Poetry Friday: Alien by George William (A.E.) Russell

Dark glowed the vales of amethyst
Beneath an opal shroud:
The moon bud opened through the mist
Its white-fire leaves of cloud.

Through rapt at gaze with eyes of light
Looked forth the seraph seers,
The vast and wandering dream of night
Rolled on above our tears.

- Alien by George William (A.E.) Russell

View all posts tagged as Poetry Friday at Bildungsroman.

View the roundup schedule at A Year of Reading.

Learn more about Poetry Friday.

Add a Comment
39. The Meanest Birthday Girl by Josh Schneider, RL: 1.5

 I reviewed the picture book Everybody Sleeps (But Not Fred) by Josh Schneider earlier this year and LOVED it. Schneider is a hilarious author and a hilarious illustrator, as his rhyming story about Fred, who has a "to-do list you wouldn't believe," proves. Fred needs to stay awake to do things like practice his karate chops and warm up for a yelling contest while animals from all over

0 Comments on The Meanest Birthday Girl by Josh Schneider, RL: 1.5 as of 8/14/2015 5:28:00 AM
Add a Comment
40. Fowl Play by Travis Nichols

I LOVE Fowl Play by Travis Nichols!!! A graphic novel-style picture book, Fowl Play is filled with a fantastic cast of animals, a crime and a great detective agency that goes by the name, "Gumshoe Zoo." And Fowl Play is packed with non-stop idioms. Idioms! In a picture book! And it totally works! I can't wait for school to start so I can read Fowl Play over and over to my students. I also

0 Comments on Fowl Play by Travis Nichols as of 8/13/2015 4:48:00 AM
Add a Comment
41. Wind/Pinball

Murakami's first two novels never saw wide English-language distribution and have long been out of print. Now packaged together as Wind/Pinball, the books are finally available again and include a new introduction by the author. These remarkable stories serve as a coming of age, not just for their characters but for Murakami as well. Books [...]

0 Comments on Wind/Pinball as of 8/12/2015 2:42:00 PM
Add a Comment
42. Street Poison

Street Poison is an illuminating portrait of the flawed and fascinating life of Iceberg Slim. Though not well known in literary circles, his books have had a profound effect on music, film, and inner-city culture. Gifford, his biographer, crafts a highly readable account of mid-20th-century African American history that feels both timely and relevant. Books [...]

0 Comments on Street Poison as of 8/12/2015 2:42:00 PM
Add a Comment
43. The Secret Place

French's talent for gorgeously crafted psychological mysteries shines in The Secret Place, her latest Dublin Murder Squad installment. The narrative centers on a boy's murder in the gardens of an exclusive girls' school, but its real drama is in the fraught relationships between teenage girls and the awkward partnership of the detectives working the case. [...]

0 Comments on The Secret Place as of 8/12/2015 2:42:00 PM
Add a Comment
44. Playful Pigs from A to Z by Anita Lobel

Anita Lobel is a picture book illustrator and author from my childhood. Her illustrations are instantly recognizable to me and immediately evocative of another time and place. Her books were worlds that I got lost in when I was a child. My absolute favorite, Under a Mushroom, published in 1970, is out of print but I still have my copy! Anita Lobel's picture books are often quiet and

0 Comments on Playful Pigs from A to Z by Anita Lobel as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
45. A Pig, A Fox and a Box by Jonathan Fenske, RL: 1

A Pig, a Fox, and a Box by Jonathan Fenske is a great book for a reader who is just beginning to take off. One thing I especially like about the Puffin Young Readers books, of which A Pig, a Fox, and a Box is one, is the very detailed information  in the book and on the website that lets parents know specifically what level this reader is. The are SO MANY leveled readers being published

0 Comments on A Pig, A Fox and a Box by Jonathan Fenske, RL: 1 as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
46. Felicia Day’s Playlist for You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost)

These songs go along with some of the chapters in my book You're Never Weird on the Internet (Almost). Hope you enjoy! 1. "Sooner or Later" by Madonna As a kid I grew up in major isolation, so I never was crazy about boy bands like kids my age should be. I was obsessed with [...]

0 Comments on Felicia Day’s Playlist for You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
47. The Marriage of Opposites

Hoffman's novels are storytelling magic. Set on an island in the Caribbean, this beautifully written and engrossing tale of family and forbidden love is an enchanting portrait of a headstrong woman who defies her community to follow her heart. Books mentioned in this post The Marriage of Opposites Alice Hoffman Sale Hardcover $19.59

0 Comments on The Marriage of Opposites as of 8/12/2015 2:42:00 PM
Add a Comment
48. Reawakened

In the first book of a wild new adventure series by local author Colleen Houck, Lilliana encounters a dashing Egyptian prince and they travel back in time to battle ancient gods and mythical creatures. This is a sure bet for a summer read! Books mentioned in this post Reawakened Colleen Houck Sale Hardcover $12.59

0 Comments on Reawakened as of 8/12/2015 2:41:00 PM
Add a Comment
49. Mess

Barry Yourgrau's apartment was filled with sentimental keepsakes from traveling and from his family. True to his style, he began researching clutter, doing interviews, and going to group meetings, but not actually removing anything from his apartment. Eventually he began to work his way through the boxes of his father's books stacked underneath the piano, [...]

0 Comments on Mess as of 8/12/2015 2:41:00 PM
Add a Comment
50. Eli Gottlieb: The Powells.com Interview

Eli Gottlieb has done something unusual — he's written two novels, 20 years apart, from opposing but connected perspectives. The Boy Who Went Away, his first novel, draws from Gottlieb's own childhood to chronicle a young boy's coming of age in a family with a severely disabled, classically autistic brother. It won the American Academy's [...]

0 Comments on Eli Gottlieb: The Powells.com Interview as of 8/12/2015 2:42:00 PM
Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts