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1. Comics Illustrator of the Week :: Malachi Ward

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Malachi Ward has been building up steam in the small press comics world the last few years. His latest release, Ritual 3: Vile Decay, has been met with critical acclaim, and he continues his strong creative collaboration with writer/artist/friend Matt Sheean on their self-published title, Expansion, and Prophet from Image Comics. His earliest works, Utu & Scout, introduced his distinctive character-driven, surreal, sci-fi stories to readers, and you can find similar themes explored in his paintings, as well.

Malachi Ward was raised in Yucaipa, California, and studied drawing & painting in college. Some of his biggest influences growing up included Calvin and Hobbes, Star Trek: The Next Generation, and Spider-man comics. He currently lives in South Pasadena, CA with his wife Keiko.

Malachi will be attending the San Francisco Zine Fest this coming Labor Day weekend, Small Press Expo in North Bethesda, MD on September 13th & 14th, and Alternative Press Expo in San Francisco on October 4th & 5th. His work with Matt Sheean continues in Prophet Strikefile, hitting comics shops in the next few weeks.

You can order a copy of Ritual 3: Vile Decay at the Alternative Comics website.

You can follow Malachi Ward on his tumblr site here.

For more comics related art, you can follow me on my website comicstavern.com - Andy Yates

The post Comics Illustrator of the Week :: Malachi Ward appeared first on Illustration Friday.

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2. Pretty Flyers: The Art of Ben Foot

Article by Oli Rogers
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Before we begin, a quick disclaimer: you’ve already missed all of these gigs. Sorry about that.

But never mind, you were probably busy anyways, right? However, had you been there in the crowd, it would in all likelihood have been because your eyes eager eyes once alit upon a flyer whose unique style could be described as “mid-Century comic book meets etching inside a disarranged psychonaut’s brain”: a flyer that was the work of illustrator Ben Foot. And today, Illustration Friday is here to save you all the bother of rescuing one of his aesthetically outstanding yet probably somewhat trampled pieces of art from of a post-mosh puddle of beer, because you can admire them all from behind a nice, clean screen of your choice.

Music and illustration are two disciplines that have a rich shared history; they’ve probably been complementing one another in some form or another since the first time someone opened their mouth to sing, thereby unleashing an avalanche of images on the inside of someone else’s skull. Indeed, there’s definitely something synesthetic about Ben’s work, with its behind-the-eyelids glow of candied violets and emeralds – and although there may not be any lyrical reference to moons with whimsical cat faces in the songs they complement, these images certainly hail from the same dimension of inspiration that informs the work of the musically innovative. In fact, this is artwork that at times strays into the sublime realms of true psychedelia, where image breaks down and the pure geometry of the universe, unfettered by mere human perception breaks through, spewing bubbles of energy and shards of celestial light through the rift and into the viewer’s consciousness. Yeah, you heard. At other times though, it’s as wistful and human as the work of Daniel Clowes.

Besides creating musical ephemera par excellence, Ben’s work has also adorned t-shirts from purveyor of illustrated fashions, threadless.com, and appeared in self-penned comics effervescing with his trademark surrealism and wry humour, such as the outstandingly-named Sparkly Sparkly Chew.

If you’d like to see more of Ben’s artwork (and why wouldn’t you?), head over to his website.

The post Pretty Flyers: The Art of Ben Foot appeared first on Illustration Friday.

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3. Editorial Submission :: Renata Owen

Post by James

Editorial Submission :: Renata Owen

Editorial Submission :: Renata Owen

Editorial Submission :: Renata Owen

Editorial Submission :: Renata Owen

Editorial Submission :: Renata Owen

Meet Renata Owen, an illustrator and designer from Surabaya, Indonesia.
Renata uses copious amounts of rich, ornamental detail in her work, which along with an soft, exquisite color palette, results in images that feel dreamy, complex and inviting.

You can see more of Renata’s work on her website.

 

The post Editorial Submission :: Renata Owen appeared first on Illustration Friday.

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4. Flora Waycott Illustration

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Flora Waycott graduated from Winchester School of Art with a BA Hons in Textile Design, her whimsical designs are inspired by her childhood in Japan where she was surrounded by lots of colours and patterns. She currently works freelance in New Zealand creating illustrations and surface patterns for stationary and the children’s apparel market. I really like all the textures that you can see in Flora Waycott’s work as I think this makes them really visually exciting. I also love how she uses nature in her work as it looks very beautiful.

To see more work by this talented illustrator visit her website or facebook. You can also purchase cards and tea-towels from her Etsy shop.

Posted by Jessica Holden.

The post Flora Waycott Illustration appeared first on Illustration Friday.

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5. Contemporary Artist: Louise McNaught

 

Contemporary artist, Louise McNaught uses nature and animals as her primary source for inspiration and says her degree in Fine Art at the University of Greenwich (2012) helped her achieve what she does today. It is so reassuring to hear this as an undergraduate student and budding artist myself!

The use of vibrant colour created by using neon and metallic paints gives a sense of uniqueness and life to her paintings, although even McNaught’s delicate use of pencil brings this sense of depth also. There is something mesmerising about her work and how she portrays nature as a powerful force, emphasing their beauty. I also love the way the artist uses a variety of materials to paint on which gives her pieces a certain edge.

More of McNaught’s work can be viewed on her Facebook page and Website.

 

Thanks for reading,

Carla

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6. Back to school : 5 Creative tips before you start art college or university

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Hey everyone ,

Pretty soon I know a majority of some very talented young people will be setting out to start university or college here in the uk . I remember back to my very first day of art college and university studying my creative degree, I didn’t particularly know how to prepare for my degree and hence this meant I was abit behind in my prep before I started.

So if you’re wanting to pursue a creative career and are ready and raring to start your course but want to prepare here I’ve put together 5 of my own tips to do before you start to help give you a flying start unlike I did!

Art box materials : Art college/university is a great opportunity to really broaden your creative understanding , explore different styles and experiment with materials to really find your own creative niche. So gather together a variety of art materials from oil pastels to watercolour, acrylic paint , ink and collage. Having these materials to hand in a art box or tool box that you use for DIY will make it easy for you to carry to and from college with ease.

Sketchbooks : You may well need a sketchbook for each art project your given, one of my personal favourite makes of sketchbooks whilst in college was the pinkpig sketchbook ( have to say a3 was my favourite). Size wise I would stick to having larger size sketchbooks like a4-a3 giving you plenty of room to draw aswell as making them easier to carry around though your college or university tutors might also specify a different size you need like 12×12 for example

Portfolio : Your portfolio is going to be where you store all your progressive artwork for each project from the start to your finished projects. In art college I had to use an A1 portfolio with a centre binder and plastic display pockets however in university I simply down sized to an a3 portfolio with display pockets the same. Be sure to ask your college or university what type of portfolio you might need before you start so that you can be sure to get what you need in advance.

Computer equipment & software :  Now your university or college will no doubt have a variety of computer equipment , scanners and software available for you to use to edit and progress with your work. However its always handy during those dissertation projects or final deadlines to have some of these things to hand at home aswell.

When I started university I didn’t have anything computer wise at home because I couldn’t quite afford it, but with my student funding I purchased a cheap and cheerful all in one a4 epson printer from amazon that allowed me to both scan , copy and print ( I still have this 4 years on!). Secondly the computer I bought was a hp pavillion laptop but a majority of my friends had the money to invest in mac computers. To be honest its really up to you even if you go for a windows laptop like I did or mac you can still do a majority of the same things that you can on a apple laptop though the great thing about getting a laptop version is they’re much more portable.

If your wanting to try software there are some  trial and student editions of adobe that you can get online or subscribe to creative cloud etc with student discount on top which comes in handy ( though I’ve not tried  CC myself).

Be open minded & try new things: I remember when I started art college I was very much into the “Manga”, at 17 it was what I was aiming to do ( current fad at the time look how my style turned out in the end!) so I drew very graphically in my work using strictly ink and markers and because I did this I missed out on being able to experience more techniques like print making. So one thing to be is open minded , though you may well have an aspiration to be a specific type of artist that may well change as you get older. My best advice is listen to your tutors and experiment in your creative studio as much as you can and absorb all the learning.

Image by designer  Susan Estelle Kwas   you can find out more about their work here.

The post Back to school : 5 Creative tips before you start art college or university appeared first on Illustration Friday.

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7. “Designy Illustrator” Mikey Burton

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Self-described “designy illustrator” Mikey Burton is a Philadelphia-based creative with a serious bear preoccupation. His professional work centers around editorial illustration, infographics, and identity design. He’s also been bestowed with awards from ADC Young Guns, Communication Arts, & Graphis, some of the most prestigious organizations in the industry, and has worked with clients like The Atlantic, Converse, Facebook, Fast Company, and Wilco. Mikey values simplicity in principles of color and design, using minimalism and traditionally-inspired typography to an effective advantage. The understated elegance of his work is what secured his spot in the Art Crush Friday Hall of Fame.

Mikey’s aesthetic is identified in the intersection between sharp, geometric vector designs and substantial, meaningful textures. I use the word meaningful not to be an art school asshole, but to say that the textures have strong purpose and intent in his work.

As I’ve learned more and more about graphic design, I’ve started to see the fork in the road that exists between flat and realistic design (this gorgeous Webby-winning site explains this very conundrum in further detail). As I mentioned earlier, Mikey’s process allows real textures to shine through flat shapes, seemingly creating atmospheres within the simplest of flattened shapes. Interestingly enough, he’s referenced his really old HP LaserJet printer as being the very tool that creates these fascinating textures. [More about his process here.]

Mikey swears by two things in particular before starting his design process: coffee and preliminary sketching. He’s a refreshingly real person who needs to participate in real humany things before dragging along on the computer for hours on end. He will routinely post final work to his Dribbble account, modestly seeking feedback from the peers he so deeply respects. I admire his humility, honesty and continual hustle for meaningful work, even amidst his great successes thus far. For budding designers, here’s some of Mikey’s advice: create work that you want to be hired to do, and don’t be a lame person to deal with.

Follow along with Mikey and his adventures to come:

Website

Dribble

Instagram

Twitter

 

The post “Designy Illustrator” Mikey Burton appeared first on Illustration Friday.

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8. Pick of the Week for JOURNEY and This Week’s Topic

 

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Happy Friday!

We’re excited to announce this week’s topic, but first please enjoy the illustration above by Daniel Guidera, our Pick of the Week for last week’s topic of ‘JOURNEY’. You can also see a gallery of all the other inspiring entries here.

And of course, you can now participate in this week’s topic:

SKULL

Here’s how:

Step 1: Illustrate your interpretation of the current week’s topic (always viewable on the homepage).

Step 2: Post your image onto your blog / flickr / facebook, etc.

Step 3: Come back to Illustration Friday and submit your illustration (see big “Submit your illustration” button on the homepage).

Step 4: Your illustration will then be added to the participant gallery where it will be viewable along with everyone else’s from the IF community!

Also be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter and subscribe to our weekly email newsletter to keep up with our exciting community updates!

HAPPY ILLUSTRATING!

The post Pick of the Week for JOURNEY and This Week’s Topic appeared first on Illustration Friday.

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9. Illustrator: Matt Chamberlain

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Matt Chamberlain is a University student studying contemporary art and illustration in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, England. Since I am on the same course as Matt at University, I must say how amazing it has been to see his work progress over the years! His skills in mark making and detail are truly unique, using fine liners as his primary choice of media. Main influences include Dan Mumford and Paul Jackson which is clear to see from the detail in his work. See more of Chamberlain’s work here and on Etsy.

 

Thanks for reading,

Carla

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10. Comics Illustrator of the Week :: David Lapham

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It was great news when it was announced that Stray Bullets would be returning to comic stands again, with the new series Stray Bullets: Killers. I’ve been a fan of David Lapham’s work since 1995, when a local comics shop owner handed me a copy of Stray Bullets #1, and said, “I know you like different stuff. You should try this.” Well, Stray Bullets was different than your average super-hero/cartoon comic book, that’s for sure. It read like a mixture of Pulp Fiction, and Mean Streets. The series was self-published, and self-marketed for 10 years, with 40 issues produced, which is quite an impressive feat in the volatile comics market. Lapham took a break from Stray Bullets in 2005, and did writing/drawing work for many of the major publishers, including Young Liars for DC/Vertigo, Daredevil vs. Punisher for Marvel, and Crossed for Avatar Press.

It makes perfect sense that he would take the long awaited final issue of Stray Bullets, #41, and the spin off series Killers to Image Comics, since the publisher has now become a safe haven for the type of original, creator owned comics that David Lapham was an early pioneer of.

In addition to Stray Bullets: Killers, Lapham recently completed his first all-ages series, Juice Squeezers, and he’s currently writing the comics adaptation of the hit FX TV series(and series of books) The Strain, both published by Dark Horse Comics.

You can follow David Lapham on Twitter here.

For more comics related art, you can follow me on my website comicstavern.com - Andy Yates

The post Comics Illustrator of the Week :: David Lapham appeared first on Illustration Friday.

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11. Editorial Submission :: Bett Norris

Post by Natalie

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Bett Norris is an illustrator living in the lively city of Bristol, UK. She earned a degree in illustration from the University of the West of England and since then has worked on a variety of projects including editorial work, social media campaigns, exhibitions and most recently an animation for The School of Life. She finds inspiration in packaging, travel posters and classic design. Experimenting with shape, color and line she fuses traditional drawing techniques with digital technology to produce bespoke illustration, pattern design, portraiture and typography.

See more of Bett’s work here.

The post Editorial Submission :: Bett Norris appeared first on Illustration Friday.

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12. Kyle Bean

Posted by Jessica Holden

Kyle Bean

Kyle Bean

Kyle Bean

Kyle Bean

Kyle Bean

Kyle Bean graduated from the University of Brighton in 2009, he was spotted and commissioned by Liberty to create a window display.  He has a passion for crafts and conceptual thinking, using a variety of materials to solve the brief in clever and exciting ways. His clients include; Wallpaper, Selfridges, Google and Vogue to name a few.

To see more look at his website or follow him on twitter.

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13. How to develop your own style?

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Whether you’re an inky illustrator, a passionate painter, daring doodler, pro photographer or more finding that one of a kind style to be known for can sometimes seem a tad tricky to find. No doubt I’m not alone when I say that we can sometimes find ourselves gazing in amazement at the many other creative people in our field and think to ourselves “how am I going to get where they are”.  There may be a creative in particular whom you find yourself admiring both for their style and success acquired because they’re so individual, niche and unique at what they do. So your next head scratching question maybe “how can I develop my own style?” and develop it in a way that is going to make you different to all the other talented creative people in the world, because you yourself are one of a kind and have your own creative imagination to share. Well to answer your question here’s a few points I came up with to think about that may just help you creatively along the way;

  • Know that your style is forever developing and changing along the way

 

  • Your style will have characteristics, textures and a uniqueness of its own so don’t be to concern that it’s nothing like the next guy’s because originality is important

 

  • Discovering your own taste and stick to those tastes this can be anything from techniques to materials or the subject’s you draw, but don’t be afraid to explore beyond that ( don’t get scared to go out of your comfort zone).

 

  • Your style will reflect the kind of work you may want to be commission for, for example do you have a love for the human form, creating portraits of little characters or maybe alternatively you prefer to create sophisticated patterns with lots of colour.

Deep down your style is there you just need to create more to see it and then you can share it with others. Image by designer Lindsay Letters you can find out more about their work here.

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14. Pick of the Week for KING and This Week’s Topic

 

IF King

Happy Friday!

We’re excited to announce this week’s topic, but first please enjoy the illustration above by Manon Gauthier, our Pick of the Week for last week’s topic of ‘KING’. You can also see a gallery of all the other inspiring entries here.

And of course, you can now participate in this week’s topic:

JOURNEY

Here’s how:

Step 1: Illustrate your interpretation of the current week’s topic (always viewable on the homepage).

Step 2: Post your image onto your blog / flickr / facebook, etc.

Step 3: Come back to Illustration Friday and submit your illustration (see big “Submit your illustration” button on the homepage).

Step 4: Your illustration will then be added to the participant gallery where it will be viewable along with everyone else’s from the IF community!

Also be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter and subscribe to our weekly email newsletter to keep up with our exciting community updates!

HAPPY ILLUSTRATING!

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15. Exhibition: ‘Home Sweet Home’ at Atomica Gallery

Article by Oli Rogers

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Our homes are the places in which those many prosaic, private little moments that constitute our lives take place. We cook our beans on toast, walk about in our birthday suits, sprawl on our sofas, kiss our lovers with toothpaste still in our mouths, encounter roving wizards and savagely murder giants in our vegetable patches.

Wait, what? OK, so perhaps not all of these things happen in your abode all that regularly, but if you were, for example, a ghost or a Kafka-esque humanoid fly then you’d presumably still want a little sanctuary in which you could escape the everyday pressures of life, wouldn’t you? And who’s to say what sorts of bizarro business you’d get up to within those four walls? If this is the kind of thing you’ve ever wondered about (and you’re not averse to checking out the odd bit of contemporary art), then Home Sweet Home, the new show at London’s Atomica Gallery, might just be the thing to satisfy your curiosity…

Atomica is a leading light in London’s contemporary art scene, and showcases the work of lowbrow and pop surrealist artists and illustrators. Home Sweet Home is their latest exhibition, a double-headliner featuring the fascinating work of artists Angela Dalinger and Nicholas Stevenson. It promises to offer a bit more than your usual group show, as the pair’s charmingly-rendered slices of unconventional domestic voyeurism have been conceived specifically in reaction to one another. Sometimes subtly, sometimes more overtly, there’s a dialogue going on that demonstrates the cynical sense of humour shared by this pair, and also their take on modern home life. It’s aesthetically charming, and at times conceptually disturbing, but always delightful nonetheless.

Your opportunity to be a nosy neighbour runs from 14 August and runs till 11 September.

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16. Comics Illustrator of the Week :: Amanda Conner

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Artist Amanda Conner has been working in comics since the late 80′s. She’s been in the top tier of mainstream comics creators for a long time now, but with  DC Comics’ recent New 52 reboot, Amanda Conner got the chance to relaunch the new Harley Quinn series, and has in the process solidified herself as one of the greats, while also redefining one of today’s most popular characters.

Conner developed her drawing skills at The Kubert School in Dover, New Jersey, one of the first technical schools for sequential art founded by comics legend Joe Kubert. She met her future husband, and current collaborator on Harley Quinn, writer/inker Jimmy Palmiotti, in the early 90′s when he was an editor at Marvel.. The couple was also responsible for a recent popular run on DC Comics’ Power Girl. Throughout her career, she’s worked with some of comics’ top creators, including Warren Ellis, Peter David, Garth Ennis, and Darwyn Cooke.

Her work has also been featured in The New York Times, MAD Magazine, and Revolver.

You can follow Amanda Conner on Twitter here.

For more comics related art, you can follow me on my website comicstavern.com - Andy Yates

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17. Editorial Submission :: Nip Rogers

Post by James
Editorial Submission :: Nip Rogers

Editorial Submission :: Nip Rogers

Editorial Submission :: Nip Rogers

Editorial Submission :: Nip Rogers

Editorial Submission :: Nip Rogers

Nip Rogers has been an illustrator over 25 years. Growing up in upstate New York, he was influenced by years spent in urban environments during college and later travels to Kenya, Malaysia, and what is now Seychelles.

Nip’s approach to his art is fueled by years of cartoon watching mixed with the training he received from George Washington University where he earned a BA in 1983 and an MFA in 1987. He also credits a dyslexia diagnosis for helping him to “think in pictures”.

You can see more Nip’s work here.

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18. Typographer & Font Designer Drew Melton

Ok, I’ll save you the spiel about how deeply I’ve fallen in love with typography and lettering, as that should be fairly obvious by now. Drew Melton‘s work essentially speaks for itself. His deeply expressive fonts and lettering demonstrate the importance of hand-drawing into the design process. Even in the sharpest, finalized versions of his work, you’ll a spontaneity that’s unmistakably fun and energetic.

Drew is an L.A.-based graphic designer and typographer who’s worked with clients like McCann, Nike, Saatchi & Saatchi, and Penguin Books. He’s had quite the interesting journey to success in the lettering realm, some of which is marked by serious self-reflection and the ability to remain humble.

One of the things that hurled him into the design spotlight was his Phraseology project, started with a few other designers and developers in 2011. Very similar to Erik Marinovich’sFriends of Type blog, Phraseology offers the public a chance to submit any word or phrase to be designed by members of the team. Soon enough, Drew was being commissioned for some big-time typography work by notable clients.

Unfortunately, with that exciting attention also came some consequences. As much as I admire Drew’s hand at lettering, I might be even more enamored with his grace and honesty about his past mistakes.

In January 2013, Drew bravely posted a public apology on his blog to several typographic designers, including Jessica Hische, Jon Contino, Dana Tanamachi, and Darren Booth, for drawing inspiration from their styles in ways that were not entirely “okay.” He spoke openly about his guilt and sadness at realizing that his creative process had been built too closely upon the examples of his heroes, and that his heroes were now upset with him.

The topic of creative originality is probably one of the most sensitive. It’s something that is constantly under debate and argued by strong opinions. I’m a strong believer that nothing is purely unique, especially in this day and age. It’s the nature of craft and evolution to build upon an existing idea. But in an age when visual information is so widely accessible, when an illustrator or designer can essentially educate themselves by opening their web browser–it’s up to the creative to draw the line between inspiration and imitation.

It’s a testament to Drew’s work ethic and passion for the art of typography that he was still able to gain success after this admission. Even while he struggled to define his style in the beginnings of his career, it’s clear that he’s succeeded.

Drew is now focusing on font development in addition to personal design and typography. Some of my favorite fonts of his are LastraHandsome, and Magnifique.

I highly recommend Drew’s interview with the Australian Graphic Supply Company (a previous Art Crush feature), as well as his feature (along with this wife, stylist and co-creative Kelsey Zahn) on Rverie. Follow along with Drew here:

Website Blog Twitter Dribbble

 

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19. Editorial Submission :: Mindy Carpenter

Post by Natalie

Inspire_web  Still-Life-with-Pie_web

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Mindy Carpenter is a painter originally from Victoria, BC and now living in Ashland, Oregon. She worked in the gift and stationery industry for over 15 years and one year ago started her own greeting card company, Carpe Diem Paper, featuring her original paintings. Her happy and nostalgic work includes images from her childhood and objects she has collected over the years including vintage typewriters, trophies, quirky chairs, and funny animals in clothing. She also has a deep connection to the ocean and her paintings are often inspired by nautical subjects and aquatic life. 

See more of Mindy’s work on her website.

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20. Comics Illustrator of the Week :: Andrew Robinson

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After serving his country in Desert Storm, artist Andrew Robinson attended The Savannah College of Art and Design in the early 90′s. He bounced around the south-eastern states for a while before settling on the west coast in sunny Pasadena, CA. His early comics work first appeared in popular anthologies such as Dark Horse Presents, and Negative Burn.

In the late 90′s he created the critically acclaimed independent comic, Dusty Star, and started to get high profile cover work for DC Comics on titles such as Hawkman, and Starman.

He’s had a resurgence in his comics work of late, with a multitude of new cover illustrations in recent years for Marvel, DC, and Dark Horse, just to name a few. In addition to that, he illustrated the fully painted, award winning graphic novel, The Fifth Beatle: The Brian Epstein Story, which is set to be a major motion picture, soon.

To keep up with the latest news, and artwork by Andrew Robinson, you can go to his blog here.

For more comics related art, you can follow me on my website comicstavern.com - Andy Yates

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21. Artist: Sharon Tiernan

 

Being able to return home for part of the summer after another year of University (for me home is Bridlington, East Yorkshire) has enabled me to explore art along the coast of England. Passing by a local art gallery I noticed these wonderful works of art by Sharon Tiernan. Born in Scarborough, it was lovely to see some genuine local talent! The vibrancy of her paintings bring the subjects to life. Tiernan pays attention to detail to create the tones and textures in each piece. Passion is clearly seen in all of her works of art as she tries to make them as realistic as possible, “It is essential for me when acquainting myself with a subject, to aim for accuracy and realism within my work”- Tiernan.

Tiernan studied at the Univeristy of York and gained a Masters in Painting at the University of Hull, therefore it is clear that her skill has been acquired through many years of patience and practice. I took it upon myself to contact the artist directly to gain a better insight into her inspirations and personal background.

Her response can be seen on my personal blog at: http://carlataylorillustration.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/contacting-artist-sharon-tiernan.html

Why not check out the local art scene in your own area? You might be pleasantly surprised at the talent you find, just like I was!

 

 

Thanks for reading,

Carla

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22. Pick of the Week for PEACE and This Week’s Topic

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Happy Friday!

We’re excited to announce this week’s topic, but first please enjoy the illustration above by Jean Tuttle, our Pick of the Week for last week’s topic of ‘PEACE’. You can also see a gallery of all the other inspiring entries here.

And of course, you can now participate in this week’s topic:

KING

Here’s how:

Step 1: Illustrate your interpretation of the current week’s topic (always viewable on the homepage).

Step 2: Post your image onto your blog / flickr / facebook, etc.

Step 3: Come back to Illustration Friday and submit your illustration (see big “Submit your illustration” button on the homepage).

Step 4: Your illustration will then be added to the participant gallery where it will be viewable along with everyone else’s from the IF community!

Also be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter and subscribe to our weekly email newsletter to keep up with our exciting community updates!

HAPPY ILLUSTRATING!

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23. Holly Exley: expressive, saturated watercolour palettes

Post by Heather Ryerson

Holly Exley

Holly Exley

Holly Exley

Holly Exley

Holly Exley

Holly Exley

Holly Exley’s expressive, saturated colour palettes feel realer than life. Her food illustrations beg to be eaten; her watercolour paintings of British wildlife threaten to flit off the page. Since graduating from Middlesex University, Exley has worked with clients Marks & Spencer, Whole Foods, Topshop, Chronicle Books, BBC Wildlife and more. She lives and paints in London.

Visit her website and her blog.

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24. Illustrator Submission :: Katherine Hardy

Post by Chloe

Crystal City  Katherine Hardy Illustration RCA

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Katherine Hardy is a freelance illustrator from the UK who studied at the Royal College of Art. She uses clever colour schemes to create beautiful, whimsical worlds. She is inspired by music and album covers and also sings jazz and blues!

If you’d like to find out more about Katherine Hardy you can read my interview with her here.

You can also visit her portfolio.

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25. Making the most of your sketchbooks

Elizabeth Caldwell

Being creatives we all get lost in the blank pages of our oh so faithful sketchbooks, before putting pen to paper we’re filled with anticipation of the ideas we have within our creative minds that are yet to spill across our page.  As they begin to fill with endless inky pieces of potential and piles of scribbled sketchbooks are formed over time they can often become lost sat within a draw of your studio out of sight. Although sometimes it’s breaking out those old books that can help you creatively in ways you don’t always quite realise. So here are a few reasons to brush the dust off your sketchbooks and reminisce a little in past potential you’ve made.

 

  1. They’re proof of how far you’ve come: Your sketchbooks are filled with your thoughts and scribbles and it’s these that also make them memories of your creative growth.  You might one day find yourself thinking “My illustration/design/painting/photography isn’t quite as detailed or good as these creatives” and sometimes we take for granted just how far we have come on our creative journey.  So look back on your own childhood, high school, college or university sketchbooks and see just how far you’ve come, just how hard you’ve worked and you may even surprise yourself with how talented you really are. In turn this is sure to boost your belief in yourself and blow your little inner critic away.

 

  1. Fruits for new inspiration : If at times you’re feeling lost for ideas or aren’t quite sure where to find your inspiration for a new and exciting project then flipping through the pages of your sketchbook might just help you find it. Sometimes we can forget where we found our fruit for ideas but in that little sketchbook may be a scribbled motif that can help you grow a collection of beautiful patterns, illustration for a book, painting and much more. Recycle your old ideas and make them into something amazing and new because your style and skills are forever growing it’s sure to look different than it did before.

 

  1. Rediscover old techniques:  I remember during college days we were encouraged to experiment as much as we could with a vast array of arty materials and techniques to expand on the potential of what we create. Combining watercolours, print making or markers with ink might have helped you to create a beautifully detailed project or give you a texture or effect you’re looking for. It’s little things like these that may just be the finishing element needed for an upcoming project or simply for you to try something a little different.

 

So it just goes to show how good your sketchbooks can be after all and gives you an even better reason to treasure them and not throw them away. Image by designer illustration  Elizabeth Caldwell you can find out more about her work here .

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