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1. Divergent Paths

via Blog - Alyssa Menold http://ift.tt/2cpGwiG

Super psyched to get to paint these characters for Wyrd's divergent paths event! As the players choose how these guys evolve, I'll paint their updates :D

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2. The Devil gets his brew! (and what a Witches Brew it is!) ...


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3. “Lovers don’t finally meet somewhere. There in each...


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4. Coming into the final stretch on this comission. Maybe...


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5. Busily painting on this private comission. #sketch #watercolor...


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6. This funny idea popped into my head. It may turn into a painting...


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7. Having a helluva good time watching the Rock Collective! #sketch...


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8. This little devil stop by for dinner last night. #Sketch...


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9. Slappy the Squirrel

At the end of August, I began to make regular sketches of a character I’d thought of long ago. Slappy the Squirrel was first conceived of maybe 5 years ago amongst a whirlwind of story ideas I was dreaming up. Recently Slappy popped up again during the SCBWI’s LA conference Illustrators Intensive. After graduating in July, […]

via Studio Bowes Art Blog at http://ift.tt/2c5ghxW

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10. Slappy the Squirrel


via Emergent Ideas Slappy the Squirrel

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11. A closer look at what this little devil is up to! #Sketch...


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12. Making picnics more fun! Happy Labor Day! #sketch...


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13. Diabolical? Maybe. Funny? Most certainly! Muwahahahaha! Happy...


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14. Looking forward to having a diabolically good time this month!...


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15. Slappy’s signature move. No curbs are safe from the...


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16. Slappy gets his stripes! This is one of my favorite things;...


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17. Mort Drucker

via Paperwalker http://ift.tt/2bfjBJn

The National Cartoonists Society has released a 40-minute video profiling legendary cartoonist and illustrator Mort Drucker.

via

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18. Mars Huang (B6 Drawing Man)

via Lines and Colors :: a blog about drawing, painting, illustration, comics, concept art and other visual arts http://ift.tt/2bvUzTX

Mars Huang (B6 Drawing Man), watercolor and ink sketches
Mars Huang is an artist based in Japan (I think — most of the pieces are labeled as scenes from Japan and Taiwan). Though he signs his work “Mars”, his Tumblr blog credits him only as “B6 Drawing man”; it wasn’t until I followed a link to one of his process videos on Vimeo, that I came across his actual name.

His blog is filled with delightfully loose and gestural ink and watercolor sketches of architecture, interior spaces, and, in particular, quirky vehicles like scooters and small cars — often loaded down with luggage.

He excels at reducing complex subjects down to their linear essentials, highlighting them with just enough touches of color to give you a sense of texture and presence.

Be sure to follow the link trough to the larger images on his blog, the small example images I’m posting here don’t give an adequate feeling for the work.

 
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19. Moran's Yellowstone Watercolors

via Paint Watercolor Create http://ift.tt/2aSTaLp

Capturing Nature

moran_grand_canyon_of_yellowstone.jpg
Thomas Moran, Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, watercolor on paper, 1895, Amon Carter Museum of the American Art, Fort Worth, TX

It is interesting to think about ways that art has changed the world. Thomas Moran, along with William Henry Jackson, is an artist who brought attention to the Yellowstone region.  His art ultimately led to the conservation of the land and its dedication as a national park.  For many years tales had been told of the unusual region, but it was the art that convinced congress to act. Yellowstone was set aside as the world's first national park in 1872. It took a few years to establish an organization to oversee the parks (others were created in the following years- Yosemite, Crater Lake, Mount Rainier among others.) This year marks the 100th year anniversary of the national park service. Please enjoy some of Thomas Moran's watercolor sketches of Yellowstone.

Cinnabar Mountain, Yellowstone River (watercolour) - Moran Thomas
Thomas Moran, Cinnabar Mountain, Yellowstone River, watercolor on paper, 1871, Yellowstone National Park

The Great Blue Spring of the Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone, by Thomas Moran/Library of Congress.
Thomas Moran, The Great Blue Spring of the Lower Geyser Basin, Library of Congress Washington, DC

Moran watercolor of Castle Geyser
Thomas Moran, The Castle Geyser in the Upper Geyser Basin, watercolor on paper, 1871, Yellowstone National Park

File:Thomas Moran - Above Tower Falls, Yellowstone.jpg
Thomas Moran, Above Tower Falls, watercolor and gouache on paper, 1871, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC


Thomas Moran, The Yellowstone Range from near Fort Ellis, watercolor on paper, 1871, Yellowstone National Park



Thomas Moran, In the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, watercolor on paper, July 1871, National Park Service

Thomas Moran, The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, watercolor on paper, 1872, Gilcrease Museum, Tulsa, OK

I'll end with a few pictures of mine from a recent Yellowstone visit.  I am looking forward to creating some watercolors inspired by my time at Yellowstone and these photos.
Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone

Hayden Valley

Grand Prismatic Spring


Cistern Spring

Old Faithful

Old Faithful

Castle Geyser

Find more of Moran's work here.
Read part of Moran's journal from his time at Yellowstone.

Do you have a favorite park?

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20. Picked up a new sketchbook and look was inside! #animalpeople...


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21. Cartoon Tips from the 1930s

via Gurney Journey http://ift.tt/2b9D37z

Cartoonist Bill Nolan (1896-1954) helped to create the classic rubber hose style of animation when he worked along with Otto Messmer on the Felix the Cat cartoons. 


In 1936, he wrote a little book called Cartooning Self-Taught, which presents the 1930s style.  The heads, hands, and body shapes are based on circles—or really spheres. The pupils are tall pie-cut ovals.

Men's feet are big and clown-like, with a low instep and a balloon toe. Each type of character should have a distinctive shoe: "A tramp needs tattered footwear; a dude requires shoes with spats; a farmer, boots."

Arms and legs get thicker as they go away from the body. Darks are shaded with parallel curving strokes. Poses are extreme and dynamic. Nolan says, "Comics are much more interesting if they seem to be doing something rather than remaining stationary." 

Characters can be created by using circles of different sizes. I like the angry cook with the elbows forward, the fat tycoon, and the cop swinging his billy club.


The dog, bear, and cat are doing a gait called a rack or pace, where both right legs move in tandem and both left legs move in tandem.

An assortment of animals "are all made from combinations of circles," he says. "There is no end to what you can do if you get firmly fixed in your mind the idea of building comics from the basic circles."

You can see the influence not only on the early Disney animators, but also on illustrators like R. Crumb and Dr. Seuss.

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22. MIKE PLOOG

via Garret's Drawing A Day Blog http://ift.tt/2be1Ve5

MikePloog: MissingPiece




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23. Preston Blair

via Garret's Drawing A Day Blog http://ift.tt/2bdvahd





 Preston Blair’s Animation (Book 1) is the best “how to” book on cartoon animation ever published. When Blair put the book together in 1947, he used the characters he had animated at Disney and MGM to illustrate the various basic principles of animation. Apparently, the rights to use some of the characters were revoked after the book was already in the stores. Publication was halted for a time, and he was forced to redraw most of the MGM characters, replacing them with generic characters of his own design. The revised edition went on to become a classic, and the first edition was forgotten.





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24. Jean-Baptiste Monge

via Garret's Drawing A Day Blog http://ift.tt/2bdvw7C


Jean-Baptiste Monge





 

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25. Albert Dorne

via Garret's Drawing A Day Blog http://ift.tt/2bbeFbq


 
Famous Artists Course, 1954 edition 





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