What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Comments

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
<<August 2015>>
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
      01
02030405060708
09101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     
new posts in all blogs
Viewing Blog: Illustration Friday Blog, Most Recent at Top
Results 1 - 25 of 1,638
Visit This Blog | Login to Add to MyJacketFlap
Blog Banner
Statistics for Illustration Friday Blog

Number of Readers that added this blog to their MyJacketFlap: 16
1. Illustrator Submission :: Nick Bear

Post by Chloe

11825688_1685541338346858_8657043361223744994_n

tumblr_nqquz7Vd281qko8s7o1_1280

11703124_1682308528670139_6580394297467086592_n

tumblr_nmmql1Vfmt1qko8s7o1_1280

Nick Bear is a professional artist with a passion for illustration. His style is bold, colourful and often full of character and humour. This has made him popular among game production companies and his illustrations have featured in some of the world’s most popular games such as Plants vs Zombies 2 and Bejeweled Blitz. If you would like to see more of Nick Bear’s graphic illustrations, please visit his portfolio.

0 Comments on Illustrator Submission :: Nick Bear as of 8/2/2015 10:39:00 AM
Add a Comment
2. GROW by Marijke Buurlage

growgrow

Submitted by Marijke Buurlage for the Illustration Friday topic GROW.

0 Comments on GROW by Marijke Buurlage as of 8/1/2015 11:03:00 AM
Add a Comment
3. Part time job, full-time artist: rethinking the creative career trajectory

Amy Ng blogs at Pikaland, a popular stop for illustration lovers, students and artists who are looking for answers on how to find a balance between art, creativity and commerce.

Two years ago while I was attending a conference on children’s books in Singapore, I sat in on a panel that consisted of two writers and an illustrator. The one-hour long talk was about their journey and experience, and how they got to where they were, career-wise. When the Q+A session rolled about, I knew what I wanted to ask – it was at the back of my mind when I saw the slides of their journey and creative processes. It slid off my tongue: “How do you guys earn enough to do this for a living, since you only produce about 2 books a year?” 

The room buzzed a little, and murmurs could be heard. It turns out it might be a little sensitive – this topic about money. But I had asked in earnest, because their achievements were not to be scoffed at. However, it didn’t add up, because we all know how long it takes a book to get published. And was there a secret to holding out for a paycheque to cash out in the meantime? It wasn’t meant to put anyone down – I was just really, really curious.

Their answer? Both of them had part-time jobs unrelated to writing/illustrating. They were frank: they couldn’t possibly live off from their books (not at the moment anyway). They told the crowd that having a part-time job freed them of the pressures of having to rely on their books financially – which would ruin their experience of writing/illustrating one. 

It made a lot of sense. And I was thrilled that they didn’t sugarcoat the experience. They told the practical side of a story that not many people care to hear about. Maybe it ruins the perfect illusion – one that spreads the idea that artists are supposed to come out the other end, triumphant after years of struggling alone, working hard on their craft. Although some might find it a silly or even inappropriate question to ask (It’s too personal! No one wants to hear the negative stuff!), I felt it was important. And it’s a pity no one talks about it more within the creative field. 

Beyond the encouraging (and yet irritating) shouts of “Work harder!”, “You’re not doing enough!” and “You need to get out there more!” that’s ringing in the ears of every artists who has tried, failed and tried again, harder; it can mean so much. It means that the idea of an artist, sitting behind their desk, deep in the flow of creating work with no other obligations (financial or otherwise) besides their 100% focus on their art, might be a reality that’s not in line with what a lot of artists are facing. 

Yes, there is a percentage of artists who are able to do it full time, but they add a whole lot of other things to their repertoire too – some teach, some freelance on the side, and others pick up part-time jobs to substitute their income. Besides art patronage (which is harder to come by these days), there’s another way; one that’s not talked about more:  sponsorship. This article – “Sponsored” by my husband: Why it’s a problem that writers never talk about where their money comes from – is a really great article about how artists are doing a disservice to others by not being honest about how they got to where they are. Replace “writer” with “artist” in the article and there’s not much difference – we’ve all gotten help along the way. The question is how much? Was it through your own efforts, or by someone else? No one really talks about where their money comes from (or maybe there’s not enough frank conversations around it to begin with in the first place). 

Some might not need to make money from their art – for some, the love of process is enough. But for many, the financial lift from selling their work isn’t just about making a living. It’s a sign that they’re doing what they love – and are being loved by others as well. Call it validation. Or maybe the fact that it could signal the beginning of a viable business (and no, it’s not a bad word). It’s a value system that rings higher than just dollars and cents.

Taking on another job – part-time or otherwise, doesn’t mean that you’ve hung up your artist hat for good. It just means that you’re being pragmatic and realistic. Money pays the bills and keeps the light on. It keeps your fingers warm enough to move when the temperature outside is freezing. It keeps you from hunger and pain, and it buys you supplies needed for you to work your magic. Above all, having a bit of money ensures that your basic needs are met, so that you can focus on creating great things.

Taking on another job – part-time or otherwise – is also a great way to add another dimension to your work, particularly if you have interests that run outside of art that you can capitalise on. Or perhaps you’re merely taking on extra work to fill the the gaps financially, and are not really into whatever it is you’re doing to help pay the bills. That’s fine too. Whatever works for you. Just remember: if you start to have a strong, adverse reaction to work outside of your creative interests, perhaps it’s time to take a step back and re-evaluate the impact it will have on your art. 

It’s a fine line to tread. You don’t want to be too comfortable that you neglect your art, but you want to earn enough so that you can take the edge off from financial burdens. So what’s the best way to go about it? Pick something that you’re good at. Something that you can do quicker, or better than others. Do something that comes second nature to you (and I’m not talking about lying back on the couch going over Games of Thrones).

I know a few people (myself included) who look for avenues where they can separate their emotions from work. In other words, they are able to distinguish and remove themselves emotionally while completing the task at hand. For example, if you’re a designer during the day, you’ll be using up a lot of creative energy – which makes it a bit harder to squeeze out creative juice for your own personal projects come night-time. The goal is to find that sweet spot between your interests and also what you’re good at – which you might find has no relation to art at all. I’ve known artists who are also accomplished accountants, gardeners and even magazine writers (yours truly).

So throw out the outdated notion of being a starving artist. Keep your hands busy and get out there while you scale your creative heights. Find a job if you have to – so you won’t have to sacrifice your artistic integrity or worry about things like being too hungry to think properly or if you’re struggling to stay afloat under the constant pressure of being evicted from your home. You’ll be able to stay true to your voice and your goals, and enjoy the artistic freedom it offers you.

One caveat though: don’t let the need or want for stability rob you of your passion in the first place. 

It’s a fine line to tread, but that’s a whole different subject altogether.

[Illustration: Jean Jullien]

0 Comments on Part time job, full-time artist: rethinking the creative career trajectory as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
4. Polish Illustrator Nikola Kucharska

skan_2014051909592700 randka 5 okladkaaa michal_bros

Nikola Kucharska Website >>

0 Comments on Polish Illustrator Nikola Kucharska as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
5. Pick of the Week for NATURE and This Week’s Topic

naturegrid72nowm

Happy Illustration Friday, fellow creators!

We’re ready to announce this week’s topic, but first please enjoy the wonderful illustration above by Jessica Roux, our Pick of the Week for last week’s topic of NATURE (you can get a print here). Thanks to everyone who participated with drawings, paintings, sculptures, and more. We love seeing it all!

You can see a gallery of ALL the entries here.

And of course, you can now participate in this week’s topic:

GROW

Here’s how:

Step 1: Illustrate your interpretation of the current week’s topic (always viewable on the homepage).

Step 2: Post your image onto your blog / flickr / facebook, etc.

Step 3: Come back to Illustration Friday and submit your illustration (see big “Submit your illustration” button on the homepage).

Step 4: Your illustration will then be added to the public Gallery where it will be viewable along with everyone else’s from the IF community!

Also be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter and subscribe to our weekly email newsletter to keep up with our exciting community updates!

HAPPY ILLUSTRATING!

0 Comments on Pick of the Week for NATURE and This Week’s Topic as of 7/31/2015 2:31:00 AM
Add a Comment
6. Comics Illustrator of the Week :: Phil Noto

tumblr_nf8w7d4AcQ1qhyhwto1_500BWIDOW2014020-DC11-c8479

tumblr_ndsypzZcPU1qhyhwto1_500

tumblr_nk2tikmd5J1qhyhwto2_500tumblr_nr85xy5ypn1qhyhwto2_1280

noto-gotgphil_noto_candid_032013geekdraw9

black-widow-2014-013-000tumblr_n2djokGes71qhyhwto2_500

prv14263_pg1thor

p2wpgqvbvtrfmw38yixdtumblr_ni6dqf0Q2v1qhyhwto1_500

tumblr_n7s52gqQMa1qhyhwto1_500tumblr_n7qbds45D31qhyhwto1_500

jonah-hex-kknoto-jux-2

hit-girl-notoFreelancers-1-Cover-A-Phil-Noto-Variant-SOLD-OUT-310499096739

3465883-birds+of+prey+by+phil+noto883115

Birds_of_Prey_Vol_1_48noto2

tumblr_mxpc185KWr1qhyhwto2_500BWIDOW2014002-DC11-LR-71fd5

1990652-1_tumblr_lqw5f1hvyp1qhyhwto1_5001413944_xl

3818232-black_widow_09_coverDeadlyClassCvrNoto

X-23_21-674x1024tumblr_nkhlisJf3N1qhyhwto1_500

Quietly, one of the best current super-hero series being published is Nathan Edmondson & Phil Noto’s run on Black Widow. I first noticed Noto’s work on Marvel’s Uncanny X-Force, a few years back. His work brings a nice combination of fine art & design aesthetics to mainstream comic books. One of Noto’s earliest and most frequent collaborators was writing team extraordinaire Justin Gray and Jimmy Palmiotti; starting off with a number of issues on their classic Jonah Hex run in the mid-2000’s, then projects like Superman/Supergirl: Maelstrom and Trigger Girl 6 for Image’s Creator-Owned series.

Phil Noto and writer Gerry Duggan received an Eisner award nomination in 2011 for their original comic series The Infinite Horizon, which tells a post-apocalyptic war story inspired by Homer’s Odyssey.

Phil Noto has worked for Disney Animation, as well as a concept artist for video games, including the mega-hit BioShock. Noto continues to be one of the most sought after cover artists in comics. He recently created a series of classic magazine inspired covers for Marvel.

You can follow the latest Noto news and see the newest art on his tumblr site here.

For more comics related art, you can follow me on my website comicstavern.com – Andy Yates

0 Comments on Comics Illustrator of the Week :: Phil Noto as of 7/30/2015 4:41:00 PM
Add a Comment
7. FREE Webinar: Creative Playgrounds

webinar-ad-newnewnew

While making notes for Salli’s upcoming class – BUILD A FREELANCE ILLUSTRATION BUSINESS – she realized that one topic was worthy of it’s own session: Creative Playgrounds, which Salli and her brother/business partner Nate Padavick believe can energize your career. What IS a Creative Playground and why are they so important? Join us for the FREE webinar August 10th at 4:00 EST (or watch any time after the live class).

Take it from Albert Einstein “Play is the highest form of research.”

0 Comments on FREE Webinar: Creative Playgrounds as of 7/30/2015 6:51:00 AM
Add a Comment
8. Retro Inspired Illustrations by Jennifer Dionisio

judy-garland-A3-jennifer-dionisio-illustration_670

fruit-dove-jungle-revised-low-res_670 Jennifer-Dionisio-High-res-One-Thing-I-Know-copy-illustration Ann-Francis-Jennifer-Dionisio-2015_670 Tomorrowland-Jennifer-Dionisio-Low-res_670

Jennifero Dionisio Website >>

0 Comments on Retro Inspired Illustrations by Jennifer Dionisio as of 7/30/2015 6:51:00 AM
Add a Comment
9. Charlotte Day

PlantHunters_Hooker

Blackbirds_Charlotte_Day_Illustration_Crop 

 1200_CharlotteDay_1

 A2_crop

 BC_5

Charlotte Day specialises in creating botanical inspired illustrations, she combines an historical interest in botany with the decorative arts. Charlottes work has featured on editorials and on products such as tents and teapots! Her clients include Random House, Penguin, Liberty and Anthropologie to name a few. 

To see more fantastic work from Charlotte Day visit her website 

0 Comments on Charlotte Day as of 7/29/2015 1:33:00 PM
Add a Comment
10. Charming Greeting Card Illustrations by Natalie Adkins

tanem_800

4-baubles_8003-mistletoe_800 2-carcker_800 5-prsent_800

Natalie Adkins Website >>

0 Comments on Charming Greeting Card Illustrations by Natalie Adkins as of 7/29/2015 6:05:00 AM
Add a Comment
11. Editorial Submission :: Victor Medina

Post by Natalie

Victor Medina is a freelance illustrator from Madrid, Spain. His dynamic work includes bright colors, hand lettering and loads of fantastic little details and textures. See more of Victor’s work on his website.

 

0 Comments on Editorial Submission :: Victor Medina as of 7/28/2015 5:34:00 PM
Add a Comment
12. Fun and Loose Illustrations by Clair Rossiter

jean tinguely

buck-pal4 one_461 two_461

Clair Rossiter Website >>

0 Comments on Fun and Loose Illustrations by Clair Rossiter as of 7/28/2015 7:35:00 AM
Add a Comment
13. NATURE by Sebastian Skrobol

falcon

Submitted by Sebastian Skrobol for the Illustration Friday topic NATURE.

0 Comments on NATURE by Sebastian Skrobol as of 7/27/2015 11:40:00 AM
Add a Comment
14. 20 Pieces of Advice from 20 Art Directors

Screen Shot 2015-07-24 at 2.20.26 PM

In preparation for their upcoming online workshop Building a Freelance Illustration Business, Illustrators Salli Swindell and Nate Padavick followed up their article 20 Pieces of Advice from 20 Illustrators by asking art directors for a brief, top-of-mind response to the following question:

“Why would you hire a freelance illustrator a second time?”

Art Directors are a very busy bunch and we thank them all for their time and thoughtfulness.Read on for their insightful responses. Also be sure to check out Salli and Nate’s educational and inspiring online workshop: Building a Freelance Illustration Business here.

 

HANNAH RAHILL

VP Associate Publisher, Ten Speed Press

“I would hire a freelance illustrator for a second time if they over delivered! Skill, flexibility, patience, and collaboration are what I value most.”

 

KATHY MCCONAUGHY

VP Creative Development , American Greetings

“I would hire someone again based on the quality of work and how hard I had to work to get it.”

 

JULIE GOH

Art Director, Going Places, Malaysian Airlines In-Flight Magazine

“I would hire a freelance illustrator for a second time if he/she was someone who is conscientious and delivered his/her work on time. It’s very likely that he/she would have already been producing the kind of work I like as otherwise I would not have hired him/her in the first place.”

 

CECI BUTLER

Art Director, Design House Greetings

“Well I am assuming that I like their style and art or I would of not have hired them the first time. I will hire them again and again if – I find the artist easy to work with – fun, pleasant, open to feedback. They have to be willing to tweak their designs to fit our needs and art direction. I know that many artists are concerned about their look and their brand but we need to ensure that our product will sell and if that means we need to alter the image we need to have artists who are willing to work with us.

If they provided the above and get their work in on time and in a professional format I would hire them again.”

 

LYNNE SHLONSKY

Senior Art Director New Product Concepts, American Greetings

“Awesome delivery of the goal ON TIME.”

 

CAITLIN WILSON

Associate Product Manager, Mary & Martha

“There are 4 things I look for in every freelance illustrator we work with:

~The illustrator’s raw talent
~Their ability to take a design concept and creatively flush it out
~Effective collaboration and communication with director ~Timeliness.”

 

JEREMY BLACK

Managing Partner, Jasper + Black

“We work with design talent globally and two attributes set apart those we work with again: project management and communication:

Project Management: It’s critical that our collaborators understand the importance of managing against deadlines. There is nothing more frustrating or disappointing than receiving questions about the project a day before it is due. We need our collaborators to set aside time to think, develop, revise, and finalize. Decline a project if you don’t have the time, I’ll respect you more for it.

Communication: From confirming the receipt of a creative brief, providing a timeline and budget, to discussing the creative brief in further detail, communication is critical. Know when the phone is better than email to communicate, and vice versa. If you have specific questions or want to provide an update, use bulleted emails … it helps even the poorest of writers to organize their thoughts.”

 

FOREST EVASHEVSKI

Art Director, Wall Street Journal

“I usually hire an illustrator a second time if they are easy to work with and timely.”

 

TOM VITUJ

Senior Director of Creative, Design Design, Inc.

“I would hire an illustrator a second time if:
~Their designs were current and on trend with what I was looking for.
~They were flexible and easy to work with.
~Their art files were very well organized and complete. ~If I needed additional art to complete a product…such as art for a gusset on a paper gift bag or a border on paper tableware, and they were happy to oblige.
~They used our contract and made few or no revisions to it.

 

COLLETTE KULAK

Senior Creative Planner, Hallmark

“My answer would be that they meet or exceed my main goal of the project (assuming it’s a visual one). They deliver what I’m looking for and hopefully more…over and above would guarantee a second time with them.

Note – deadline also plays into it of course, a fast worker is a dream but the end goal is to get the visual I need. ”

 

MARY ANN HALL

Editorial Director, Quarry Books and Rockport Publishers

“When you get the work, and you just say YES. This nails it. This is finished, perfect, thought-out, ready to sail. Or, if you want a little tweaking, they are flexible and happy to accommodate, explore different options, and just keep trying things until everyone feels it’s right. Either scenario leaves me wanting to work with someone again.”

 

PATTY FLAUTO

Color & Design Consultant

“Low maintenance – they need to prove themselves before asking for this, that and the other.”

 

KRISTEN HEWITT

Design Director, Chronicle Books

“The main thing I would consider before hiring a freelancer for a second time, apart from the quality of their work, would be the experience that I had working with them the first time. Was it a good work experience? Were they pleasant to work with? Were they good communicators (i.e., did they ever go M.I.A. for a period of time and/or never email me back—more people than you would think do this!)? Were they (relatively) on time with their deliveries? These are all questions I would ask myself and the answers would factor into my decision to work with a freelance illustrator again.”

 

LORI PEDRICK

Art Director, Yankee Magazine

“My answer would really be related to collaboration. Of course skill and ingenuity is key but one of the most important things for me when working with freelancers is the ability to collaborate and offer resourceful solutions to problem solving and a collaborative spirit knowing that with editorial there is a team-like atmosphere and remembering that they are working for a client and while they are being hired for their aesthetic and style, there needs to be some level of flexibility.
As a side note, I always tell any creative who asks about how to pitch to a client, you really need to know their brand and their following or their brand identity and who their core readership is. I wouldn’t propose your work unless you really know that brand and feel that your work is suitable. That is the best way to get noticed, show the client how your vision fits into their brand.”

 

MADGE BAIRD

Managing Editor, Gibbs Smith

“I would hire an illustrator for the second time because the first time they were able to creatively respond and adapt to art direction for the first project.”

 

ROGER FRANK

Partner/Creative Director, Little Jacket

“If the working partnership was as remarkable as the work product, then I’d gladly hire a freelance illustrator a second time.”

 

ELIZABETH STUMBO

Art Director, Meredith Corporation

“I would gladly hire an illustrator a second time who has proven that they can be flexible and are not only willing, but happy to make changes to their artwork to better align with editorial content and opinion.”

 

DAWN EIDEN

Studio Director, CSS Industries

“I would hire a freelance illustrator the second time around if they met the deadline, provided organized, user friendly files, understood the product and end user and checked in before the assignment was due for feedback.”

 

SALLY FARR

Art Director, Telegraph Media Group

“If I had had a good experience working with an illustrator before, I will use them again. It’s a given that I like their work for the appropriate job. Keeping to deadlines is key, and where clients are involved, it’s even more important, as with those jobs, we have to take into account various other people and deadlines too.”

 

SALLI S. SWINDELL

Co-founder of They Draw & Cook, Studio SSS

“I would hire an illustrator again and again if I could sense a bit of their personality and joy in the art. Otherwise it feels like assembly line imagery. I like to think the artist enjoyed the project.”

Thanks to Salli Swindell and all the Art Directors who shared their thoughts. Be sure to check out Salli and Nate’s upcoming 3-Day online workshop: Building a Freelance Illustration Business.

0 Comments on 20 Pieces of Advice from 20 Art Directors as of 7/27/2015 6:48:00 AM
Add a Comment
15. Freelancers Work Harder

building

Some people balk at the word “freelance”, as if it implies low quality work by lazy people in pajamas. In most cases, they couldn’t be more wrong.

After spending many years building and running my own business, there’s one thing I know for sure:

Freelancers work harder.

As many of my fellow Illustrators can probably attest to, running your own business takes everything you have. The person is the business, and the business is the person. There is no separation between the two.

Every aspect of running a creative business, from accounting to promotion to production to client relations, is the sole responsibility of the lone freelancer, which means that it’s up to the individual to succeed or fail.

This is why many freelance Illustrators either spend long hours toiling away in their studio or throw in the towel and go back to punching time clocks. If you’re the type to stick it out, you probably work harder for more hours than your peers who work for someone else. What’s more, you probably sacrifice more of your personal life and leisure, which is something many people who don’t work for themselves fail to understand.

In fact, I’ll go even further by saying that most freelancers I know work harder than any boss I’ve ever had anywhere. Period.

Pride of Ownership

The benefit of this is that the freelancer owns every success, every milestone, and every moment of pride that comes with running a successful business. On the flip side, of course, they also own every failure, every weakness, and every loss.

This can make for a more stressful life, to be sure, but it also yields the satisfaction of a path less traveled, and a sense of identity that can never be achieved by working for someone else.

Here’s to all the freelancers out there who work their butts off every day.

0 Comments on Freelancers Work Harder as of 7/27/2015 6:48:00 AM
Add a Comment
16. Colorful and Surreal Illustrations by Kelly Airo

imaginary thesun theempress thehermit

Kelly Airo Website >>

0 Comments on Colorful and Surreal Illustrations by Kelly Airo as of 7/25/2015 6:34:00 AM
Add a Comment
17. Why You Don’t Need a Degree to Be an Artist

Amy Ng blogs at Pikaland, a popular stop for illustration lovers, students and artists who are looking for answers on how to find a balance between art, creativity and commerce.

Lim Heng Swee aka ilovedoodle

I like to challenge conventions and ideas alot.

And one of the topics that I can quickly get hot under the collar about is the topic of education. I think it’s a field that needs to be challenged, especially in this day and age where information runs freely and so abundantly. I’m not against the idea of learning. Far from it – I’m challenging the idea that learning needs to be in a formal environment, for a minimum of 2 to 3 years, learning about things that ultimately do not help you get to where you want to be.

You see, I get a lot of questions about pursuing a Masters degree, or even a diploma in a field that they love, i.e. art or illustration. And if you’re a student who knows what you want, and you have the means to go to a college or university, then by all means, go for it. But only IF you want to and feel very strongly about it and know what you want to get out of it. For the rest who don’t know what you want or can’t afford to go to college or university, then this article is for you. For those of you who don’t know whether to continue your education or not, then this is for you too.

I spent 5 years in a public university and graduated as a landscape architect back in 2004. I spent my life following a very predictable arc – primary school, high school, university, and then work. Only I didn’t work in the field that I graduated from. I felt that I didn’t belong, and after 6 months of intense internship where I gave it my best shot, I decided that I wasn’t suited to being a landscape architect. I hated the long hours, and the red tape that governed each project. I hated dealing with contractors and having my design torn to shreds due to shrinking budgets. And I hated AutoCAD with every fibre of my being. So much that I did my technical drawings manually (i.e. completely by hand) during my final semester when everyone else was doing theirs via computer.

So when I graduated, I turned to publishing immediately. What made me go to a publisher with nary a resume and no work history to prove my worth? Instead of focusing on what I didn’t have, I demonstrated what I could do instead. I wrote up an article and laid it out in Adobe Photoshop, to give an idea of the sort of articles I think should appear on the magazine. I got a callback for an interview and was hired on the spot as an editorial assistant. You wouldn’t believe the amount of push back I got from my peers and my parents about going for a job that required skills I didn’t learn in university! People said it would never work, and that no one would hire me – not without a Mass Communication or a journalism degree. I challenged it and proved them wrong. A few years later, I even went on to helm an architecture and design magazine as an editor; and even started a regional design magazine for a publisher. My years of education went full circle back then – my years of studying architecture and design made me very much sought after in the publishing industry.

Was my 5 years spent in university a waste of time? It’s hard to say – and I say this with the utmost affection for the time I was there. I probably might not have met my husband if I wasn’t there (he was a classmate). I’ve met wonderful teachers. But I’ve also found teachers outside the system by my own efforts. Maybe I was just lucky, considering how back then we didn’t have the choices that’s available these days. The internet was still in its infancy, and I was young and didn’t know where to look. So we followed along a very linear path – one that our peers took. And the ones that our seniors followed before that. I do wish however, that I could have cut the time I spent in university in half, although it wasn’t something that I could control. I wished that I had travelled more and explored student exchange options overseas. Maybe that’s it.

On the upside: I’m grateful for learning more about fine arts, design and the experience of working in a studio through my time in university, and for the friends I made along the way. I made sure I was in control of what I wanted to learn – I enrolled in a degree that taught me the basics of design and art, even though deep down I knew that I might not work in the field I studied in. The reasons for doing so was a little complicated – I didn’t have access to a lot of courses in public university, and I didn’t go to a private college because of financial restraints (I didn’t want to get myself or my parents in debt). I made sure that the lessons I learnt, however, can be applied to virtually anything I was interested in life.

And that’s what I want people to know.

That you’re in control of what you do. That you can choose to learn at your own pace and to create your own outcome. That you don’t need a title to define yourself – you’re better off focusing on the things you want to learn, rather than what you will call yourself at the end of a degree. That you’re no longer following a linear path – you have a wide open field at your disposal. And yes, that may be terrifying at times, but it’s also a very exciting time.

I set up the Pikaland blog in 2008 precisely because I didn’t know much about illustration. I wanted to learn more from the artists I saw online. I saw their work, and I devoured their bios and statements; and went looking for patterns in their work so that I could try to get a glimpse of why they chose to create the way they do. It was always about ideas, and not so much about their techniques.

For 7 years (it’s approaching 8 now!) I learnt on my own. I saw thousands of illustrations, read thousands of bios, artists statements and concepts; talked to hundreds of artists and learnt what I could about this unique career – one that has changed so much throughout the years. My personal accomplishments include being an illustrator, art director and educator. And I want to give back to people, and show others that it can be done. I took control of my own education, and I now I teach others how to do the same at a local college, and online as well.

And it’s the best feeling in the world – the thought that I could do whatever I wanted, if I put my heart into it.

I’ve come out the other side – still learning as I go along – and I’m happy to say this: so can you.

[Illustration by Lim Heng Swee of ilovedoodle]

0 Comments on Why You Don’t Need a Degree to Be an Artist as of 7/24/2015 6:52:00 PM
Add a Comment
18. NATURE by Peter Donnelly

4c2427be3de34de322bd0950671151a6

Submitted by Peter Donnelly for the Illustration Friday topic NATURE.

You can even get a nice print of this illustration here!

0 Comments on NATURE by Peter Donnelly as of 7/24/2015 11:56:00 AM
Add a Comment
19. Editorial Submission :: Lindsay Blevins

Post by Natalie

Lindsay Blevins is a Boston, Massachusetts-based illustrator who creates whimsical watercolor paintings inspired by the natural world, playfulness, and comfort. In addition to painting, she has developed a line of greeting cards and sewn fabric creations printed with her designs. She enjoys gardening, collecting vintage kitchenware, and reading children’s picture books. See more of Lindsay’s lovely work on her website.

0 Comments on Editorial Submission :: Lindsay Blevins as of 7/21/2015 7:02:00 AM
Add a Comment
20. Illustrated Film Festival Trailer – The Colour of Money

Screen Shot 2015-07-16 at 11.10.46 AM

Illustration by Pete Reynolds of Follow the Lights
Animation by Alex Dobbin
Voiceover by Kate Miles
Script by Daniela Fetta

0 Comments on Illustrated Film Festival Trailer – The Colour of Money as of 7/21/2015 7:02:00 AM
Add a Comment
21. Illustrator Magoz Shares His Photoshop Workflow

Screen Shot 2015-07-16 at 12.04.50 PM

In a very useful post on his blog, Illustrator Magoz shares his step-by-step process of creating an illustration using Photoshop. It’s always helpful to see how a fellow artist approaches their craft, even when you already have your own methods in place, because you never know what little tricks you might pick up.

Read the post here.

0 Comments on Illustrator Magoz Shares His Photoshop Workflow as of 7/22/2015 5:16:00 AM
Add a Comment
22. TREASURE by Sabine Remy

Schaetze-der-Erde

Submitted by Sabine Remy for the Illustration Friday topic TREASURE.

0 Comments on TREASURE by Sabine Remy as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
23. The Healthy Way to Compare Yourself to Other Artists

Screen Shot 2015-07-16 at 12.19.43 PM

Illustration by Thomas James

It can be dangerous to spend too much time comparing your own Illustration work to that of your fellow artists, but there are times when it can be beneficial to your art and your business.

I’m sure we’ve all found ourselves getting caught in the trap of unhealthy comparisons. It can be easy to find yourself looking at someone’s art and marveling at how much better they are than you, or how much more successful. This only results in feelings of doubt and uncertainty, which can wreak havoc on your creative output. If you find yourself in this situation, maybe it’s time to back off and return to your own voice and think about what is unique about you.

However, it is also a mistake to go too far in the opposite direction and close yourself off from your fellow Illustrators altogether, thereby passing up opportunities for personal, professional, and artistic growth.

Healthy Comparison

There’s no doubt that paying attention to your fellow Illustrators can be a great learning experience when done in moderation. There are so many things you can learn from the ways that other people communicate visual ideas, promote their work, design their website, etc.

Whenever you come across an Illustrator that inspires you, take a moment to think about what it is that’s grabbing your attention.

Have they tackled a topic in a way that you might not have considered?

Do they have a unique skill or technique that you can develop within yourself?

Are they running their business in a way that you can apply to your own situation?

Questions like these can help to turn simple admiration into a more studious approach that can make you a better Illustrator. No matter what level of experience or talent you consider yourself to be at, growth and education should be a regular activity, lest you become stagnant and complacent in your craft.

The important thing is to be mindful of the ways that you can take the things that you learn from other artists and make them your own without simply copying their approach.

Do you consciously study the work and practices of your fellow Illustrators? What are some things that you’ve learned by doing this?

0 Comments on The Healthy Way to Compare Yourself to Other Artists as of 7/23/2015 7:38:00 AM
Add a Comment
24. Comics Illustrator of the Week :: Eva Cabrera

CAP40008thesandman

at_01Daymares_002

ganondorfzelda

11312620_1010857722258609_8437517378325195576_o

at_02at_03

10985916_988237404520641_4404659090394529400_nel-mavi-pic

cabrera-interview-banner

CAP3000411666224_1029902213687493_8181013613721131371_n

10404866_908575889153460_8569256280219087993_n11011680_1004260332918348_5479784382777467729_n

10995377_986685381342510_3393964576969615735_n11753675_1034774989866882_8953398622574267160_n

Lobo_grises

05_EsaVisita02_1408

Eva Cabrera is one of the exciting new talents to come out of Mexico in recent years, along with her Boudika Comics cohort Claudia Aguirre. I stumbled upon their table of comics a few years ago at San Diego Comic-Con. Boudika Comics has a few collaborative books available now, including The House of Dreams, Daymares, and the brand new Mavi.

Eva recently dipped her toe in the big publisher pool with two variant covers for BOOM! Studios’ Adventure Time comic and Bravest Warriors. She has also worked on various other projects like Esa Visita children’s book and No Entren Al 1408 Stephen King tribute anthology.

You can follow Eva Cabrera and see the latest art on her twitter page here.

For more comics related art, you can follow me on my website comicstavern.com – Andy Yates

0 Comments on Comics Illustrator of the Week :: Eva Cabrera as of 7/23/2015 7:42:00 PM
Add a Comment
25. Pick of the Week for TREASURE and This Week’s Topic

Screen Shot 2015-07-23 at 7.15.14 AM

Happy Illustration Friday, fellow creators!

We’re ready to announce this week’s topic, but first please enjoy the wonderful illustration above by Karl James Mountford, our Pick of the Week for last week’s topic of GARDEN. Thanks to everyone who participated with drawings, paintings, sculptures, and more. We love seeing it all!

You can see a gallery of ALL the entries here.

And of course, you can now participate in this week’s topic:

NATURE

Here’s how:

Step 1: Illustrate your interpretation of the current week’s topic (always viewable on the homepage).

Step 2: Post your image onto your blog / flickr / facebook, etc.

Step 3: Come back to Illustration Friday and submit your illustration (see big “Submit your illustration” button on the homepage).

Step 4: Your illustration will then be added to the public Gallery where it will be viewable along with everyone else’s from the IF community!

Also be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter and subscribe to our weekly email newsletter to keep up with our exciting community updates!

HAPPY ILLUSTRATING!

0 Comments on Pick of the Week for TREASURE and This Week’s Topic as of 7/24/2015 2:40:00 AM
Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts