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Viewing Blog: What Fred Read, Most Recent at Top
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I’m in my 5th year as a school librarian and taught about 5 years previous to librarianship. I really enjoy reading young adult literature.
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1. Uglies by Scott Westerfeld

On an initial glance, I probably wouldn’t read this book.  However, after reading the summary I was a bit intrigued.  It’s the sci-fi element that gets me, I guess.  On a basic level, the story is about the value of beauty that we hold, both as a society and individually.  But put that question onto the future, a future where everyone is required to undergo beautification surgery, and I’m there! The book is really more than you might think.  It’s definitely an adventure, as well as a comment on society.  I’m looking forward to reading the sequel, Pretties, in this trilogy.  I recommend it!


Authored by Fred Jahns. Hosted by Edublogs.

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2. Home of the Braves by David Klass

This book has a couple or few stories going on that intertwine as the plot builds.  There’s love, perhaps, both lost and gained.  There’s confrontation on several levels among characters.  One character seeks to buck a school tradition.  The title plays into the “demons” both inner and outer that the characters must face and either overcome their cowardice or succumb to it.  It’s an engaging read, a bit thoughtful.  Not really a fun story, just because there are some real character issues going on.  I would recommend it, though.


Authored by Fred Jahns. Hosted by Edublogs.

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3. Silverfin: A James Bond Adventure by Charlie Higson

I wasn’t quite sure about whether I wanted to read this or not.  I haven’t read a James Bond novel before, but I was a little intrigued and the cover, I thought, made it an inviting read.  Having taking the plunge, thankfully not as some did in the story, I’m glad I read it.  It was, for me, a page-turner and I definitely wanted to finish reading it.  I think there was a good balance of character development and action; I’m not particularly into getting deep into some characters.  It’s the storyline that keeps me engaged, and Silverfin did that.  If you enjoy adventure, this story has it.  I recommend it!


Authored by Fred Jahns. Hosted by Edublogs.

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4. The 2006 Cybils

The Cybils have been announced.  See here to view the list.

I think this is a great addition to recognizing great childrens and YA literature.  There are so many great books, yet the awards are so few.


Authored by Fred Jahns. Hosted by Edublogs.

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5. How to get more readers

“41 ways to kickstart your marketing edublogging efforts”
This article is primarily meant for bloggers looking for adsense dollars but is equally applicable to any blogger wanting to boost their readership and join the conversation.

Excellent advice to start 2007 with.

2 Comments on How to get more readers, last added: 2/9/2007
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6. Exciting things to come in January

So, you may notice a new favicon as of today (the little 16×16 pixel thing next to the http…) Am not sure how well the average browser refreshes these, but it’s a cute little e - and heralds great things to come in January.

There’s going to be a redesign (tres funky) that’ll link together all of the edublogs sites, more themes, features and plugins to enjoy at your leisure and a great big whopping surprise that I hope a lot of you will like. Not telling any more though… just yet ;)

Have a merry Christmas, joyful new year and a good rest… if you can manage to stay off the blogs :) - James

3 Comments on Exciting things to come in January, last added: 2/5/2007
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7. Podcasts now playable & downloadable

Good stuff… now when you link to an .mp3 file you’ll not only get a great onscreen player but you’ll alos have a link allowing readers to simply download the .mp3.

Here’s an example.

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8. Quill Awards 2006

If you didn’t know about them, the Quill Awards are based (somewhat) on reader’s choice. 

Judy Blume at the awards


http://www.thequills.org/2006.html

technorati tags:


Authored by Fred Jahns. Hosted by Edublogs.

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9. Montmorency: thief liar gentleman? by Eleanor Updale

Wow! Whenever I get around to writing my first novel, I hope it’s as good as Ms. Updales’s first one. A simple, yet captivating story of a man’s journey and the change he undergoes in the process. As the title implies we have to question who Montmorency really is at the end of the tale. But, it’s not an easy question to answer.

Set in London, 1875, a setting I thoroughly enjoy experiencing, we are there for the unveiling of the new London sewer system. The story takes us from prison to high society. It’s a fascinating trip; I recommend taking it!


Authored by Fred Jahns. Hosted by Edublogs.

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10. As Simple as Snow

Click here 2:46 PM


Authored by Fred Jahns. Hosted by Edublogs.

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11. Abarat, by Clive Barker

I haven’t really been a Clive Barker fan. I don’t know that I am one now. But, Abarat was a good read. Enough to recommend it.

If anything, the book contains much in imaginative ideas. From the main character’s name, Candy Quackenbush, to the isles of Abarat arranged/named by time of day, I did enjoy the picture the author paints for us. It is, again, that classic story of good versus evil, with the little girl upon whom it all hinges. Well, perhaps that part is not so common. Clive Barker’s original painted illustrations provide a visual interest, as well. If you love fantasy (accessible fantasy) I think this book has what you need.


Authored by Fred Jahns. Hosted by Edublogs.

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12. Gossamer, by Lois Lowry

What a great imagination!  I love thinking about these thing, trying to come up with ways to explain the why or the how.  Here, we’ve got a quite interesting story about the source of our dreams (and the nightmares) and it’s so eloquently done.  Woven in is the story of an angry boy and a woman who tries to connect with him.  A nice, well written story.  The disappintment comes in it’s being so short.  I recommend it.
I have not read much Lowry other than The Giver, which stands as one of my all-time favorites.  I was able to see Lois Lowry speak here in Knoxville at the grand ‘ol Tennessee Theater.  It was nice.  I coudn’t, however, stand in the extremely long line to get her autograph.


Authored by Fred Jahns. Hosted by Edublogs.

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13. The Cybils 2006

Cybils

Join in the Cybils- awards for children’s and young adults given by the bloggers that review them.


Authored by Fred Jahns. Hosted by Edublogs.

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14. Peter and the Starcatchers, by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson

I’m reading this right now, but am currently side-tracked on an adult novel My Dirty Little Book of Stolen Time, by Liz Jensen. I’ll return to Peter soon as I am truly enjoying it. I actually haven’t read Peter Pan, though, but perhaps once I finish this, and it’s sequel (how many are they doing?) I’ll get to it.

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15. Coraline, by Neil Gaiman

Deliciously creepy! (It’s been a while since I read this, but I wanted to add it to my list here for the record.) Coraline’s decision between her real life and the duplicate she discovers becomes a fight for her survival as “creepy” mom and dad want to keep her. I need to reread this. Illustrations by Dave McKean enhance the creepiness.
Neil Gaiman, if you didn’t know, has done the Sandman series of graphic novels. Coraline received many awards.

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16. Gangsta Rap, by Benjamin Zephaniah

Ray, Prem, and Tyrone, expelled from school, find a new, more positive outlet for their behavior in creating rap music. Making connections through an alternative school program and the owner of the local record store, they’re able to form a rap group and cut a demo album that earns them a record deal. Ray’s lyrical skills gain a large fan base, as well as animosity from competing rap groups. The guys discover new challenges as they work to achieve success, and must face difficult choices in overcoming the obstacles.

Written by a British author, this novel, set in London, provides a glimpse into the British version of our old “East Coast- West Coast” rap music rivalry. A good novel for discussion of violence and decision-making. A curse word here and there, but a good choice for the reluctant reader.

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17. Chasing Vermeer, by Blue Balliett

(summer reading) The mystery begins as 3 strangers(?) each receive the same letter asking for help in solving a centuries old crime.  Petra, who loves books, and Calder, who loves his pentominoes, are drawn in to the mystery following the clues to chase down a thief.

I’ll have to admit I may not have been able to completely follow the clues in this story, but nevertheless, I think it’s a good story. I enjoyed reading it, liked the characters, and thought it was an interesting premise for a mystery. Elements of the story provide some mathematical connections, particularly with regards to pentominoes and codes. I would recommend it to all. There is a sequel, The Wright 3, but I don’t know if it’s been published yet.

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18. Stuck in Neutral, by Terry Trueman

I first noticed this book when it appeared at my book fair. I was intrigued by the title and cover art. Seeing also that it was an award winner (a Michael L. Printz Honor Book), I picked it up for a closer look. We tend to suppose that people ... Read the rest of this post

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19. Dunk, by David Lubar

What do a bozo in a dunk tank, the Jersey coast, and a rare, but deadly disease have in common? Do you think humor can both hurt and heal? Experience both sides of humor as you read about Chad's summer at the boardwalk. I think the story is very well-written, ... Read the rest of this post

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20. Maximum Ride, by James Patterson

Six kids, bio-engineered to have wings and to be super-human, escape the lab. On the run from the Erasers, they seek the truth and one of their own who was caught and taken back to the lab. What a ride it is! An intriguing story idea, I enjoyed getting ... Read the rest of this post

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