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Mainly reviews of children's and young adult literature. Primarily focuses on new literature, 2004-present, but may feature older titles if they are "favorites" of mine. Feel free to leave comments. I always enjoy reading what others have to say!
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1. Movie Month, day 18

So Kailana (The Written Word) and I really LOVED participating in Jenni Elyse's 30 Days of Books. We thought it would be fun to do a movie-theme list of questions!

Today's question:  What is your favorite movie series?

Definitely the Lord of the Rings trilogy the extended edition.

I also really love the Marvel movies. Particularly, I love all three Captain America movies and the two Thor movies. (The Avenger movies are good. And I did like Iron Man 3. Ant Man was a surprise delight!)

The Hunger Games series was very, very good.

I like many of the Star Trek movies, though not all.

I've already mentioned the Dark Knight trilogy.





© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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2. Five Children on the Western Front

Five Children on the Western Front. Kate Saunders. 2014. 318 pages. [Source: Library]

First sentence: The sand at the bottom of the gravel pit shifted and heaved, and out popped the furry brown head of a most extraordinary creature.

Premise/plot: For any reader who has read Five Children And It by E. Nesbit (and its sequels) will want to consider picking up Kate Saunders' Five Children on the Western Front. The book opens in 1914 with the oldest, Cyril, heading off to the Great War. Robert, Anthea, and Jane are grown up as well--mostly. Old enough to be away to school for their final years of education at least! Still at home are Lamb (aka Hilary) and Edie (Edith). On this life-changing day, Edie and Lamb discover (again) the Psammead. Lamb has no memory of the adventures his older siblings had, though he has grown up hearing all about the magic. There is a very happy reunion of sorts. If his being cranky and sarcastic doesn't take away the children's happiness. Soon, however, they realize that something is very wrong. He lacks strength and magical power. He has even lost the ability to be invisible. Edie, his primary companion, makes it her mission to get the answers he needs.

This mission takes most of them to London to visit Old Nurse and their friend the Professor. The Professor has a new, young assistant Ernie Haywood, a soldier who has returned home because of injuries. Anthea is quite smitten!

The book covers the war years.

My thoughts: Wow! Not disappointed at all. Not even a little bit! Loved Edie, the heroine, and loved the "humbling" of "Sammy." It was wonderful to spend time with the Pemberton family yet again. If there is a flaw, it is that we still don't really get to know the parents. Is that a flaw? Perhaps. I personally just loved the kids so much, I didn't care. I think readers are in on the secret--the magic--and the parents aren't and never will be.

Is the book sad? Yes in the same way that Rilla of Ingleside is sad and happy at the same time. In fact, that is the only book that really comes to mind. Both books star characters from series that readers would have grown up reading and loving. Both books cross into the ugliness of war, interrupting a blissful innocence. L. M. Montgomery was brave in that she tackled the subject herself so very soon after the war ended. E. Nesbit was older, and most of books were published before the war. Saunders did a splendid job with this sequel.


© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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3. Movie month, day 17

So Kailana (The Written Word) and I really LOVED participating in Jenni Elyse's 30 Days of Books.  We thought it would be fun to do a movie-theme list of questions!

Today's question: What is your favorite genre? What is your favorite movie in your favorite genre?

My favorite genre. I have two that sometimes overlap. I LOVE musicals. I LOVE period dramas.

Favorite movie in my favorite genre. I could never pick just one. My top ten of historical musicals.

10) Calamity Jane
9) South Pacific
8) Moulin Rouge
7) Singin' in the Rain
6) King and I
5) Holiday Inn
4) My Fair Lady
3) High Society
2) The Sound of Music
1) Music Man 


© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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4. March: Book Three

March Book Three. John Lewis and Andrew Aydin. Illustrated by Nate Powell. 2016. 246 pages. [Source: Library]

First sentence: Y'all better hurry along, now. Sunday School's nearly over, and the main service'll be startin' soon.

Premise/plot: March is the graphic novel autobiography of John Lewis. So far, there are three volumes in this autobiography. Today, I am reviewing book three. It opens in Birminham, Alabama, September 15, 1963, the bombing of a church. This one covers the rest of 1963, 1964, and 1965. The 'past' story line concludes with the 1965 Voting Rights Act becoming a law. The 'current' story line concludes with him deciding to do a graphic novel autobiography.

My thoughts: From start to finish, I personally found this compelling. Not just start to finish book three. Though that is certainly true enough. But start to finish all three books in this autobiography. Even though this third book was longer than the previous two, it didn't feel weighed down by unnecessary elements. If it was weightier in substance--darker, more depressing perhaps--that is for one good reason: it reflects what was happening. The book definitely captures the ongoing struggle of the non-violent fight for freedom: the spirit of determination, the bravery and courage, the stubbornness of men and women and even children taking a stand for something they believed in heart and soul and mind. Yes, this book is violent and bloody, perhaps much more so than the first two volumes even. But it shows readers--of all ages--that this "civil rights movement" was not quick and easy. That it was something that took years--decades even. That it was exhausting. That it took not just a few dozen big names, but hundreds, thousands of people. One can't learn "everything" there is to know about the "civil rights movement" by reading one or two books. This book series showed you how BIG everything was.


© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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5. Movie month, day 16

So Kailana (The Written Word) and I really LOVED participating in Jenni Elyse's 30 Days of Books.  We thought it would be fun to do a movie-theme list of questions! 

Today's question: A soundtrack that you love more than the actual movie...

 I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE, LOVE, LOVE this soundtrack to Jane Eyre. Alessio Vlad & Claudio Capponi.

Others that came to mind:
  • How To Lose A Guy in Ten Days
  • Guardians of the Galaxy
  • Serendipity



© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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6. They All Saw A Cat

They All Saw A Cat. Brendan Wenzel. 2016. Chronicle. 44 pages. [Source: Library]

First sentence: The cat walked through the world, with its whiskers, ears, and paws...and the child saw a CAT, and the dog saw a CAT, and the fox saw a CAT. Yes, they all saw the cat.

Premise/plot: Have you ever wondered how a mouse sees a cat? how a dog sees a cat? how a fish sees a cat? how a bird sees a cat? Brendan Wenzel's picture book plays with young readers' concept of perspective.

My thoughts: I really enjoyed this one. I did. Each spread is unique and interesting. Each reveals how a creature--a flea, a bee, a skunk, a bat, a child--sees a cat. Though it is the same cat, ever creature "sees" a different cat. I'll be honest, the illustrations steal the show. That plus the premise. I would definitely recommend this one.

Text: 4 out of 5
Illustrations: 5 out of 5
Total: 9 out of 10


© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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7. Board Book: There, There

Board Book: There, There. Taro Miura. 2016. Candlewick. 22 pages. [Source: Review copy]

First sentence: Frog says, "Ribbit, ribbit!" Chicken says, "Cluck, cluck!"

Premise/plot: This may at first appear to be a simple, predictable book. (I think of Bing Bong, Riley's imaginary friend!!!) But it has a twist. After the baby goes "wah, wah!" the animals, well, they mix things up a bit! Can the baby restore order in the world?!

My thoughts: I LOVE the twist in this one. It is probably still a little on the predictable side. (The title may just provide the solution.) But it is FUN. It is newly translated into English this year.

Text: 4 out of 5
Illustrations: 4 out of 5
Total: 8 out of 10

© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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8. Movie Month, day 15

So Kailana (The Written Word) and I really LOVED participating in Jenni Elyse's 30 Days of Books.  We thought it would be fun to do a movie-theme list of questions!

Today's question: A movie that disappointed you...

Into the Woods

I love fairy tales. I love musicals. So why didn't I even like this one?! I still don't know this one really didn't work for me. It just didn't.



© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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9. The Plot to Kill Hitler

The Plot to Kill Hitler. Patricia McCormick. 2016. 192 pages. [Source: Library]

First sentence: The Gestapo would arrive any minute.

Premise/plot: Patricia McCormick tells the story of Dietrich Bonhoeffer for elementary-aged readers. It is subtitled pastor, spy, and unlikely hero. Young people likely haven't heard of him at all. So this is a great introduction. The prologue starts at the climax. The first chapter takes us back to his childhood days where we learn that he is a thoughtful, sensitive, intelligent dreamer. This one is very family-focused for the conspiracy to kill Hitler involved many of his family. Year by year, readers learn the how and the why. Notably, readers learn of many opportunities that would have kept him safe and out of the war and the dangers and risks of being in Nazi Germany. Bonhoeffer rejected the easy way out believing that no action was still an action. In other words, failure to rebel and speak out against Hitler was to support him. Silence and escape were unthinkable.

My thoughts: I knew of him as a Christian writer and thinker. I have read The Cost of Discipleship. I knew he died during the war at a concentration camp, I did not know that he was there not just for preaching and proclaiming against the regime, but was in fact an actual spy and co-conspirator. So I learned something!

This one was a quick read.

© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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10. Movie Month, day 14

So Kailana (The Written Word) and I really LOVED participating in Jenni Elyse's 30 Days of Books.  We thought it would be fun to do a movie-theme list of questions! 

 Today's question: A movie that you can't stop quoting....

The movie that I find most quotable is BABE.

The TV SPEcial I find most quotable is GARFIELD'S THANKSGIVING.

  • Pancakes, pancakes the size of Australia, and coffee, yes, Jon, coffee. We wouldn't be the great nation we are without coffee. So do your patriotic duty, Jon Arbuckle, and fix - me - breakfast!
  • Woe is me, I've been put on a diet and I'm gonna die.
  • Gee, I've been on this diet only ten minutes and I can tell I've already lost something... my sense of humor.
  • I'm free, I'm free, I can eat! Oh, joy! Oh, rapture! Oh, no! 
  • Grandma: Have cooking utensils, will travel.
    Go, Grandma, go. Deep fat fry, deep fat fry, music to my ears. 
  • Skip the piece of resistance, just gimme a piece of pie!

© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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11. Falling Over Sideways

Falling Over Sideways. Jordan Sonnenblick. 2016. Scholastic. 272 pages. [Source: Library]

First sentence: I'm waiting in the wings, watching all of the fathers dancing onstage.

Premise/plot: Falling Over Sideways chronicles Claire's eighth grade year in a way that only Jordan Sonnenblick can. Claire is upset that a) her friends got promoted to the next dance class level, and she didn't; b) most of her teachers previously taught her older, oh-so-perfect brother, Matthew; c) her home room and most of her classes have more bullies than friends; d) her father has had a major stroke and has lost the ability to talk, write, read. Mid-September family life gets way complicated. All of the complexities of life make for a great coming of age story.

My thoughts: Sonnenblick is one of the best contemporary writers when it comes to characterization. (The one exception might be the mom in this one. Though that might be a case of me not getting her personality.) Claire's relationships with everyone--from her perfect brother to the former-friend turned enemy (Ryder)--are so well done! (I appreciated the fact that he didn't try to squeeze in a romance. This middle grade read was perfect without rushing ahead.)

I really loved this one. It might pair really well with The Seventh Wish. Both heroines are into dance, focus on friendship, and feature a family in crisis coming together.

© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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12. Board Book: Bum, Bum

Board Book: Bum, Bum. Taro Miura. 2016. Candlewick. 24 pages. [Source: Review copy]

First sentence: Duck's fluffy...bum bum. Pig's round....bum bum. Elephant's big...bum bum.

Premise/plot: I will be the first to admit that this one is a little lacking in plot. (Not every board book has a plot. Many don't, in fact. So it's not an automatic fail.) It is super-predictable as well. Little ones see a LOT of bums. Mostly animal bums. But also a toddler bum bum there at the end--both diapered and un. If you have a little one that giggles gleefully about bums and buttoms, then, this one may be worth sharing.

My thoughts: It was okay. To be honest, it takes more than the sight of a bum to make me giggle. I am not the target audience for this!!! I think this may be a more subjective book!

Text: 3 out of 5
Illustrations: 3 out of 5
Total: 6 out of 10


© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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13. Movie Month, day 13

So Kailana (The Written Word) and I really LOVED participating in Jenni Elyse's 30 Days of Books.  We thought it would be fun to do a movie-theme list of questions! Feel free to switch "favorite" to "least favorite" if that is more applicable to you!

Today's question: A movie that makes you think about the world differently....

Inside Out comes to mind. Not that I believe that there are five emotions (Joy, Sadness, Fear, Disgust, Anger) living inside my head sitting at a control panel. But still. I was reading Anne of Green Gables at the time I first saw Inside Out. And it made me re-think the breaking-the-slate scene.

The Drop Box is a very good movie. It it a foreign film with subtitles. And you do have to be willing to follow it closely. But this one is very compelling! 

Big Hero 6 is another great movie. I really wish I had my own Baymax.



© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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14. Speaking American

Speaking American: How Y'all, Youse, and You Guys Talk: A Visual Guide. Josh Katz. 2016. Hougton Mifflin Harcourt. 224 pages. [Source: Library]

First sentence: Drawing on work from the Dictionary of American Regional English, the Harvard Dialect Survey, and suggestions from friends and family, in the fall of 2013, I set out to develop an online survey to gather date on how Americans talk. The maps that follow are a product of that survey--which collected more than 350,000 unique responses. Enjoy.

Premise/plot: This one is a VISUAL GUIDE to "American" English. Expect maps, maps, and more maps. It is divided into five sections: "How We Live," "What We Eat," "How We Sound," "Where We Go," and "Things We See." Sprinkled throughout the book, there are special profiles for different cities and states. Unfortunately, none of them focus on Texas.

There is plenty of information in this one though. It has plenty of 'did you know' facts to delight skimmers and readers.

For example, 28% of the U.S. says "Y'all;" 10% say "You all;" 10% say "You;" 50% say "You guys;" and less than 1% say "Yins." (30% of people in Pittsburgh would say YINS).

For example, 17% say "Coke," 59% say "Soda," 18% say "Pop," 6% say "Soft drink."

My thoughts: This one was interesting--intriguing--for the most part. It was a very fast read. But I'm not sure how thorough and complete it is. I think it is still missing some gems. This one doesn't really focus on unique phrases and how locals talk in different regions. It's more comparing/contrasting. Like TRASH CAN OR GARBAGE CAN, SNEAKERS OR TENNIS SHOES.

© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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15. The Crown (My Thoughts)

I watched all TEN episodes of THE CROWN this week. The show is gush-worthy and giddy-making. This Netflix-Original miniseries focuses on the early years of Queen Elizabeth II's reign.

Technically, the first two episodes she is merely Princess Elizabeth. The episode that covers the most time is episode one. That episode begins in 1947 and ends in 1951! Viewers get the chance to see Elizabeth and Philip marry and start a family.

Also viewers get a chance to see the relationship between father and daughter. (Or perhaps I should say DAUGHTERS). Princess Margaret is very much a presence on the show, a bit of a scene-stealer at times.

So I LOVED, LOVED, LOVED it. It does say 'mature audience' and that typically means a few minutes of every episode are not quite family-friendly. I haven't seen anything so 'horrid' or 'shocking' that would make me stop watching--as a Christian with slightly stricter guidelines in place.

The opening credits are by HANS ZIMMER. The music is by Rupert Gregson-Williams.

Queen Elizabeth is played by Claire Foy. (Look, it's LITTLE DORRIT!)
Prince Philip is played by Matt Smith.
The Queen Mother (Queen Elizabeth) is played by Victoria Hamilton (I know her best from Lark Rise to Candleford)
Peter Townsend is played by Ben Miles (I've about decided he makes every show better.)
Princess Margaret is played by Vanessa Kirby. (This first season has a lot of DRAMA).
King George VI is played by Jared Harris. (His brother, THE DUKE OF WINDSOR, is played by Alex Jennings.)
Winston Churchill is played by John Lithgow. (And oh how well he does in the role!!!!)

EVERYTHING is done so well. It doesn't have a mini-series feel to it. It feels MAJOR MOVIE.  

© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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16. Movie Month, day 12

So Kailana (The Written Word) and I really LOVED participating in Jenni Elyse's 30 Days of Books.  We thought it would be fun to do a movie-theme list of questions! Feel free to switch "favorite" to "least favorite" if that is more applicable to you!

Today's question: If you could change one thing about any movie, it would be....

Unbroken is a movie that I really enjoyed. What I found frustrating about the ending was that the book had a very strong, very powerful, very emotional ENDING where you learn about his coming to faith in Christ, and how he lived the rest of his life. His testimony was so good, so very, very good. That for a bio-pic to completely ignore the most important part of his life was just really disappointing. Not surprising. But disappointing.



© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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17. Anne of Ingleside

Anne of Ingleside. L.M. Montgomery. 1939. 274 pages. [Source: Bought]

First sentence: “How white the moonlight is tonight!” said Anne Blythe to herself, as she went up the walk of the Wright garden to Diana Wright’s front door, where little cherry-blossom petals were coming down on the salty, breeze-stirred air. She paused for a moment to look about her on hills and woods she had loved in olden days and still loved. Dear Avonlea! Glen St. Mary was home to her now and had been home for many years but Avonlea had something that Glen St. Mary could never have. Ghosts of herself met her at every turn . . . the fields she had roamed in welcomed her . . . unfading echoes of the old sweet life were all about her . . . every spot she looked upon had some lovely memory. There were haunted gardens here and there where bloomed all the roses of yesteryear. Anne always loved to come home to Avonlea even when, as now, the reason for her visit had been a sad one. She and Gilbert had come up for the funeral of his father and Anne had stayed for a week.

Premise/plot: Anne and Gilbert have been married over a decade when the book begins. Anne is a mother now, and these are her children: Jem, Walter, Nan and Di, Shirley, and Rilla. (Technically, Rilla is still in womb when the novel opens!) This one has a LOT of narrators. Readers alternate spending time with Anne, Jem, Walter, Nan, Di, and Rilla. (I honestly can't remember if there are any Shirley chapters or not! If there are Shirley chapters, I can't remember one adventure he ever had! I know he's Susan's BABY. But little else!)

My thoughts: I liked this one. I didn't love, love, love it. I'd never consider skipping it in my rereading. It's just not as dear to me as some of the others in the series!

Favorite quotes:
“Do you know that it costs six hundred dollars a year to feed an elephant?” said Gilbert solemnly. “An imaginary elephant doesn’t cost anything,” explained Jem patiently. Anne laughed. “We never need to be economical in our imaginations, thank heaven.”
“A hand-me-down cap is bound to fit somebody’s head but it doesn’t follow that it was made for him.” 

© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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18. Movie Month, day 11

So Kailana (The Written Word) and I really LOVED participating in Jenni Elyse's 30 Days of Books.  We thought it would be fun to do a movie-theme list of questions! Feel free to switch "favorite" to "least favorite" if that is more applicable to you!

Today's question: A movie ending you HATE...

This one is tricky. I didn't HATE the ending of Interstellar so much as I found it weird, frustrating, slightly unsatisfying.




© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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19. Movie Month, day 8

So Kailana (The Written Word) and I really LOVED participating in Jenni Elyse's 30 Days of Books.  We thought it would be fun to do a movie-theme list of questions! 

Today's question: Favorite opening sequence or opening credits....

I'm going to have to make a list. Maybe even a long list!!!

5) Never Been Kissed
4) Enchanted
3) Inside Out
2) 13 Going On 30
1) Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

I'd love to know how you'd answer this question!



I really love this song!!!!

© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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20. Half Magic

Half Magic. Edward Eager. 1954/2016. HMH. 224 pages. [Source: Review copy]

First sentence: It began one day in summer about thirty years ago, and it happened to four children.

Premise/plot: Edward Eager loved, loved, loved reading E. Nesbit, and was inspired to write magical tales of his own. This is the first book he wrote, I believe. It stars Jane, Mark, Katharine, and Martha. One day Jane accidentally discovers a 'nickel' with magical properties. It grants half-wishes. So if you want a whole wish, you have to word it cleverly or else you'll be mightily disappointed! Of course, the children learn this the hard way! And it's not the only thing they learn either.

My thoughts: I love, love, love, love this one. It is so fun and charming and just like Nesbit--in a good way! It had me from hello.

"The library was two miles away, and walking there with a lot of heavy, already-read books was dull, but coming home was splendid--walking slowly, stopping from time to time on different strange steps, dipping into the different books." (4)

© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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21. We Found A Hat

We Found A Hat. Jon Klassen. 2016. Candlewick. 56 pages. [Source: Review copy]

First sentence: We found a hat. We found it together. But there is only one hat. And there are two of us.

Premise/plot: Jon Klassen is very, very, very, very, very popular. But he has a very, very, very, very, very odd sense of humor. This is the third 'hat' book. (Three picture books with 'hat' in the title. But different characters, different hats, as far as I can recall.) This picture book is about what happens when two very good friends want the same hat.

My thoughts: Well, I'll be honest. I read it three or four times through and the confusion hasn't left me. I could pretend that I "get" this book. I could join in with those saying that it's oh-so-wonderful and one of the best books ever. I could use the excuse that I don't want to spoil the book for anyone else by talking about it. Or the excuse that it was so good it left me speechless. But I won't. I don't think that you should have to read a picture book a dozen times to "get" the brilliance of the 'twist' ending. The other two books were odd but understandable. This one? Not so much.

Text: 3 out of 5
Illustrations: 3 out of 5
Total: 6 out of 10


© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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22. Movie Month, day 9

So Kailana (The Written Word) and I really LOVED participating in Jenni Elyse's 30 Days of Books.  We thought it would be fun to do a movie-theme list of questions!

Today's question:  Favorite "hidden" sequence after the credits...

I'm going to go with Mamma Mia for my top answer. I really love the SINGING. It practically guarantees that I'll watch the movie back-to-back. (Or at least go back and revisit my favorite scenes, which let's be honest, is most of the movie.)

I also love Thor: The Dark World. The second one--which has Thor coming to visit Jane.

I'd love to know how you'd answer this one!

© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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23. Nanette's Baguette

Nanette's Baguette. Mo Willems. 2016. Disney-Hyperion. 40 pages. [Source: Library]

First sentence: Nanette! Today is a day Nanette won't soon forget. Today, in the kitchenette, Mom tells Nanette, that Nanette gets to get the baguette!

Premise/plot: Set in a French village, Nanette's Baguette stars a couple of frogs. Nanette is being trusted with a great responsibility: going to the bakery to get a baguette all by herself. Can she handle it? Maybe. Maybe not. But what really sets this one apart is the excessive rhyming. Willems' teases readers with how many words and phrases he can work into the story that rhymes with baguette. The odd thing is, that most of them are woven into the story in a way that works. (I don't think all of them do).

My thoughts: I'm trying to be objective here. If it wasn't written by Mo Willems, what would I honestly think of this one?! I think I would probably like but maybe not love it. I think I would appreciate the fun rhyming. (I do love a good rhyming book with great flow!) But I don't think I'd necessarily be gushing that this is the best book the world has ever seen.

That being said. NEW MO WILLEMS. If I wasn't gluten-sensitive, I could totally relate to Nanette and her Mom giving into temptation and EATING the baguettes before they got home.

Text: 4 out of 5
Illustrations: 3 out of 5
Total: 7 out of 10


© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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24. Movie Month, day 10

So Kailana (The Written Word) and I really LOVED participating in Jenni Elyse's 30 Days of Books.  We thought it would be fun to do a movie-theme list of questions!

Today's question: A movie ending you LOVE...

Time for a list!

5) Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
4) Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies
3) Never Been Kissed
2) Enchanted
1) Ever After

© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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25. March: Book Two

March Book Two. John Lewis. Andrew Aydin. Illustrated by Nate Powell. 2015. 189 pages. [Source: Library]

First sentence: January 20, 2009. Brother John--Good to see you. You ready?

Premise/plot: March is the graphic novel autobiography of John Lewis. So far, there are three volumes in this autobiography. Today, I am reviewing book two. Lewis gives us an incredible behind-the-scenes glimpse of the civil rights movement. This one also has a built-in framework: it is set in 2009, and he's reflecting on his life before attending the Inauguration.

My thoughts: I can't imagine anyone reading the first book and not wanting to continue on with book two. My guess? They'd want it IMMEDIATELY. This second book picks up the story of the civil rights movement in November 1960. (The 'present' day story is still January 2009). This second volume is even better, in my opinion. It covers almost four years: the rest of 1960, 1961, 1962, and 1963. OH THE INTENSITY. I don't know how it is both possible to stay big-picture and yet include so many details, but, the writing is so wonderful, the art is so wonderful, that it just really puts you right there and keeps you engaged.

Definitely would recommend book one and two. I'm excited to start book three soon!


© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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