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Viewing: Blog Posts from the Bookseller category, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 26 - 50 of 16,260
26. Read Between the Lines by Jo Knowles

A boy with a broken finger who quietly suffers under the weight of his father's cruel words. A girl desperate to fit in. The teenage boy who dates a girl in public and a boy in private. A young man who is counting the days until he's 21. A teacher struggling to get her students' respect.

Read Between the Lines by Jo Knowles tells all these stories and more. The book contains ten short stories total, with each character's tale roughly 40 pages long. The storylines overlap and connect, woven together by setting - all of the stories take place in the same town, on the same day - as strangers, neighbors, relatives, co-workers and classmates interact, ignore, confront, and combust.

Set aside some time for this book, because once you've finished reading it, you may feel compelled to read it again! If you read this book a second time, you will pick up on even more of the connections, causes, and consequences, just like when you read a mystery for the second time, you pick up on more of the clues because you already know the identity (and intentions) of the murderer.

The author said that this book was inspired by a stranger who flipped off her family while driving down the road. That symbol of disrespect is in each of the stories, which may make some parents or teachers hesitate, but don't be worried - overall, the book is fairly PG.

Read Between the Lines is both frank and considerate, honest in its depiction of emotional abuse, intolerance, secrets, and hierarchies within families, classrooms, and communities. Though they have different backgrounds and different interests, each character is trying to find a place for herself or himself in the world, and there's something universal in that search for identity and belonging. The point of the book is to pause, to think, to consider, to look, to look again: we don't always know what's happened to others to make them act or react the way they do; we can't read their minds, we don't know what their day has been like or what their home situation is, but if we take a moment to consider other people's feelings, to respect their space and hear their side of the story, we might be find we are more alike and more connected that we think.

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27. Poetry Friday: Acquainted with the Night by Robert Frost

I have been one acquainted with the night.
I have walked out in rain - and back in rain.
I have outwalked the furthest city light.

I have looked down the saddest city lane.
I have passed by the watchman on his beat
And dropped my eyes, unwilling to explain.

I have stood still and stopped the sound of feet
When far away an interrupted cry
Came over houses from another street,

But not to call me back or say good-bye;
And further still at an unearthly height,
One luminary clock against the sky

Proclaimed the time was neither wrong nor right.
I have been one acquainted with the night.

- Robert Frost

View all posts tagged as Poetry Friday at Bildungsroman.

View the roundup schedule at A Year of Reading.

Learn more about Poetry Friday.

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28. Amelia's Middle-School Graduation Yearbook by Marissa Moss (except for words and pictures by Amelia) 80pp. RL 5

Wow! It's hard to believe that Marissa Moss's creation, Amelia and her composition book/diary, first hit the shelves 20 years ago! Amelia was not new to me, having just started as a children's bookseller, and having a daughter and a collection of American Girl dolls. Amelia and her notebooks have had a variety of publishers, starting with Tricycle Press. After publishing an excerpt from

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29. The Case of the Missing Carrot Cake by Robin Newman and illustrated by Deborah Zemke, 38 pp, RL 2

The Case of the Missing Carrot Cake by Robin Newman and illustrated by Deborah Zemke is a fantastic new book from Creston Books, a homegrown publisher of books printed in America that launched in Fall of 2013. Of course I love a good story, but I also love a beautifully made book and all of Creston's books fit this bill, as you can glimpse in the photo below, and by taking a look inside The

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30. Powell’s Q&A: Aleksandar Hemon

Describe your latest book. The Making of Zombie Wars is a roller-coaster ride of violence and sex. The main character, Joshua Levin, is a modestly talented wanna-be screenwriter whose day job is teaching English to immigrants and refugees. As the U.S. joyously invades Iraq, Joshua falls for a married Bosnian woman and his sadly stable [...]

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31. Six Things You Can Do to Join the Food Movement Today

People ask me all the time what they can do to help improve the food system. Given that some of the problems that need fixing (like unsustainable agriculture, mistreatment of workers and animals, hunger, and diet-related disease, to name just a few) are so complex, widespread, and downright daunting, it's easy to overlook the things [...]

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32. Happy Book Birthday to MRS NOODLEKUGEL AND DROOLY THE BEAR!

In the hilarious third book in the MRS NOODLEKUGEL series, Nick and Maxine encounter meet, and lose, and have to find, a large and rather... well, DROOLY new friend.

From the publisher: "When their father decides to compete to be speed-knitting champion of the world, Nick and Maxine are happy to stay with their babysitter, Mrs. Noodlekugel, along with her talking cats and four mice who wear glasses. What they don't expect is a dripping-wet, whiskered man in the kitchen the next morning. Captain Noodlekugel has left his seafaring life to train animals for the circus, and he's even brought with him a hefty bear named Drooly for practice. But whenever he tries to teach Drooly to dance, the bear wobbles and falls asleep on the tulips. When Drooly goes missing, the siblings must try to figure out where a big clumsy bear might go!"

Perfect for little kids with big imaginations (or actually any aged people who love a huge dose of funny in their chapter books!) Pinkwater is at the top of his game, and illustrator Adam Stower has outdone himself with his goofy and adorable drawings.

Also, the first two installments of the series are now available in paperback, and each book does stand alone.

Buy the book from your local independent bookstore, Oblong, Powells, Book Depository, Barnes and Noble, Amazon, or wherever find books are sold.

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33. Powell’s Q&A: Chris Hedges

Describe your latest book. Wages of Rebellion looks at the nature of rebellion, those who do it, why they do it, and the price they pay for being a rebel. There are interviews with great rebels, from Julian Assange to Mumia Abu Jamal, who have sacrificed enormously for their resistance. The book posits that these [...]

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34. Powell’s Q&A: Heidi Pitlor

Describe your latest book. My novel, The Daylight Marriage, is about a wife and mother who goes missing one day. The narrative alternates between her husband and children's story, as they try to figure out what's happened to her and the story of what is, in fact, happening to her. The husband is a climate [...]

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35. What This Story Needs is a Pig in a Wig by Emma J. Virján

Being an elementary school librarian has changed how I think (and feel) about books in really positive ways. During the decades that I was a children's bookseller, I had the luxury of being selective and critical with my tastes. Now, of course I am still critical and selective, but I am also more open minded in how I think about a book. What This Book Needs is a Pig in a Wig by Emma Virján is

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36. William and the Missing Masterpiece by Helen Hancocks

William and the Missing Masterpiece is the second picture book from Helen Hanckocks. Her first book, Penguin in Peril, was the biggest selling picture book in the UK last year! Hancocks has a fantastic, wry sense of humor that expresses itself perfectly through her cat and penguin main characters as well as the plots and illustrations of her books. Crime seems to be a theme in Hancocks's

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37. Poetry Friday: The House and the Road by Josephine Preston Peabody

The little Road says, Go,
The little House says, Stay:
And O, it's bonny here at home,
But I must go away.

The little Road, like me,
Would seek and turn and know;
And forth I must, to learn the things
The little Road would show!

And go I must, my dears,
And journey while I may,
Though heart be sore for the little House
That had no word but Stay.

Maybe, no other way
Your child could ever know
Why a little House would have you stay,
When a little Road says, Go.

- The House and the Road by Josephine Preston Peabody

View all posts tagged as Poetry Friday at Bildungsroman.

View the roundup schedule at A Year of Reading.

Learn more about Poetry Friday.

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38. Migloo's Busy Day by William Bee

Migloo's Day is yet another fantastic book from a new favorite of mine, William Bee. With Migloo's Day, Bee creates a cross between a Richard Scarry book and a Where's Waldo look-and-find extravaganza, making himself a character in the book. Bee begins Migloo's Day with an introduction to the more than 65 culturally diverse characters who inhabit Sunnytown. On each page, the

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39. Sweet Stories for Baby: A Boxed Board Book Trilogy

A basketful of board books was always in the backseat of my car and the family room of my house when my kids were little. Between the birth of my first child and my third, the quality and quantity of boards books available changed greatly. I wrote about this as few years ago in, The Changing Face of Board Books and, even though my youngest is ten now, I still get excited when a great new

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40. The Bus is for Us! by Michael Rosen, illustrated by Gillian Tyler

The Bus is for Us! is a jubilant declaration byMichael Rosen, former British Children's Laureate and illustrated by the marvelous  Gillian Tyler. Anyone who has spent the day with a small child knows how much they love all forms of transportation. Rosen's rhyming text pays tribute to all kinds of rides, from a bike ride to a train ride to a sleigh ride - and even a ride on a fish, a kite

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41. Marilyn's Monster by Michelle Knudsen, illustrated by Matt Phelan

Marilyn's Monster by Michelle Knudsen is a superb story perfectly illustrated by Matt Phelan. Phelan's soft watercolor and pencil illustrations tame the monsters that might have been frightening in this story about patience and perseverance. Marilyn's Monster begins, "Some of the kids in Marilyn's class had mosnters. It was the latest thing. Marilyn didn't have a mosnter. Not yet.

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42. The Fragility of Grand Discoveries

When I was in graduate school at Berkeley I was offered a prestigious fellowship to study for a year in Germany, but I decided it would be a disruption, so I wrote a short note declining the offer. As, letter in hand, I stepped to the mailbox, I bumped into a woman from the scholarship [...]

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43. Happy Book Birthday to HOW TO READ A STORY by Kate Messner


Step One: Find a story. (A good one.)
Step Two: Find a reading buddy. (Someone nice.)
Step Three: Find a reading spot. (Couches are cozy.)
Now: Begin.


Storytellers Kate Messner and Mark Siegel chronicle the process of becoming a reader: from pulling a book off the shelf and finding someone with whom to share a story, to reading aloud, predicting what will happen, and--finally--coming to The End. This picture book playfully and movingly illustrates the idea that the reader who discovers the love of reading finds, at the end, the beginning.

 Ask for HOW TO READ A STORY from your library, or get your own copy at your local independent bookstore, or Oblong, or Bookstore Plus, or anywhere fine books are sold! 

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44. Happy Book Birthday to Lois Lane: FALLOUT!

A YA novel about Lois Lane as a modern teen reporter? By the amazing Gwenda Bond? Um... YES PLEASE!

Lois Lane is starting a new life in Metropolis. An Army brat, Lois has lived all over--and seen all kinds of things. (Some of them defy explanation, like the near-disaster she witnessed in Kansas in the middle of one night.) But now her family is putting down roots in the big city, and Lois is determined to fit in. Stay quiet. Fly straight. As soon as she steps into her new high school, though, she can see it won't be that easy. Agroup known as the Warheads is making life miserable for another girl at school. They're messing with her mind, somehow, via the high-tech immersive videogame they all play. Not cool. Armed with her wit and her new snazzy job as a reporter, Lois has her sights set on solving this mystery. But sometimes it's all a bit much. Thank goodness for her maybe-more-than-a friend, a guy she knows only by his screenname, SmallvilleGuy . . .

KIRKUS *starred review*: "A nifty investigative mystery akin to Veronica Mars or Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Readers are in for a treat. A spectacular prose start for DC Comics' spectacular lady.

"Lois Lane has always been one of my favorite characters in American literature. Who is this human, un-powered woman who so easily stands up beside the most iconic superhero of all time? Gwenda Bond's book asks, who was Lois as a teenager? The answer is a spirited, engrossing story that kept me flipping pages and rooting for stubborn, clever, fearless Lois Lane."  -- Shannon Hale, NYT bestselling author of Dangerous and Princess Academy

BUY THE BOOK: At your local independent bookstore, Powells, Barnes and Noble, Book Depository, Amazon, or wherever fine books are sold. 

And check out this lovely letter from Editor Beth, who helped Gwenda bring her version of Lois to the world.

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45. Best Books of April 2015

April 2015: 2 books and scripts read

With much of April spent onstage, backstage, and on sound stages, I did not have a lot of time to read. (Or sleep, but what else is new?)

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46. The Book of Strange New Things

Full disclosure: I was mourning a very recent loss when I read Michel Faber's latest (and I'm told, last) novel, so the effect it had on me may have been amplified by my own grief. Still, this book carved a hole in me the way really good books do, and I don't think it's just [...]

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47. Interview: Courtney Summers

I first interviewed author Courtney Summers in 2008, shortly before her debut novel Cracked Up to Be was released. Seven years, five novels, and many tweets, Tumblr Q&As, and short stories later, her latest novel All the Rage is all the buzz, as is the #tothegirls campaign, which Courtney launched via Thunderclap on April 14th to remind girls everywhere that they are seen, heard and loved.

During her blog tour, I threw three questions Courtney's way. It was difficult, but somehow, I managed to resist the urge to ask her about her love for Pollito, the chicken in Despicable Me 2.

What inspired you to create #ToTheGirls?

I write for and about girls because I believe girls and their stories matter. I think we should take and make every opportunity we can to tell them so.

When you were a kid, were there any books or characters that you connected with strongly?

When I was a kid, I was obsessed with The Baby­-Sitters Club. I was so obsessed they inspired me to start baby­sitting . . . and that was not as fun as the novels led me to believe.

BUT. Those girls were so cool, so any time I could recognize a trait that I shared with any of the characters - from Claudia’s drawing (I loved to draw when I was younger) and her junk food obsession, to Mallory’s writing, to Kristy’s bossiness - I was thrilled beyond words. I felt like I could be as cool as them. Those books had such a positive impact on me and fueled my love of reading.

What's your favorite feature of the Supernatural Clue board game?

I love this question! My favourite part of the Supernatural Clue game is playing as Dean.And then taking it really personally when any of the other characters let him down by being whodunit. Especially if it’s Sam! :)

BONUS: Here's a little quote from ALL THE RAGE...



Follow the blog tour + learn more about Courtney Summers at her website.

Related posts at Bildungsroman:
Interview: Courtney Summers (2008)
Book Review: Cracked Up to Be by Courtney Summers
Book Review: Fall for Anything by Courtney Summers
Book Review: This is Not a Test by Courtney Summers
What Makes Courtney Summers Smile
So You Want to Read YA? Booklist by Little Willow at Stacked

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48. Star Wars Epic Yarns: A New Hope, The Empire Strikes Back & Return of the Jedi by Jack and Holman Wang

Of course there is a specific market for Star Wars: Epic Yarns, the trilogy of books by twins Jack and Holman Wang, creators of Cozy Classics. However, this happens to be a very large market - one that has raised their children and grandchildren with these movies as part of their lives. Why am I reviewing these books? I was one of those people who stood in line, more than once, as a child to

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49. WHOSE TOOLS? by Tony Buzzeo & Jim Datz

Whose Tools? by Toni Buzzeo and Jim Datz is flat-out brilliant. A large-sized board book, each page uses rhyming riddles to ask the question, "Whose tools are those?" The right hand page opens to answer the question, showing a spread of workers using the tools in question. There are 24 tools in all - many more than you may even know the names of yourself. And, the people using the tools are

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50. Spots in a Box by Helen Ward

I had no idea that Helen Ward, author of two of my favorite picture books: The Tin Forest & The Dragon Machine is also an illustrator! These books, along with two others, Finding Christmas, which is a very sweet sibling story, and Little Moon Dog, are illustrated by the magnificent Wayne Anderson. I am so happy to make this discovery, especially with Ward's newest book, Spots

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