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1. Broken legs, death threats and fatwas: the trials and tribulations of THE 99 

the 99 fatwa Broken legs, death threats and fatwas: the trials and tribulations of THE 99 
[Reprinted from The National. An Arabic version is located here.
 Broken legs, death threats and fatwas: the trials and tribulations of THE 99 We first met. Naif Al-Mutawa several years ago, and followed the story of The 99 and Teshkeel Comics, as he attempted to offer modern, constructive role models for youth in the Arabic world. At a time when the world seemed to be in a hopeless conflict, Dr. Al-Mutawa's work seemed to be a shining example of the unifying power of comics. However in recent months, he's come under a fatwa, imposed by a Saudi Arabian cleric, as recounted here.  With  his permission, we're reprinting, his current piece on the Fatwa and what he's doing to fight a charge of heresy.]

Many years ago, I was the volleyball counsellor at a summer camp in New England. It was 1990 and I was fit for five minutes. It seems there’s always an injury I can blame my (lack of) fitness on. That summer was no different.

Running into the lake, I slipped. My hands instinctively shielded my face from hitting the lake bottom and my elbows jerked back and got caught in the sand, sending my right shoulder out of its socket. I popped it back in. It was painful. I had to rest for a week before seeing a doctor. And then, on the way to the clinic, I had a terrible car accident that meant I completed my journey to the hospital in an ambulance. I’ve had my share of car accidents. Two of them were not my fault. This was one of those. It involved being shunted by a Mack truck while I was stationary at a traffic light.

At the hospital I was told that my shoulder had popped out again and that the boot of my car had been compressed to within inches of my head. I was lucky.

It was there I met an ambulance chaser, which was a first. I got his card. I got his pitch. I told him there and then not to bother: if the lorry driver who had written off my car had money, I reasoned, he would have had brakes too. I also told him I did not want to live my life by taking something away from someone else. I wanted to create rather than destroy. I did not want to be associated with a bottom feeder.

A few weeks later, a six-year-old boy sneaked up on me while I was brushing my teeth and said: “You don’t have a country … you don’t have a country …” A fellow counsellor who had roughly the same intellect as the young boy was hiding behind a tree. He had put the child up to it. It was surreal.

I called my father in Kuwait and he casually explained to me that Iraq’s invasion was a routine matter that would solve itself in a matter of days. It didn’t. The things fathers say.

Now, many years later, I have spent the summer recovering from another painful injury (giving me another excuse to explain away why I’m still not fit).

Last summer, as I was leaving my children’s summer camp in New England, I missed a step on an outdoor staircase and got my leg caught between a step and a tree root. I went in one direction and my leg in another. I broke my leg so badly my bones came out of my body for a breath of fresh air. My surgeon referred to my fracture as Humpty Dumpty. It took several surgeries and months of physical therapy to start to feel normal again.

While I recovered, another bottom feeder made his way into my life, this time forcefully. A man whose view of reality is narrow and violent, sued me for heresy and went around submitting false accusations to various institutions asking for a fatwa on my work with THE 99, a super-hero cartoon series I created based on the 99 attributes of God.

Sadly, the Grand Mufti of Saudi Arabia and the ministry of Islamic affairs in Kuwait did not do their homework and issued fatwas condemning THE 99 based on false accusations and misstatements provided by this ambulance chaser. This is after THE 99 had been broadcast daily for two years all over the world.

The United Nations, the World Economic Forum, world leaders including president Barack Obama, the emir of Kuwait and many others endorsed my work for bridging cultures and tolerance.

In fact, THE 99 has been approved by the ministries of information in Saudi Arabia and Kuwait and was funded by a Saudi Islamic Investment Bank with its own Sharia board.

This accusation opened up a Pandora’s box and led to an avalanche of extremists each trying to outdo one another. It led to fatwas and more recently death threats from Twitter accounts linked to ISIL and Al Qaeda.

You can imagine the call I had with my parents and my children when the front page of Kuwait’s leading daily newspaper quoted various death threats. Look on the bright side I told my parents. This shows the impact of THE 99.

My son, who is a summer camp counsellor this year, called me in a state of panic. His friends told him I was dead or that I was going to jail. I tried to allay his fears by telling him it was routine. The things fathers say.

But that is not the end of the story. The early 1990s witnessed Disney releasing their smash hit Aladdin. The opening lyrics of the song entitled Arabian Nights were: “Oh I come from a land, from a faraway place, where the caravan camels roam, where they cut off your ear if they don’t like your face, it’s barbaric, but hey, it’s home.”

Having released it on the heels of Desert Storm, Disney thought they could get away with the lyrics. They couldn’t. Protests led to changing the lyrics on the video and DVD versions. I was among the protesters.

Last week I took my children to watch Aladdin the Musical on Broadway. And as I sat in the audience I couldn’t help wonder should those lyrics have been changed? Should I have protested against them? Isn’t someone trying to cut off my head because they don’t like the way I think?

As I write this I am considering going to Kuwait to answer charges of heresy. The ministry of information has turned a number of production companies over to the public prosecutor for violating the audio-visual media law.

May God bless Kuwait and may the forces of darkness not muffle innovation and creativity. And may the ministries start to understand that in the name of protecting our culture they are responsible for killing it by scaring off the content creators and the content investors.

Why would anyone invest in media content if the producers can be sent off to the public prosecutor’s office and potentially serve jail time. Isn’t it just easier to keep dubbing Turkish, Mexican and American dramas?

And if we keep doing that, aren’t we diluting our culture? And if we do, then whose fault is that? Perhaps the ministries were not set up to protect our culture after all.

_______
Naif Al-Mutawa is a Kuwait-born, U.S. educated psychologist who created “THE 99,” a comic book about a group of superheroes based on Islamic archetypes.

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2. Indie Month-to-Month Sales July 2014: Let’s Kill Archie

By Chris Rice

Death of Archie Indie Month to Month Sales July 2014: Lets Kill ArchieA few interesting new entries this month, headed by, of all things, The Death of Archie! That’s joined by Rick Remender’s new book Low, and a pair of new Doctor Who books become Titan’s biggest selling comics yet. Lots of books not charting this month for reasons explained below.

Marvel went a bit bonkers this month, and seem to have released about 25-30 more titles than normal, meaning there are only 126 indie titles charting in the top 300, well down on last month’s 148. Despite that, overall sales were up at 1,766,686, compared to last month’s 1,624,693, so average sales this month are 14,021, a huge increase on last month’s 10,977. 31 titles went up in sales and 72 went down, with the rest made up of new entries and specials.

Image are still at number one with an 8.83% dollar share and a 10.97% market share, IDW at second place with a 5.43% dollar share and 4.67% market share. Dark Horse have a 4.73% dollar share and a 4.03% market share, Dynamite have a 2.59% dollar share and 2.40% market share and Boom! have a 2.32 % dollar share and 2.14% market share.

UK and European sales from Diamond UK are not reported in this chart.

Thanks to icv2.com and Milton Griepp for permission to use these numbers, which are estimates, and can be found here.

12. The Walking Dead (Image)

07/2009: The Walking Dead #63 - 24,001
07/2010: The Walking Dead #75 - 33,079
07/2011: The Walking Dead #87 - 32,126
07/2012: The Walking Dead #100 - 388,038
07/2013: The Walking Dead #112 - 72,975

====

08/2013: The Walking Dead #113 - 70,273 (-3.7%)
09/2013: The Walking Dead #114 - 70,440 (+0.2%)
10/2013: The Walking Dead #115 - 310,584 (329,127)(+340.9%)
10/2013: The Walking Dead Tyreese Special - 40,572
10/2013: The Walking Dead #1 10th Anniversary Ed - 39,780
11/2013: The Walking Dead #116 - 69,913 (-77.5%)
11/2013: The Walking Dead #117 - 68,818 (-1.6%)
12/2013: The Walking Dead #118 - 68,020 (-1.2%)
01/2014: The Walking Dead #119 - 65,151 (-4.2%)
01/2014: The Walking Dead #120 - 65,286 (+0.2%)
02/2014: The Walking Dead #121 - 65,244 (-0.1%)
02/2014: The Walking Dead #122 - 64,810 (-0.6%)
03/2014: The Walking Dead #123 - 64,460 (-0.5%)
03/2014: The Walking Dead #124 - 64,659 (+0.3%)
04/2014: The Walking Dead #125 - 66,761 (+3.3%)
04/2014: The Walking Dead #126 - 67,853 (+1.6%)
05/2014: The Walking Dead #127 - 71,352 (+5.2%)
06/2014: The Walking Dead #128 - 74,326 (+4.2%)
07/2014: The Walking Dead #129 - 72,908 (-1.9%)

A slight drop, but still one of the stronger months for the industry’s premier indie book.

27, 42, 297. Life With Archie(Archie)

07/2014: Life with Archie #36 - 57,054
07/2014: Life with Archie Magazine #36 - 6,653
07/2014: Life with Archie #37 - 48,842

So they killed Archie Andrews. He heroically threw himself in front of a gunman’s bullet to save his friend Kevin Keller, and these sales are what happened. Just to give some perspective, last time this book charted, back in January 2011, it sold 2,802 copies through the direct market. With this and Afterlife with Archie, someone in the editorial or marketing department is obviously on the right track!

30. Saga (Image)

07/2012: Saga #5 - 40,556
07/2013: - 

====

08/2013: Saga #13 - 55,372 (+3.8%)
09/2013: Saga #14 - 55,585 (+0.4%)
10/2013: Saga #15 - 54,816 (-1.4%)
11/2013: Saga #16 - 54,593 (-0.4%)
12/2013: Saga #17 - 53,264 (-2.4%)
01/2014: Saga #18 - 53,139 (-0.4%)
02-04/2014: -
05/2014: Saga #19 - 55,422 (+4.3%)
06/2014: Saga #20 - 56,497 (+1.9%)
07/2014: Saga #21 - 55,893 (-1.1%)

Holding very steady this month. I’m gonna slightly stick my neck out and predict that this book won’t go below 40,000 copies for the whole of its run, regardless of how long it lasts.

32. Outcast (Image)

06/2014: Outcast #1 - 71,788
07/2014: Outcast #2 - 55,126 (-23.2%)

I would say that’s a very healthy drop; if it can keep its sales around the high 40,000s that has to be a huge success.

54. Low (Image)

07/2014: Low #1 - 43,340

That man Rick Remender has another in an incredible string of hits with Image, this time beautifully illustrated by Greg Tocchini. How many books does this guy write now?

59, 67. Doctor Who Ongoing (IDW)

07/2009: Doctor Who #1 - 10,949
07/2010: Doctor Who #13 - 6,636
07/2011: Doctor Who Vol. 2 #7 - 7,356
07/2013: Doctor Who Vol. 3 #11 - 11,425

====

08/2013: Doctor Who Vol. 3 #12 - 10,220 (-10.5%)
09/2013: Doctor Who Vol. 3 #13 - 14,499 (+41.9%)
10/2013: Doctor Who Vol. 3 #14 - 10,826 (-25.3%)
11/2013: Doctor Who Vol. 3 #15 - 10,926 (+0.9%)
12/2013: Doctor Who Vol. 3 #16 - 10,264 (-6.1%)
12/2013: Doctor Who Special 2013 - 10,926 
07/2014: Doctor Who 11th Doctor #1 - 41,068
07/2014: Doctor Who 12th Doctor #1 - 39,707

I happen to know that the 11th Doctor issue has sold out of a 100,000 copy print run and gone to a second print, so these numbers certainly don’t provide the whole picture. I’ve included the previous IDW run for perspective, but will be splitting the two titles into their own listings from next month.

101. Black Science (Image)

11/2013: Black Science #1 - 40,873
12/2013: Black Science #2 - 20,151 (-50.7%)
01/2014: Black Science #3 - 23,965 (-18.9%)
02/2014: Black Science #4 - 25,713 (+7.3%)
03/2014: -
04/2014: Black Science #5 - 25,492 (-0.9%)
04/2014: Black Science #6 - 24,892 (-2.3%)
06/2014: Black Science #7 - 28,147 (+13.1%)

The second arc sees a very healthy increase.

105. Wicked & Divine (Image)

06/2014: Wicked & Divine #1 - 42,948
07/2014: Wicked & Divine #2 - 27,962 (-34.9%)

Not too bad a drop at all, and still a solid hit.

106. Star Wars (Dark Horse)

07/2013: Star Wars #7 - 41,611

====

08/2013: Star Wars #8 - 38,792 (-6.8%)
09/2013: Star Wars #9 - 37,502 (-3.3%)
10/2013: Star Wars #10 - 36,019 (-3.9%)
10/2013: 1-for-1 Star Wars #1 - 16,690 (-3.9%)
11/2013: Star Wars #11 - 34,227 (-5.0%)
12/2013: Star Wars #12 - 33,093 (-3.3%)
01/2014: Star Wars #13 - 31,543 (-4.7%)
02/2014: Star Wars #14 - 30,828 (-2.3%)
03/2014: Star Wars #15 - 29,967 (-2.8%)
04/2014: Star Wars #16 - 29,087 (-2.9%)
05/2014: Star Wars #17 - 28,241 (-2.9%)
06/2014: Star Wars #18 - 27,898 (-1.2%)
07/2014: Star Wars #19 - 27,197 (-2.5%)

Into the last 6 issues.

107, 109. East of West (Image)

07/2013: East of West #4 - 43,228

====

08/2013: East of West #5 - 36,345 (-15.9%)
09/2013: East of West #6 - 33,381 (-8.2%)
10/2013: -
11/2013: East of West #7 - 32,889 (-1.4%)
12/2013: East of West #8 - 31,059 (-5.6%)
01/2014: East of West #9 - 29,885 (-3.8%)
02/2014: -
03/2014: East of West #10 - 28,853 (-3.4%)
04/2014: East of West #11 - 28,090 (-2.6%)
05/2014: East of West #12 - 27,056 (-3.7%)
06/2014: -
07/2014: East of West #13 - 26,531 (-1.9%)
07/2014: East of West #14 - 26,361 (-0.6%)

Pretty solid this month.

111. Supreme Blue Rose (Image)

07/2014: Supreme Blue Rose #1 - 26,100

A good launch for Warren Ellis’ turn to play with Rob Liefield’s toys. This is Ellis at his most conceptual and arch, and he’s ably joined by Tula Lotay, doing some lovely things with layout and colour. No idea what it’s actually about yet.

115. Afterlife with Archie (Archie)

10/2013: Afterlife With Archie #1 - 41,533 (47,195)
11/2013: Afterlife With Archie #2 - 19,188 (-53.8%)
12/2013: -
01/2014: Afterlife With Archie #3 - 24,266 (+26.5%)
02/2014: -
03/2014: Afterlife With Archie #4 - 24,165 (-0.4%)
04/2014: -
05/2014: Afterlife With Archie #5 - 27,071 (+12.0%)
06/2014: -
07/2014: Afterlife With Archie #6 - 25,702 (-5.1%)

Holding up very well, even with a slight dip this month.

124. Trees (Image)

05/2014: Trees #1 - 31,926
06/2014: Trees #2 - 25,515 (-20.1%)
07/2014: Trees #3 - 23,822 (-6.6%)

Ellis’ other indie book starts levelling out at an encouragingly high sales level.

130. Transformers vs GI Joe (IDW)

07/2014: Transformers vs GI Joe #1 - 23,009

That’s a very strong debut, higher sales than either title command on their own. Or indeed, added together.

140. Southern Bastards (Image) 

04/2014: Southern Bastards #1 - 38,029
05/2014: Southern Bastards #2 - 25,811 (-32.1%)
06/2014: -
07/2014: Southern Bastards #3 - 21,313 (-17.4%)

Average third-issue drop, I would imagine sales will settle around the high teens.

141. Spread (Image)

07/2014: Spread #1 - 21,150

Justin Jordan’s new book self-admittedly has similar themes to both Saga and Last of Us, in it’s post-apocalyptic setting and narration by a character who is a baby at the time of the book, but it’s been forming since before both of those stories started, and it’s pretty interesting in its own right.

142. My Little Pony (IDW)

07/2013: My Little Pony #9 - 41,444

====

08/2013: My Little Pony #10 - 24,475 (31,860) (-30.4%)
08/2013: My Little Pony Cover Gallery #1 - 6,859
09/2013: My Little Pony #11 - 32,784 (+33.9%)
10/2013: My Little Pony #12 - 23,686 (31,365) (-27.7%)
10/2013: My Little Pony 2013 Annual - 18,614
11/2013: My Little Pony #13 - 35,653 (+50.5%)
11/2013: My Little Pony Art Gallery - 6,028
12/2013: My Little Pony #14 - 22,990 (30,725)(-35.5%)
01/2014: My Little Pony #15 - 27,461 (+19.4%)
02/2014: My Little Pony #16 - 26,942 (-1.9%)
02/2014: My Little Pony 100 Penny Press #1 - 21,957 (-1.9%)
03/2014: My Little Pony #17 - 26,683 (-0.9%)
04/2014: My Little Pony #18 - 26,091 (-2.2%)
05/2014: My Little Pony #19 - 22,820 (-12.5%)
06/2014: My Little Pony #20 - 20,711 (-9.2%)
07/2014: My Little Pony #21 - 20,871 (+0.8%)
149. My Little Pony Friends Forever (IDW)

01/2014: MLP Friends Forever #1 - 23,370 
02/2014: MLP Friends Forever #2 - 20,676 (-11.5%)
03/2014: MLP Friends Forever #3 - 20,038 (-3.1%)
04/2014: MLP Friends Forever #4 - 20,149 (+0.5%)
05/2014: MLP Friends Forever #5 - 19,312 (-4.2%)
06/2014: MLP Friends Forever #6 - 18,132 (-6.1%)
07/2014: MLP Friends Forever #7 - 19,850 (+9.5%)

Both Pony books see a rise this month, Friends Forever in particular.

153. Lazarus (Image)

05/2013: Lazarus #1 - 48,030
07/2013: Lazarus #2 - 27,143 (31,470)(-43.5%)
08/2013: Lazarus #3 - 24,961 (-8.0%)
10/2013: Lazarus #4 - 23,701 (-5.0%)
12/2013: Lazarus #5 - 22,695(-4.2%)
02/2014: Lazarus #6 - 21,198(-6.6%)
03/2014: Lazarus #7 - 20,150(-4.9%)
04/2014: Lazarus #8 - 19,826(-1.6%)
07/2014: Lazarus #9 - 19,066(-3.8%)

Starting to settle into a gradual downward slide, but still performing well.

157. Buffy TVS (Dark Horse)

07/2013: Buffy TVS Season 9 #23 - 20,768

====

08/2013: Buffy TVS Season 9 #24 - 20,584 (-0.9%)
09/2013: Buffy TVS Season 9 #25 - 20,392 (-0.9%)
03/2014: Buffy TVS Season 10 #1 - 27,851 (+36.6%)
04/2014: Buffy TVS Season 10 #2 - 21,804 (-21.7%)
05/2014: Buffy TVS Season 10 #3 - 20,556 (-5.7%)
06/2014: Buffy TVS Season 10 #4 - 19,365 (-5.8%)
07/2014: Buffy TVS Season 10 #5 - 18,827 (-2.8%)

Standard attrition.

158. Velvet (Image)

10/2013: Velvet #1 - 41,897
12/2013: Velvet #2 - 25,549 (-39.0%)
01/2014: Velvet #3 - 23,177 (-9.3%)
03/2014: Velvet #4 - 21,412 (-7.6%)
05/2014: Velvet #5 - 20,258 (-5.4%)
07/2014: Velvet #6 - 18,775 (-7.3%)

Dropping a little fast, but still healthy.

160. Star Wars Rebel Heist (Dark Horse)

04/2014: Star Wars Rebel Heist #1 - 24,913
05/2014: Star Wars Rebel Heist #2 - 20,387 (-18.2%)
06/2014: Star Wars Rebel Heist #3 - 19,379 (-4.9%)
07/2014: Star Wars Rebel Heist #4 - 18,710 (-3.4%)

The series closes out at a very decent sales-level.

164. Dark Engine (Image)

07/2014: Dark Engine #1 - 17,407

I’ve read the first two issues and enjoyed them, but I honestly couldn’t tell you what this book is about. I would suggest that does not bode well for sales.

169. Nailbiter (Image)

05/2014: Nailbiter #1 - 22,746
06/2014: Nailbiter #2 - 15,193 (-33.2%)
07/2014: Nailbiter #3 - 16,581 (+9.1%)

A nice little increase as word of mouth spreads.

171. Star Wars Darth Maul (Dark Horse)

07/2012: Darth Maul Death Sentence #1 - 18,579

====

05/2014: Darth Maul Son of Dathomir #1 - 17,905
06/2014: Darth Maul Son of Dathomir #2 - 15,829 (-11.6%)
07/2014: Darth Maul Son of Dathomir #3 - 15,994 (+1.0%)

Dead solid.

173. Ragnarok (IDW)

07/2014: Ragnarok #1 - 15,598

Walt Simonson tells a very different tale of the Norse gods than those he used to write in the pages of Marvel’s Mighty Thor.

175. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (IDW)

07/2012: TMNT #12 - 18,789
07/2013: TMNT #24 - 16,484

====

08/2013: TMNT #25 - 17,833 (+8.0%)
09/2013: TMNT #26 - 17,322 (-2.9%)
10/2013: TMNT #27 - 17,042 (-1.6%)
11/2013: TMNT #28 - 17,045 (0%)
12/2013: TMNT #29 - 15,532 (-8.9%)
01/2014: TMNT #30 - 14,979 (-3.6%)
02/2014: TMNT #31 - 14,684 (-2.0%)
03/2014: TMNT #32 - 15,040 (+2.4%)
04/2014: TMNT #33 - 16,736 (+11.3%)
05/2014: TMNT 30th Anniversary Special - 13,391 
06/2014: TMNT #34 - 17,442 (+4.2%)
06/2014: TMNT #35 - 15,174 (-13.0%)
07/2014: TMNT #36 - 15,415 (+1.6%)

Solid.

178. Manifest Destiny (Image)

11/2013: Manifest Destiny #1 - 17,371
12/2013: Manifest Destiny #2 - 12,801 (-26.3%)
01/2014: Manifest Destiny #3 - 12,034 (-6.0%)
02/2014: Manifest Destiny #4 - 13,291 (+10.4%)
03/2014: Manifest Destiny #5 - 14,152 (+6.5%)
04/2014: Manifest Destiny #6 - 14,851 (+4.9%)
06/2014: Manifest Destiny #7 - 21,500 (+44.8%)
07/2014: Manifest Destiny #8 - 15,060 (-29.9%)

Shamefully, I managed to miss this last month, when it shot up for the beginning of the new arc. Now it’s dropped back off again a bit, but it’s still up overall.

179. Big Trouble in Little China (Boom!)

06/2014: Big Trouble In Little China #1 - 24,160
07/2014: Big Trouble In Little China #2 - 14,838 (-38.6%)

Quite a big drop, but still just Boom’s biggest seller…

180. Adventure Time (Boom!)

07/2012: Adventure Time #6 - 26,019
07/2013: Adventure Time #18 - 21,071

====

08/2013: Adventure Time #19 - 19,852 (-5.8%)
09/2013: Adventure Time #20 - 18,822 (-5.2%)
10/2013: Adventure Time #21 - 18,156 (-3.5%)
10/2013: Adventure Time 2013 Spooktacular - 16,920
11/2013: Adventure Time #22 - 16,905 (-6.9%)
12/2013: Adventure Time #23 - 15,635 (-7.5%)
01/2014: Adventure Time #24 - 14,757 (-5.6%)
01/2014: Adventure Time 2014 Special - 13,388 
02/2014: Adventure Time #25 - 14,191 (-3.8%)
03/2014: Adventure Time #26 - 13,839 (-2.5%)
04/2014: Adventure Time #27 - 13,205 (-4.6%)
04/2014: Adventure Time 2014 Annual - 11,573
05/2014: Adventure Time #28 - 12,806 (-3.0%)
06/2014: Adventure Time #29 - 13,785 (+7.6%)
07/2014: Adventure Time #30 - 14,487 (+5.1%)

…closely followed by Adventure Time, which seems to be rebounding a bit in sales, helped by this special Marcelzine issue.

182. Fatale (Image)

07/2013: -

====

08/2013: Fatale #16 - 17,045 (-24.6%)
09/2013: Fatale #17 - 16,571 (-2.7%)
10/2013: -
11/2013: Fatale #18 - 16,154 (-2.5%)
12/2013: -
01/2014: Fatale #19 - 15,725 (-2.7%)
02/2014: Fatale #20 - 13,862 (-11.8%)
03/2014: Fatale #21 - 14,799 (-6.8%)
04/2014: -
05/2014: Fatale #22 - 14,694 (-0.7%)
06/2014: Fatale #23 - 14,407 (-1.9%)
07/2014: Fatale #24 - 14,255 (-1.1%)

The last issue holds steady, with The Fade Out, their new series, starting next month.

184. Groo vs Conan (Dark Horse)

07/2014: Groo vs Conan #1 - 13,942

The long-awaited crossover finally begins, to decent sales.

186. The Manhattan Projects (Image)

07/2012: The Manhattan Projects #5 - 18,398
07/2013: -

====

08/2013: The Manhattan Projects #13 - 17,556 (+2.8%)
09/2013: The Manhattan Projects #14 - 16,881 (-3.8%)
10/2013: The Manhattan Projects #15 - 16,842 (-0.2%)
11/2013: The Manhattan Projects #16 - 16,674 (-0.1%)
12/2013: The Manhattan Projects #17 - 15,646 (-6.0%)
01/2014: -
02/2014: The Manhattan Projects #18 - 15,076 (-3.6%)
03/2014: The Manhattan Projects #19 - 14,813 (-1.7%)
04/2014: The Manhattan Projects #20 - 14,253 (-3.8%)
05/2014: -
06/2014: The Manhattan Projects #21 - 15,126 (+6.1%)
07/2014: The Manhattan Projects #22 - 13,319 (-11.9%)

Slightly ouch. Honestly, while it’s still wildly funny, it’s had a slightly aimless feel these last few issues, as if Hickman isn’t quite sure where to go next

187. Rat Queens (Image)

09/2013: Rat Queens #1 - 21,745
10/2013: Rat Queens #2 - 12,335 (-43.3%)
11/2013: Rat Queens #3 - 11,967 (-3.0%)
12/2014: -
01/2014: Rat Queens #4 - 11,553 (-3.5%)
02/2014: Rat Queens #5 - 11,121 (-3.7%)
03-04/2014: -
05/2014: Rat Queens #6 - 11,476 (+3.2%)
06/2014: Rat Queens #7 - 12,903 (+12.4%)

Rat Queens gets the Image new-arc boost for its second highest sales.

188. Death Vigil (Image)

07/2014: Death Vigil #1 - 12,832

Stjepan Sejic writes and draws this surprisingly fun afterlife romp, and gets relatively decent sales.

189. Star Wars Legacy (Dark Horse)

07/2013: Star Wars Legacy II #5 - 15,854

====

08/2013: Star Wars Legacy II #6 - 15,394 (-2.9%)
09/2013: Star Wars Legacy II #7 - 14,924 (-3.0%)
10/2013: Star Wars Legacy II #8 - 14,576 (-2.3%)
11/2013: Star Wars Legacy II #9 - 13,999 (-4.0%)
11/2013: 1 For $1 Star Wars Legacy #1 - 6,624
12/2013: Star Wars Legacy II #10 - 13,783 (-1.5%)
01/2014: Star Wars Legacy II #11 - 13,398 (-3.0%)
02/2014: Star Wars Legacy II #12 - 13,029 (-2.7%)
03/2014: Star Wars Legacy II #13 - 12,671 (-2.7%)
04/2014: Star Wars Legacy II #14 - 12,523 (-1.2%)
05/2014: Star Wars Legacy II #15 - 12,473 (-0.4%)
06/2014: Star Wars Legacy II #16 - 12,373 (-0.8%)
07/2014: Star Wars Legacy II #17 - 12,544 (+1.4%)

Very solid over these last few issues.

190. Angel & Faith (Dark Horse)

07/2013: Angel & Faith #24 - 13,368

====

08/2013: Angel & Faith #25 - 13,335 (-0.2%)
04/2014: Angel & Faith #1 - 17,820 (+33.6%)
05/2014: Angel & Faith #2 - 14,200 (-20.3%)
06/2014: Angel & Faith #3 - 13,029 (-8.2%)
07/2014: Angel & Faith #4 - 12,468 (-4.3%)

Starting to level out, sales-wise.

191. The Devilers (Dynamite)

07/2014: The Devilers #1 - 12,311

Josh Fialkov riffs on Seven Samurai for his new supernatural book.

193. Spawn (Image)

07/2009: Spawn #193 - 20,293
07/2010: Spawn #198 - 17,985
07/2011: Spawn #209 - 13,964
07/2012: Spawn #221 - 15,801
07/2013: Spawn #233 - 15,701

====

08/2013: Spawn #234 - 15,930 (+0.8%)
09/2013: Spawn #235 - 15,081 (-5.3%)
10/2013: Spawn #236 - 13,368 (-11.4%)
11/2013: Spawn #237 - 14,411 (+7.8%)
12/2013: Spawn #238 - 12,459 (-13.5%)
01/2014: Spawn #239 - 12,369 (-0.7%)
02/2014: Spawn #240 - 11,827 (-4.4%)
03/2014: Spawn #241 - 11,766 (-0.5%)
04/2014: Spawn #242 - 11,827 (+0.5%)
05/2014: Spawn #243 - 11,714 (-1.0%)
06/2014: Spawn #244 - 11,837 (+1.0%)
07/2014: Spawn #245 - 12,090 (+2.1%)

Ticking up as it approaches the 250th issue.

194. Chew (Image)

07/2009: Chew #2 - 6,735
07/2010: Chew #12 - 13,011
07/2011: Chew #19 - 12,510
07/2012: Chew Secret Agent Poyo #1 - 15,982
07/2013: Chew #35 - 12,818

====

08/2013: -
09/2013: Chew #36 - 12,402 (-3.2%)
10/2013: Chew #37 - 12,214 (-1.5%)
12/2013: Chew #38 - 12,068 (-1.2%)
01/2014: Chew #39 - 11,487 (-4.8%)
02/2014: Chew #40 - 11,193 (-2.6%)
04/2014: Chew #41 - 10,835 (-3.2%)
05/2014: Chew/ Revival #1 - 18,259
06/2014: Chew #42 - 10,981 (-1.3%)
07/2014: Chew Warrior Chicken Poyo #1 - 12,075

These Poyo specials really are quite popular, aren’t they?

198, 265. Grimm Fairy Tales (Zenescope)

07/2009: Grimm Fairy Tales #40 - 9,616
07/2010: Grimm Fairy Tales #49 - 9,594
07/2011: Grimm Fairy Tales #61 - 7,777
07/2012: Grimm Fairy Tales #75 - 11,108
07/2013: Grimm Fairy Tales #87 - 7,201

====

08/2013: Grimm Fairy Tales #88 - 6,023 (-16.4%)
09/2013: Grimm Fairy Tales #89 - 7,423 (+23.2%)
10/2013: Grimm Fairy Tales #90 - 6,779 (-8.7%)
11/2013: Grimm Fairy Tales #91 - 6,697 (-1.2%)
12/2013: Grimm Fairy Tales #92 - 6,262 (-6.5%)
01/2014: Grimm Fairy Tales #93 - 6,362 (+1.6%)
02/2014: Grimm Fairy Tales #94 - 6,175 (-2.9%)
03/2014: Grimm Fairy Tales #95 - 6,036 (-2.3%)
04/2014: Grimm Fairy Tales #96 - 5,928 (-2.3%)
05/2014: Grimm Fairy Tales #97 - 6,055 (+2.1%)
05/2014: Grimm Fairy Tales Annual 2014 - 5,089
06/2014: Grimm Fairy Tales #98 - 5,828 (-3.7%)
07/2014: Grimm Fairy Tales #98 - 7,472 (+28.2%)
07/2014: Grimm Fairy Tales #100 - 11,722 (+56.9%)

Double-shipping this month, with the hundredth issue scoring particularly good sales.

200. Cowl (Image)

05/2014: COWL #1 - 20,851
06/2014: COWL #2 - 13,569 (-34.9%)
07/2014: COWL #3 - 11,604 (-14.5%)

A fairly standard third-issue drop.

203. TMNT Turtles in Time (IDW)

06/2014: TMNT Turtles In Time #1 - 13,840
07/2014: TMNT Turtles In Time #2 - 11,334 (-18.1%)
207. Star Trek City o/t Edge of Forever (IDW)

06/2014: City on the Edge of Forever #1 - 12,028
07/2014: City on the Edge of Forever #2 - 11,224 (-6.7%)
208. Armor Hunters (Valiant)

06/2014: Armor Hunters #1 - 16,484
07/2014: Armor Hunters #2 - 11,224 (-31.9%)

Three second-issues in a row, the first two with very reasonable drops, Armor Hunters sadly does not fare so well.

210. Army of Darkness (Dynamite)

10/2013: Ash & The Army of Darkness #1 - 12,620
11/2013: -
12/2013: Ash & The Army of Darkness #2 - 8,223 (-34.8%)
01/2014: Ash & The Army of Darkness #3 - 7,261 (-11.7%)
02/2014: Ash & The Army of Darkness #4 - 6,563 (-9.6%)
03/2014: -
04/2014: Ash & The Army of Darkness #5 - 6,207 (-9.6%)
04/2014: Ash & The Army of Darkness #6 - 5,884 (-5.4%)
05/2014: Ash & The Army of Darkness #7 - 5,690 (-3.3%)
06/2014: Ash & The Army of Darkness #8 - 5,455 (-4.1%)
07/2014: Army of Darkness Ash Gets Hitched #1 - 10,956 (+100.8%)

Looks like they’re going to the mini-series model from here-on. With a debut like this, you can see why.

211. Life After (Oni)

07/2014: Life After #1 - 10,899

Josh Fialkov’s second new book this month, and enormously good fun it is too.

212. X-Files Season 10 (IDW)

07/2013: X-Files Season 10 #2 - 16,729

====

08/2013: X-Files Season 10 #3 - 17,557 (+4.9%)
09/2013: X-Files Season 10 #4 - 16,999 (-3.2%)
10/2013: X-Files Season 10 #5 - 16,819 (-1.1%)
11/2013: X-Files Season 10 #6 - 15,289 (-9.1%)
12/2013: X-Files Season 10 #7 - 14,792 (-3.3%)
01/2014: X-Files Season 10 #8 - 13,981 (-5.5%)
02/2014: X-Files Season 10 #9 - 13,129 (-6.1%)
03/2014: X-Files Season 10 #10 - 12,252 (-6.7%)
04/2014: X-Files Season 10 #11 - 13,210 (+7.8%)
04/2014: X-Files Annual 2014 - 9,504
05/2014: X-Files Season 10 #12 - 11,773 (-10.9%)
06/2014: X-Files Season 10 #13 - 11,497 (-2.3%)
07/2014: X-Files Season 10 #14 - 10,850 (-5.6%)

Sales continue to slip.

213. Rai (Valiant)

04/2014: Rai #1 - 29,137
05/2014: -
06/2014: Rai #2 - 13,448 (-53.8%)
07/2014: Rai #3 - 10,665 (-20.7%)

Rapidly approaching the sales level of the rest of Valiant’s line.

214. Squidder (IDW)

07/2014: Squidder #1 - 10,537

Ben Templesmith returns to the fray with this new Lovecraftian sci-fi book.

215. Adventure Time Banana Guard Academy (Boom!)

07/2014: Banana Guard Academy #1 - 10,402

Do I hear the distant sound of a barrel being scraped?

216. Ten Grand (Image)

07/2013: Ten Grand #3 - 21,858 (-25.5%)

====

08/2013: Ten Grand #4 - 19,017 (-13.0%)
11/2013: Ten Grand #5 - 17,020 (-10.5%)
12/2013: Ten Grand #6 - 15,366 (-9.7%)
02/2014: Ten Grand #7 - 13,201 (-14.1%)
03/2014: Ten Grand #8 - 12,117 (-8.2%)
04/2014: Ten Grand #9 - 11,210 (-7.5%)
07/2014: Ten Grand #10 - 10,354 (-7.6%)

This really doesn’t seem to be slowing down.

218. X-Files Year Zero (IDW)

07/2014: X-Files Year Zero #1 - 10,333

Going back to the forties for the origin of the X-Files department.

219. Legenderry (Dynamite)

12/2013: Legenderry #1 - 27,174
02/2014: Legenderry #2 - 14,570 (-46.4%)
03/2014: Legenderry #3 - 12,218 (-16.1%)
06/2014: Legenderry #4 - 10,865 (-11.1%)
07/2014: Legenderry #5 - 10,317 (-5.0%)

The drops are finally starting to slow up.

221. Chastity (Dynamite)

07/2014: Chastity #1 - 10,208

Another of the old Chaos characters gets her own book.

222. Tomb Raider (Dark Horse)

02/2014: Tomb Raider #1 - 18,486
03/2014: Tomb Raider #2 - 13,636 (-26.2%)
04/2014: Tomb Raider #3 - 12,133 (-11.0%)
05/2014: Tomb Raider #4 - 11,300 (-6.9%)
06/2014: Tomb Raider #5 - 10,536 (-6.8%)
07/2014: Tomb Raider #6 - 10,149 (-3.7%)

Sales starting to stabilize.

223. Star Trek Ongoing (IDW)

07/2013: Star Trek Ongoing #23 - 11,022

====

08/2013: Star Trek Ongoing #24 - 10,886 (-1.2%)
09/2013: Star Trek Ongoing #25 - 11,388 (+4.6%)
10/2013: Star Trek Ongoing #26 - 10,872 (-4.5%)
11/2013: Star Trek Ongoing #27 - 9,985 (-8.2%)
12/2013: Star Trek Annual 2013 - 8,683
12/2013: Star Trek Ongoing #28 - 10,443 (+4.6%)
01/2014: Star Trek Ongoing #29 - 10,127 (-3.0%)
02/2014: Star Trek Ongoing #30 - 9,906 (-2.2%)
03/2014: Star Trek Ongoing #31 - 9,781 (-1.3%)
04/2014: Star Trek Ongoing #32 - 10,801 (+10.4%)
05/2014: Star Trek Ongoing #33 - 9,729 (-9.9%)
06/2014: Star Trek Ongoing #34 - 10,216 (+4.8%)
07/2014: Star Trek Ongoing #35 - 10,089 (-1.2%)

Solid this month.

224. Transformers More TMTE (IDW)

07/2013: More Than Meets Eye #19 - 9,320

====

08/2013: More Than Meets Eye #20 - 9,402 (+0.9%)
09/2013: More Than Meets Eye #21 - 9,258 (-1.5%)
10/2013: More Than Meets Eye #22 - 9,248 (-0.1%)
11/2013: Dark Cybertron #1 - 12,165
11/2013: More Than Meets Eye #23 - 9,579 (+3.6%)
12/2013: More Than Meets Eye #24 - 10,138 (+5.8%)
01/2014: More Than Meets Eye #25 - 9,867 (-2.7%)
02/2014: More Than Meets Eye #26 - 9,663 (-2.1%)
03/2014: More Than Meets Eye #27 - 9,409 (-2.6%)
03/2014: Dark Cybertron Finale - 9,395
04/2014: More Than Meets Eye #28 - 9,667 (+2.7%)
05/2014: More Than Meets Eye #29 - 9,543 (-1.3%)
06/2014: More Than Meets Eye #30 - 9,395 (-1.6%)
07/2014: More Than Meets Eye #31 - 10,063 (+7.1%)

A bit of an increase.

228. Lumberjanes (Boom!)

04/2014: Lumberjanes #1 - 13,129
05/2014: Lumberjanes #2 - 9,904 (-24.6%)
06/2014: Lumberjanes #3 - 9,150 (-7.6%)
07/2014: Lumberjanes #4 - 9,988 (+9.2%)

Sales catch up to word-of-mouth, with a nice increase.

229. Revival (Image)

07/2013: Revival #12 - 13,948

====

08/2013: Revival #13 - 12,549 (-10.0%)
09/2013: Revival #14 - 12,254 (-2.3%)
10/2013: -
11/2013: Revival #15 - 11,468 (-6.4%)
12/2013: Revival #16 - 11,065 (-3.5%)
01/2014: Revival #17 - 10,585 (-4.3%)
02/2014: -
03/2014: Revival #18 - 10,456 (-1.2%)
04/2014: Revival #19 - 10,384 (-0.7%)
05/2014: Revival #20 - 10,341 (-0.4%)
06/2014: Revival #21 - 9,808 (-5.1%)
07/2014: Revival #22 - 9,931 (+1.2%)

Solid.

230. The Goon (Dark Horse)

11/2013: The Goon #44 - 7,894
06/2014: The Goon #45 - 8,848 (+12.1%)
07/2014: The Goon #46 - 9,736 (+10.0%)

The beginning of a new mini-series within the series and sales head upwards.

231. Hack Slash (Image)

07/2014: Hack Slash Son of Samhain #1 - 9,466

The return of Hack-Slash, and these are the second-best sales the book’s ever got, only less than the original #1.

232. Thief of Thieves (Image)

07/2013: Thief of Thieves #15 - 14,013

====

08/2013: Thief of Thieves #16 - 13,182 (-5.9%)
09/2013: -
10/2013: Thief of Thieves #17 - 12,511 (-5.1%)
11/2013: Thief of Thieves #18 - 11,809 (-5.6%)
12/2013: -
01/2014: Thief of Thieves #19 - 11,291 (-4.4%)
02-03/2014: -
04/2014: Thief of Thieves #20 - 9,874 (-12.6%)
05/2014: Thief of Thieves #21 - 9,625 (-2.5%)
07/2014: Thief of Thieves #22 - 9,457 (-1.7%)

Slowly declining.

233. Vampirella (Dynamite)

07/2013: -

====

08/2013: Vampirella #31 - 5,618 (-6.3%)
08/2013: Vampirella #32 - 5,548 (-1.2%)
08/2013: Vampirella #33 - 5,445 (-1.9%)
09/2013: Vampirella #34 - ???? (???)
10/2013: Vampirella #35 - ???? (???)
11/2013: Vampirella #36 - ???? (???)
12/2013: Vampirella #37 - ???? (???)
02/2014: Vampirella #38 - 4,758 (???)
06/2014: New Vampirella #1 - 22,864 (+380.5%)
07/2014: New Vampirella #2 - 9,445 (-58.7%)

A big drop, but still well above the last series.

234. Tuki Save the Humans (Cartoon Books)

07/2014: Tuki Save the Humans #1 - 9,425

If Jeff Smith has a publicist he needs to give them a kick up the arse, ‘cos I didn’t even know this, his new series, was coming out. Judging by these sales, neither did a lot of other people.

235. Satellite Sam (Image)

07/2013: Satellite Sam #1 - 32,452
08/2013: Satellite Sam #2 - 20,752 (-36.1%)
09/2013: Satellite Sam #3 - 16,909 (-18.5%)
10/2013: Satellite Sam #4 - 14,666 (-13.3%)
12/2013: Satellite Sam #5 - 13,060 (-11.0%)
02/2014: Satellite Sam #6 - 10,797 (-17.3%)
03/2014: Satellite Sam #7 - 10,210 (-5.4%)
05/2014: Satellite Sam #8 - 9,997 (-2.1%)
07/2014: Satellite Sam #9 - 9,271 (-7.3%)

After a slight slowdown in the drops last issue, they accelerate again.

236. X-O Manowar (Valiant)

07/2013: X-O Manowar #15 - 13,997

====

08/2013: X-O Manowar #16 - 11,019 (-21.3%)
09/2013: X-O Manowar #17 - 10,859 (-1.5%)
10/2013: X-O Manowar #18 - 11,438 (+5.3%)
11/2013: X-O Manowar #19 - 11,744 (+3.0%)
12/2013: X-O Manowar #20 - 9,941 (-15.4%)
01/2014: X-O Manowar #21 - 9,336 (-6.1%)
02/2014: X-O Manowar #22 - 9,808 (+5.1%)
03/2014: X-O Manowar #23 - 9,394 (-4.2%)
04/2014: X-O Manowar #24 - 8,595 (-8.5%)
05/2014: X-O Manowar #25 - 12,493 (+45.4%)
06/2014: X-O Manowar #26 - 10,083 (-19.3%)
07/2014: X-O Manowar #27 - 9,183 (-8.9%)

Sales dropping back to pre-Armor Hunters level.

237. Conan (Dark Horse)

07/2013: Conan the Barbarian #18 - 12,331

====

08/2013: Conan the Barbarian #19 - 12,105 (-1.8%)
09/2013: Conan the Barbarian #20 - 11,828 (-2.3%)
10/2013: Conan the Barbarian #21 - 11,800 (-0.2%)
11/2013: Conan the Barbarian #22 - 11,384 (-3.5%)
12/2013: Conan the Barbarian #23 - 11,245 (-1.2%)
01/2014: Conan the Barbarian #24 - 10,924 (-2.9%)
02/2014: Conan the Barbarian #25 - 10,736 (-1.7%)
03/2014: -
04/2014: Conan the Avenger #1 - 11,565 (+7.7%)
05/2014: Conan the Avenger #2 - 9,946 (-14.0%)
06/2014: Conan the Avenger #3 - 9,486 (-4.6%)
07/2014: Conan the Avenger #4 - 9,182 (-3.2%)

Maybe starting to find a level.

238. Transformers Windblade (IDW)

04/2014: Transformers Windblade #1 - 9,855
05/2014: Transformers Windblade #2 - 8,980 (-8.9%)
06/2014: Transformers Windblade #3 - 8,920 (-0.7%)
07/2014: Transformers Windblade #4 - 9,130 (+2.3%)

A slight uptick for the last issue.

239. Shutter (Image)

04/2014: Shutter #1 - 18,984 (21,500)
05/2014: Shutter #2 - 12,267 (-35.4%)
06/2014: Shutter #3 - 9,887 (-19.4%)
07/2014: Shutter #4 - 9,107 (-7.9%)

Still a little way until this settles.

240. Red Sonja (Dynamite) 

07/2013: Red Sonja #79 - ????

====

08/2013: Red Sonja #2 - 18,327 (-40.0%)
08/2013: Red Sonja #80 - 5,066 (???)
09/2013: Red Sonja #3 - 15,928 (-13.1%)
10/2013: Red Sonja #4 - 15,128 (-5.0%)
11/2013: Red Sonja #5 - 13,811 (-8.7%)
12/2013: Red Sonja #6 - 13,291 (-3.7%)
01/2014: Li'l Sonja #1 - 5,465
02/2014: Red Sonja #7 - 12,622 (-5.0%)
02/2014: Red Sonja Berserker - 5,810
04/2014: Red Sonja #8 - 12,392 (-1.8%)
04/2014: Red Sonja and Cub - 5,877
05/2014: Red Sonja #9 - 11,850 (-4.4%)
06/2014: Red Sonja #10 - 11,685 (-1.4%)
06/2014: Red Sonja Sanctuary - 5,486
07/2014: Red Sonja #0 - 9,009

This #0 backfired a little, it’s by the regular team, but retailers took the opportunity to cut 2,600 copies off their orders.

241, 251. Caliban (Avatar)

04/2014: Caliban #1 - 13,196
05/2014: Caliban #2 - 9,454 (-28.4%)
06/2014: Caliban #3 - 9,506 (+0.5%)
07/2014: Caliban #4 - 8,986 (-5.5%)
07/2014: Caliban #3 - 8,300 (-7.6%)

Have I mentioned how much I like this book? Two issues this month.

242. Sonic the Hedgehog (Archie)

07/2013: Sonic #251 - 12,782

====

08/2013: -
09/2013: Sonic #252 - 10,968 (-14.2%)
10/2013: Sonic #253 - 10,982 (+0.1%)
10/2013: Sonic #254 - 10,585 (-3.6%)
11/2013: -
12/2013: Sonic #255 - 10,422 (-1.5%)
01/2014: Sonic #256 - 9,840 (-5.6%)
02/2014: Sonic #257 - 9,325 (-5.2%)
03/2014: Sonic #258 - 9,023 (-3.2%)
04/2014: Sonic #259 - 6,228 (9,495)(+5.2%)
05/2014: Sonic #260 - 8,866 (-6.6%)
06/2014: Sonic #261 - 8,822 (-0.5%)
07/2014: Sonic #262 - 8,971 (+1.7%)

Slightly up this month.

243. The Woods (Boom!)

05/2014: The Woods #1 - 13,916
06/2014: The Woods #2 - 9,352 (-32.8%)
07/2014: The Woods #3 - 8,852 (-5.3%)

Starting to find a level.

244. Borderlands Origins (IDW)

11/2012: Borderlands Origins #1 - 6,409
12/2012: Borderlands Origins #2 - 5,040 (-21.4%)
01/2013: Borderlands Origins #3 - 5,572 (+10.6%)
02/2013: Borderlands Origins #4 - 5,581 (+0.2%)
07/2014: Borderlands Fall of Fyrestone #1 - 8,830 (+58.2%)

A big increase for this new series.

245, 264. Harbinger (Valiant)

07/2013: Harbinger #14 - 10,709

====

08/2013: Harbinger #15 - 12,086 (+12.9%)
09/2013: Harbinger #16 - 10,199 (-15.6%)
10/2013: Harbinger #17 - 10,686 (+4.8%)
11/2013: Harbinger #18 - 9,203 (-13.9%)
12/2013: Harbinger #19 - 9,237 (+0.4%)
01/2014: Harbinger #20 - 9,060 (-1.9%)
02/2014: Harbinger #21 - 8,473 (-6.5%)
03/2014: Harbinger Bleeding Monk #0 - 8,423
04/2014: Harbinger #22 - 8,213 (-3.1%)
05/2014: Harbinger #23 - 8,011 (-2.5%)
06/2014: Harbinger #24 - 7,256 (-9.4%)
07/2014: Harbinger #25 - 8,766 (+20.8%)
07/2014: Armour Hunters Harbinger #1 - 7,518 (-14.2%)

Not great sales really.

246. Transformers Robots In Disguise (IDW)

07/2013: Transformers Robots In Disguise #19 - 9,564

====

08/2013: Transformers Robots In Disguise #20 - 9,218 (-3.6%)
09/2013: -
10/2013: Transformers Robots In Disguise #21 - 9,220 (0%)
10/2013: Transformers Robots In Disguise #22 - 9,044 (-1.9%)
11/2013: Transformers Robots In Disguise #23 - 10,355 (+14.5%)
12/2013: Transformers Robots In Disguise #24 - 9,812 (-5.2%)
01/2014: Transformers Robots In Disguise #25 - 9,609 (-2.1%)
02/2014: Transformers Robots In Disguise #26 - 9,535 (-0.7%)
03/2014: Transformers Robots In Disguise #27 - 9,409 (-1.3%)
04/2014: Transformers Robots In Disguise #28 - 9,568 (+1.7%)
05/2014: Transformers Robots In Disguise #29 - 9,543 (-0.3%)
06/2014: Transformers Robots In Disguise #30 - 9,714 (+1.8%)
07/2014: Transformers Robots In Disguise #31 - 8,706 (-10.4%)

That’s a surprisingly big drop, I suspect there may be some copies that missed the chart but we’ll see next month.

247. Unity (Valiant)

11/2013: Unity #1 - 60,003
12/2013: Unity #2 - 18,845 (-68.6%)
01/2014: Unity #3 - 13,277 (-29.5%)
02/2014: Unity #4 - 10,644 (-19.8%)
03/2014: Unity #5 - 12,268 (+15.3%)
04/2014: Unity #6 - 9,351 (-23.8%)
05/2014: Unity #7 - 8,653 (-7.5%)
06/2014: Unity #8 - 9,442 (+9.1%)
07/2014: Unity #9 - 8,485 (-10.1%)

All of last month’s increase lost.

248. Black Market (Boom!)

07/2014: Black Market #1 - 8,414

Kind of a superhero Breaking Bad, with an out of work doctor sucked into an illicit world of superhero DNA harvesting. It’s rather good, written by Frank Barbiere.

253. King Conan (Dark Horse)

07/2013: Hour of The Dragon #3 - 9,319

====

08/2013: Hour of The Dragon #4 - 9,492 (+1.9%)
09/2013: Hour of The Dragon #5 - 9,358 (-1.4%)
10/2013: Hour of The Dragon #6 - 9,131 (-2.4%)
02/2014: Conqueror #1 - 9,646 (+5.6%)
03/2014: Conqueror #2 - 8,495 (-11.9%)
04/2014: Conqueror #3 - 8,519 (+0.3%)
05/2014: Conqueror #4 - 8,428 (-1.1%)
06/2014: Conqueror #5 - 8,376 (-0.6%)
07/2014: Conqueror #6 - 8,171 (-2.4%)
254. Aphrodite IX (Image)

07/2013: Aphrodite IX #3 - 9,339 (-0.8%)

====

08/2013: Aphrodite IX #4 - 9,186 (-1.6%)
09/2013: -
10/2013: Aphrodite IX #5 - ???? (???)
11/2013: Aphrodite IX #6 - 5,830 (???)
01/2014: Aphrodite IX #7 - 5,404 (-7.3%)
02/2014: Aphrodite IX #8 - 4,998 (-7.5%)
03/2014: Aphrodite IX #9 - 5,352 (+7.1%)
05/2014: Aphrodite IX #10 - 5,211 (-2.6%)
07/2014: Aphrodite IX/ Cyber Force #1 - 8,115 (+55.7%)
255. Chaos (Dynamite)

05/2014: Chaos #1 - 19,537
06/2014: Chaos #2 - 10,399 (-46.8%)
07/2014: Chaos #3 - 8,097 (-22.1%)
256. BPRD (Dark Horse)

07/2013: Hell on Earth #109 - 10,018

====

08/2013: Hell on Earth #110 - 9,842 (-1.8%)
09/2013: Hell on Earth #111 - 9,587 (-2.5%)
10/2013: Hell on Earth #112 - 9,497 (-0.9%)
11/2013: Hell on Earth #113 - 8,904 (-6.2%)
12/2013: Hell on Earth #114 - 8,668 (-2.6%)
01/2014: Hell on Earth #115 - 9,072 (+4.7%)
02/2014: Hell on Earth #116 - 8,674 (-4.4%)
03/2014: Hell on Earth #117 - 8,510 (-1.9%)
04/2014: Hell on Earth #118 - 8,473 (-0.4%)
05/2014: Hell on Earth #119 - 8,306 (-2.0%)
06/2014: Hell on Earth #120 - 8,127 (-2.2%)
07/2014: Hell on Earth #121 - 8,092 (-0.4%)
257, 259. God is Dead (Avatar)

09/2013: God Is Dead #1 - 26,664
10/2013: God Is Dead #2 - 15,366 (-42.4%)
11/2013: God Is Dead #3 - 14,930 (-2.8%)
12/2013: God Is Dead #4 - 13,369 (-10.5%)
01/2014: God Is Dead #5 - 11,897 (-11.0%)
02/2014: God Is Dead #6 - 12,852 (+8.0%)
02/2014: God Is Dead #7 - 12,008 (-6.6%)
03/2014: God Is Dead #8 - 11,515 (-4.1%)
03/2014: God Is Dead #9 - 10,976 (-4.7%)
04/2014: God Is Dead #10 - 10,564 (-3.7%)
04/2014: God Is Dead #11 - 10,326 (-2.3%)
05/2014: God Is Dead #12 - 9,275 (-10.2%)
05/2014: God Is Dead #13 - 8,987 (-3.1%)
06/2014: God Is Dead #14 - 8,373 (-6.8%)
06/2014: God Is Dead #15 - 8,262 (-1.3%)
07/2014: God Is Dead #16 - 8,029 (-2.8%)
07/2014: God Is Dead #17 - 7,759 (-3.4%)
258. Cartoon Network Super Secret Crisis War (IDW)

06/2014: Cartoon Network Super Secret Crisis War #1 - 10,155
07/2014: Cartoon Network Super Secret Crisis War #2 - 7,800 (-23.2%)
260. Sonic Universe (Archie)

07/2013: Sonic Universe #54 - 11,398

====

08/2013: Sonic Universe #55 - 9,239 (-18.9%)
09/2013: Sonic Universe #56 - 9,253 (+0.1%)
10/2013: Sonic Universe #57 - 8,874 (-4.1%)
11/2013: Sonic Universe #58 - 8,433 (-5.0%)
12/2013: Sonic Universe #59 - 8,123 (-3.7%)
01/2014: -
02/2014: Sonic Universe #60 - 7,902 (-2.7%)
03/2014: Sonic Universe #61 - 7,715 (-2.4%)
04/2014: Sonic Universe #62 - 7,927 (-2.7%)
05/2014: Sonic Universe #63 - 7,507 (-5.3%)
06/2014: Sonic Universe #64 - 7,423 (-1.1%)
07/2014: Sonic Universe #65 - 7,664 (+3.2%)
261. Elfquest (Dark Horse)

10/2013: Elfquest Final Quest Special - 9,680
01/2014: Elfquest Final Quest #1 - 9,861 (+1.9%)
03/2014: Elfquest Final Quest #2 - 8,390 (-14.9%)
05/2014: Elfquest Final Quest #3 - 7,967 (-5.0%)
07/2014: Elfquest Final Quest #4 - 7,662 (-3.7%)
262. Star Trek Special (IDW)

07/2014: Flesh & Stone #1
263, 281. Twilight Zone (Dynamite)

12/2013: Twilight Zone #1 - 21,723
01/2014: Twilight Zone #2 - 11,537 (-46.9%)
02/2014: Twilight Zone #3 - 10,061 (-12.8%)
03/2014: -
04/2014: Twilight Zone #4 - 9,014 (-10.4%)
05/2014: Twilight Zone #5 - 8,140 (-9.7%)
06/2014: Twilight Zone Annual 2014 - 5,154
07/2014: Twilight Zone #6 - 7,528 (-7.5%)
07/2014: Twilight Zone #7 - 6,976 (-7.3%)
266. Abe Sapien (Dark Horse )

07/2013: Abe Sapien #4 - 10,314

====

08/2013: Abe Sapien #5 - 9,676 (-6.2%)
09/2014: -
10/2013: Abe Sapien #6 - 9,120 (-5.7%)
11/2013: Abe Sapien #7 - 8,709 (-4.5%)
12/2013: Abe Sapien #8 - 8,622 (-1.0%)
01/2014: Abe Sapien #9 - 8,516 (-1.2%)
02/2014: Abe Sapien #10 - 7,995 (-6.1%)
03/2014: Abe Sapien #11 - 7,825 (-2.1%)
04/2014: -
05/2014: Abe Sapien #12 - 7,559 (-3.4%)
06/2014: Abe Sapien #13 - 7,674 (+1.5%)
07/2014: Abe Sapien #14 - 7,469 (-2.7%)
267. Uber (Avatar)

07/2013: Uber #4 - 12,030

====

08/2013: Uber #5 - 11,598 (-3.6%)
10/2013: Uber #6 - 10,747 (-7.3%)
11/2013: Uber #7 - 9,784 (-9.0%)
12/2013: Uber #8 - 9,065 (-7.3%)
01/2014: Uber #9 - 8,448 (-6.8%)
03/2014: Uber #10 - 8,133 (-3.7%)
03/2014: Uber Special #1 - 7,176
04/2014: Uber #11 - 7,732 (-4.9%)
04/2014: Uber #12 - 7,694 (-0.5%)
05/2014: Uber #13 - 7,653 (-0.5%)
06/2014: Uber #14 - 7,493 (-2.1%)
07/2014: Uber #15 - 7,456 (-0.5%)
268. Sons of Anarchy (Boom!) 

09/2013: Sons of Anarchy #1 - 27,601
10/2013: Sons of Anarchy #2 - 14,688 (-46.8%)
11/2013: Sons of Anarchy #3 - 13,251 (-9.8%)
12/2013: Sons of Anarchy #4 - 12,215 (-7.8%)
01/2014: Sons of Anarchy #5 - 11,607 (-5.0%)
02/2014: Sons of Anarchy #6 - 11,228 (-3.3%)
03/2014: Sons of Anarchy #7 - 9,910 (-11.7%)
04/2014: Sons of Anarchy #8 - 9,304 (-6.1%)
05/2014: Sons of Anarchy #9 - 8,511 (-8.5%)
06/2014: Sons of Anarchy #10 - 7,857 (-7.7%)
07/2014: Sons of Anarchy #11 - 7,394 (-5.9%)
270. Turok, Dinosaur Hunter (Dynamite)

02/2014: Turok Dinosaur Hunter #1 - 30,722
03/2014: Turok Dinosaur Hunter #2 - 11,296 (-6.3%)
04/2014: Turok Dinosaur Hunter #3 - 9,586 (-15.1%)
05/2014: Turok Dinosaur Hunter #4 - 8,426 (-12.1%)
06/2014: Turok Dinosaur Hunter #5 - 7,803 (-7.4%)
07/2014: Turok Dinosaur Hunter #6 - 7,352 (-5.8%)
271. Bloodshot (Valiant)

07/2013: Bloodshot #12 - 10,058

====

08/2013: Bloodshot #0 - 11,303 (+12.4%)
09/2013: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #14 - 10,225 (-9.5%)
10/2013: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #15 - 9,806 (-4.1%)
11/2013: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #16 - 8,666 (-11.6%)
12/2013: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #17 - 8,142 (-6.0%)
01/2014: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #18 - 8,529 (+4.8%)
02/2014: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #0 - 7,895 (-7.4%)
02/2014: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #19 - 7,281 (-7.8%)
03/2014: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #20 - 7,929 (+8.9%)
04/2014: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #21 - 7,630 (-3.8%)
05/2014: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #22 - 7,350 (-3.7%)
06/2014: Bloodshot & The Hard Corps #23 - 6,783 (-7.7%)
07/2014: Armour Hunters Bloodshot #1 - 7,334 (+8.1%)
272. Doctor Spektor (Dynamite)

05/2014: Doctor Spektor #1 - 16,471
06/2014: Doctor Spektor #2 - 7,318 (-55.6%)
274. Baltimore (Dark Horse) 

09/2013: Baltimore Infernal Train #1 - 8,280 (-0.3%)
10/2013: Baltimore Infernal Train #2 - 7,374 (-10.9%)
11/2013: Baltimore Infernal Train #3 - 7,228 (-2.0%)
12/2013: Baltimore Chapel of Bones #1 - 7,250 (+0.3%)
02/2014: Baltimore Chapel of Bones #2 - 6,922 (-4.5%)
07/2014: Baltimore Witch of Harju #1 - 7,271 (+5.0%)
275. Mega Man (Archie) 

07/2013: Mega Man #27 - 10,332

====

08/2013: Mega Man #28 - 8,404 (-18.7%)
09/2013: Mega Man #29 - 8,042 (-4.3%)
10/2013: Mega Man #30 - 8,086 (+0.5%)
11/2013: Mega Man #31 - 7,854 (-2.8%)
12/2013: Mega Man #32 - 7,352 (-6.4%)
01/2014: Mega Man #33 - 7,015 (-4.6%)
02/2014: -
03/2014: Mega Man #34 - 6,688 (-4.7%)
04/2014: Mega Man #35 - 6,681 (-0.1%)
04/2014: Mega Man #36 - 6,400 (-4.2%)
05/2014: Mega Man #37 - 7,640 (+19.4%)
06/2014: Mega Man #38 - 6,604 (-13.6%)
07/2014: Mega Man #39 - 7,265 (+10.0%)
276. The Veil (Dark Horse)

03/2014: Veil #1 - 14,445
04/2014: Veil #2 - 9,627 (-33.3%)
05/2014: Veil #3 - 8,184 (-15.0%)
07/2014: Veil #4 - 7,222 (-11.7%)
277, 298. Magnus Robot Fighter (Dynamite)

03/2014: Magnus Robot Fighter #1 - 27,497
04/2014: Magnus Robot Fighter #2 - 9,898 (-64.0%)
05/2014: Magnus Robot Fighter #3 - 8,333 (-15.8%)
06/2014: Magnus Robot Fighter #4 - 7,898 (-5.2%)
07/2014: Magnus Robot Fighter #5 - 7,205 (-8.8%)
07/2014: Magnus Robot Fighter #0 - 6,640 (-7.8%)
278. TMNT New Animated Adventures (IDW)

07/2013: TMNT New Animated Adventures #1 - 14,397

====

08/2013: TMNT New Animated Adventures #2 - 10,304 (-28.4%)
09/2013: TMNT New Animated Adventures #3 - 8,744 (-15.1%)
10/2013: TMNT New Animated Adventures #4 - 7,905 (-9.6%)
11/2013: TMNT New Animated Adventures #5 - 7,112 (-10.0%)
12/2013: TMNT New Animated Adventures #6 - 6,649 (-6.5%)
01/2014: TMNT New Animated Adventures #7 - 6,331 (-4.8%)
02/2014: TMNT New Animated Adventures #8 - 6,034 (-4.7%)
03/2014: TMNT New Animated Adventures #9 - 6,009 (-0.4%)
04/2014: TMNT New Animated Adventures #10 - 5,911 (-1.6%)
05/2014: TMNT New Animated Adventures #11 - 6,075 (+2.8%)
06/2014: TMNT New Animated Adventures #12 - 7,577 (+24.7%)
07/2014: TMNT New Animated Adventures #13 - 7,158 (-5.5%)
279. Godzilla (IDW)

07/2013: Godzilla #13 - 6,741

====

08/2013: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #2 - 7,483 (-23.7%)
08/2013: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #3 - 7,080 (-5.4%)
09/2013: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #4 - 6,820 (-3.7%)
10/2013: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #5 - 6,920 (+1.4%)
11/2013: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #6 - 6,653 (-3.9%)
12/2013: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #7 - 6,587 (-0.9%)
01/2014: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #8 - 6,530 (-0.8%)
02/2014: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #9 - 6,531 (0%)
03/2014: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #10 - 6,677 (+0.2%)
04/2014: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #11 - 6,917 (-3.6%)
05/2014: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #12 - 7.890 (+14.1%)
06/2014: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #13 - 6,980 (-11.5%)
07/2014: Godzilla Rulers of The Earth #14 - 7,144 (+2.3%)
280. Wonderland (Zenescope)

07/2013: Wonderland #13 - 7,253

====

08/2013: -
09/2013: Wonderland #14 - 7,034 (-3.0%)
09/2013: Wonderland #15 - 6,558 (-6.8%)
10/2013: Wonderland #16 - 6,820 (+4.0%)
11/2013: Wonderland #17 - 6,723 (-1.4%)
12/2013: Wonderland #18 - 7,859 (+16.9%)
01/2014: Wonderland #19 - 6,434 (-18.1%)
02/2014: Wonderland #20 - 5,780 (-10.2%)
03/2014: Wonderland #21 - 5,937 (+2.7%)
04/2014: Wonderland #22 - 5,374 (-9.5%)
05/2014: Wonderland #23 - 5,313 (-1.1%)
06/2014: Wonderland #24 - 5,261 (-1.0%)
07/2014: Wonderland #25 - 7,030 (+33.6%)
282. Stray Bullets (Image)

03/2014: Stray Bullets #41 - 8,297
03/2014: Stray Bullets The Killers #1 - 14,208
04/2014: Stray Bullets The Killers #2 - 9,147 (-35.6%)
05/2014: Stray Bullets The Killers #3 - 7,935 (-13.2%)
06/2014: Stray Bullets The Killers #4 - 7,092 (-10.6%)
07/2014: Stray Bullets The Killers #5 - 6,938 (-1.5%)
284. Sidekick (Image)

08/2013: Sidekick #1 - 27,832
09/2013: Sidekick #2 - 14,533 (-47.8%)
10/2013: Sidekick #3 - 11,371 (-21.8%)
11/2013: Sidekick #4 - 9,976 (-12.3%)
02/2014: Sidekick #5 - 8,943 (-10.3%)
04/2014: Sidekick #6 - 8,192 (-8.4%)
07/2014: Sidekick #7 - 6,900 (-15.8%)
285. Archer & Armstrong (Valiant)

07/2013: Archer & Armstrong #11 - 9,880

====

08/2013: Archer & Armstrong #12 - 9,971 (+0.9%)
09/2013: Archer & Armstrong #13 - 9,910 (-0.6%)
10/2013: Archer & Armstrong #14 - 10,811 (+9.1%)
11/2013: Archer & Armstrong #15 - 8,998 (-16.8%)
12/2013: Archer & Armstrong #16 - 8,608 (-4.3%)
01/2014: Archer & Armstrong #17 - 8,112 (-5.8%)
02/2014: Archer & Armstrong #0 - 8,671 (+6.9%)
03/2014: Archer & Armstrong #18 - 8,156 (+0.5%)
04/2014: Archer & Armstrong #19 - 7,969 (-2.3%)
05/2014: Archer & Armstrong #20 - 7,553 (-5.2%)
06/2014: Archer & Armstrong #21 - 7,120 (-5.7%)
07/2014: Archer & Armstrong #22 - 6,883 (-3.3%)
286. Danger Girl (IDW)

07/2013: Danger Girl Trinity #4 - 7,790

====

08/2013: -
09/2013: Danger Girl The Chase #1 - 10,180 (+30.7%)
10/2013: Danger Girl The Chase #2 - 8,067 (-20.8%)
11/2013: Danger Girl The Chase #3 - 7,738 (-4.1%)
12/2013: Danger Girl The Chase #4 - 7,411 (-4.2%)
04/2014: Danger Girl Mayday #1 - 9,051 (+22.1%)
05/2014: Danger Girl Mayday #2 - 6,945 (-23.3%)
07/2014: Danger Girl Mayday #3 - 6,872 (-1.1%)
288. Wildfire (Image)

06/2014: Wildfire #1 - 12,552
07/2014: Wildfire #2 - 6,806 (-45.8%)
289. Grimm Fairy Tales Oz (Zenescope)

07/2013: GFT Oz #1 - 19,237
08/2013: GFT Oz #2 - 11,119 (-42.2%)
10/2013: GFT Oz #3 - 10,537 (-5.2%)
11/2013: GFT Oz #4 - 12,064 (+14.5%)
12/2013: GFT Oz #5 - 10,158 (-15.8%)
02/2014: GFT Oz #6 - 9,631 (-5.2%)
03-04/2014: -
05/2014: Warlord of Oz #1 - 7,787 (-19.1%)
06/2014: Warlord of Oz #2 - 5,810 (-25.4%)
07/2014: Oz Age of Darkness - 6,784
290. Black Kiss (Image)

07/2014: Black Kiss XXXmas In July Special One Shot - 6,777
291. Samurai Jack (IDW)

10/2013: Samurai Jack #1 - 23,661
11/2013: Samurai Jack #2 - 12,645 (-46.6%)
12/2013: Samurai Jack #3 - 11,553 (-8.6%)
01/2014: Samurai Jack #4 - 10,451 (-9.5%)
02/2014: Samurai Jack #5 - 9,989 (-4.4%)
03/2014: Samurai Jack #6 - 8,960 (-10.3%)
04/2014: Samurai Jack #7 - 8,990 (+0.3%)
05/2014: Samurai Jack #8 - 8,471 (-5.8%)
06/2014: Samurai Jack #9 - 8,464 (-0.8%)
07/2014: Samurai Jack #10 - 6,741 (-20.4%)
292. Regular Show (Boom!)

07/2013: -

====

08/2013: Regular Show #3 - 16,000 (-18.0%)
09/2013: -
10/2013: Regular Show #4 - 15,269 (-4.6%)
11/2013: Regular Show #5 - 12,677 (-17.0%)
11/2013: Regular Show #6 - 11,213 (-11.6%)
12/2013: Regular Show #7 - 10,733 (-4.2%)
01/2014: Regular Show #8 - 9,201 (-14.3%)
02/2014: Regular Show #9 - 8,554 (-7.0%)
02/2014: Regular Show #10 - 7,623 (-10.9%)
03/2014: Regular Show #11 - 7,084 (-7.1%)
04/2014: Regular Show #12 - 6,540 (-7.7%)
05/2014: -
06/2014: Regular Show 2014 Annual - 5,377 (-7.7%)
07/2014: Regular Show #13 - 6,724 (+2.8%)
293. GI Joe Real American Hero (IDW)

07/2013: Real American Hero #192 - 7,361

====

08/2013: Real American Hero #193 - 7,314 (-0.6%)
09/2013: -
10/2013: Real American Hero #194 - 7,314 (0%)
10/2013: Real American Hero #195 - 7,135 (-2.4%)
11/2013: Real American Hero #196 - 8,102 (+13.6%)
12/2013: Real American Hero #197 - 6,983 (-13.8%)
01/2014: Real American Hero #198 - 6,736 (-3.5%)
02/2014: Real American Hero #199 - 6,652 (-1.2%)
03/2014: Real American Hero #200 - 11,780 (+77.1%)
04/2014: Real American Hero #201 - 8,294 (-29.6%)
05/2014: Real American Hero #202 - 6,781 (-18.2%)
06/2014: Real American Hero #203 - 6,791 (+0.1%)
07/2014: Real American Hero #204 - 6,706 (-1.3%)
296. Robocop (Boom)

08/2013: Robocop Last Stand #1 - 9,959
09/2013: Robocop Last Stand #2 - 7,476 (-24.9%)
10/2013: Robocop Last Stand #3 - 6,868 (-8.1%)
11/2013: Robocop Last Stand #4 - 5,923 (-13.8%)
12/2013: Robocop Last Stand #5 - 5,368 (-9.4%)
01/2014: Robocop Last Stand #6 - 5,042 (-6.1%)
02/2014: Robocop Last Stand #7 - 4,975 (-1.3%)
02/2014: Robocop Beta One Shot - 4,263
07/2014: Robocop 2014 #1 - 6,676
299. Angry Birds (IDW)

06/2014: Angry Birds Comics #1 - 11,939
07/2014: Angry Birds Comics #2 - 6,629 (-44.5%)
300. GFT Realm Knights (Zenescope)

08/2013: GFT Realm Knights #1 - 6,550
07/2014: GFT Realm War #1 - 6,620

======

All figures on this chart are estimates for comics sold by Diamond to direct market retailers. They include reorders that shipped in the same month. Books shipping in the first week of a month will have more time for reorders to appear than ones shipping in the last week of the month, when reorders will slip to the following month.

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3. Watch Simon Hanselmann marry comics — the full video

At SPX, following the Ignatz awards, a very special wedding took place, as cartoonist Simon Hanselmann, author of Megahex, wed comics in a ceremony presided over by SPX Executive Director Michael Thomas. Michel DeForge, currently on tour with Hanselmann, stood in for comics, althuogh several acual comics were present. Hanselmann, who is a cross dresser, appeared in a lovely wedding gown, and a brass band serenaded the wedding party which consisted of Annie Koyama, Annie Mock, Jason Leivian, Sean T. Collins, Julia Gfrörer and Gary Groth.

When I first heard about this, I thought it was going to be funny but cringeworthy, but it turned out to be funny and memorable in a very performance arty way. Hansellman wrote vows that were amusing and accurate at the same time, and since everyone falls in love with comics all over again at SPX, making the union legal seemed a very appropriate thing to do.

As you’ll see, the big moment came when Hanselmann’s publisher Groth jumped up at the end to kiss the bride and kiss the two did. Which again, is usually what happens when you fall passionately in love with someone, or even comics. Brigid Alverson has some still photos and the money shot but you’ll have to go here to see that.

After the ceremony, Hanselmann cut a giant wedding cake, eventually tearing out chunks with his bare hands and giving them out as other attendees cavorted around the chocolate fountain and an equally enthusiastic and fun prom got under way a few meeting rooms down. People will be saying they were there for this for years to come. The social aspect of SPX has always been one of the biggest appeals of the show—I remember back in the day at the picnic people climbed trees and threw water balloons at each other. In a wacky way, this was the perfect update.

This was DEFINITELY an SPX to remember!

Hanselman and Thomas Watch Simon Hanselmann marry comics    the full video

Photo by Brigid Alverson

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4. Walker and Evely announced as creative team on Dynamite’s SHAFT

Shaft01 Cov A Cowan Walker and Evely announced as creative team on Dynamites SHAFT

Dynamite announced they would be doing a Shaft comic book a few months back, and now they have announced the creative team: David F. Walker and Bilquis Evely. Walker is a writer and filmmaker and one look at his blog BadAzz Mofo will tell you he’s a complicated man. Plus he wrote a book on blaxploitation films so, yep. that works. Evely is a Brazillian artist who isn’t an obvious choice, but an intriguing one. Variant covers are by Francesco Francavilla, Michael Avon Oeming, Ulises Farinas, Matt Haley, Sanford Greene, and a collaboration between Denys Cowan and Bill Sienkiewicz, so you’ll all be wanting that one.

Dynamite Entertainment is proud to announce the signing of writer David F. Walker and artist Bilquis Evely to its upcoming Shaft comic book, based on the hard-hitting detective created by novelist Ernest Tidyman and popularized in films featuring Richard Roundtree and Samuel L. Jackson. Slated for release in December, Shaft #1 celebrates the 45th anniversary of an American icon with a wealth of cover art options by industry talents including Francesco Francavilla, Michael Avon Oeming, Ulises Farinas, Matt Haley, Sanford Greene, and a landmark collaboration between Denys Cowan and Bill Sienkiewicz.

John Shaft, described as a “tough, take-no-guff detective” and “private dick that’s a sex machine to all the chicks” in composer/singer Isaac Hayes’ Oscar-winning Theme from Shaft, has gone toe-to-toe with organized crime bosses, stood up to the cops, squared off against kidnappers, and foiled assassination attempts in his novel and film appearances. But who was John Shaft before he became the hardboiled investigator with a reputation as big as New York City itself? For the first time ever, the detective’s origins are explored, courtesy of the new series by Dynamite Entertainment.

“Working on Shaft, one of the most iconic characters in pop culture, is a dream come true,” says David F. Walker. “I’ve been a fan of the character since I was a kid, and especially love him in his original iteration, as created by author Ernest Tidyman. My take on Shaft is steeped in Tidyman’s work, and builds on the world created in the original novels. I’m exploring who he is as a man, as a private detective, and as a cold-blooded killer. This John Shaft is much grittier, more badass, with a complexity never seen in the films. The name may be familiar, and some aspects of the character may be recognizable, but at the end of the day, he will be something new and exciting – especially in the world of comics. This is Shaft the way Shaft was meant to be.”

David F. Walker is an award-winning journalist, filmmaker, and author of the Young Adult series The Adventures of Darius Logan. His publication BadAzz MoFo became internationally known as the indispensable resource guide to black films of the 1970s, and he is co-author of the book Reflections on Blaxploitation: Actors and Directors Speak. His work in comics includes the series Number 13 (Dark Horse Comics), The Army of Dr. Moreau(Monkeybrain Comics), and The Supernals Experiment (Canon Comics).

Bilquis Evely is a rising star on Dynamite’s roster of talented artists. Recently she worked alongside writer Chris Roberson on the critically acclaimedDoc Savage miniseries. Her other works include The Shadow / Green Hornet: Dark Nights crossover event with writer Michael Uslan, The Shadow Annual#1, and Miss Fury. Evely’s experience with Dynamite’s pulp heroes has made her the perfect fit for the mean streets of 1970’s New York City in Shaft.

“The response by the media and fans over the announcement of a Shaft comic book series was nothing short of electric,” says Nick Barrucci, Publisher and CEO of Dynamite Entertainment. “Frankly, there’s no one better suited to take the reins on this project than David F. Walker, whose vast knowledge of and appreciation for the genre have been welcome and invaluable in our launch of the Shaft series. Combining his energetic take on this superbad private detective with Bilquis Evely’s impressive artistic skills, and we have all the makings of an explosive comic for Shaft fans to love.”

Shaft #1 will be solicited in Diamond Comic Distributors’ October Previews catalog, the premiere source of merchandise for the comic book specialty market, and slated for release in December. Comic book fans are encouraged to reserve copies of Shaft #1 with their local comic book retailers. Shaft will also be available for individual customer purchase through digital platforms courtesy of Comixology, iVerse, and Dark Horse Digital.

Shaft01 Cov C OemingB Walker and Evely announced as creative team on Dynamites SHAFT

Shaft01 Cov F SubGreen Walker and Evely announced as creative team on Dynamites SHAFT

Shaft01 Cov B Francavilla Walker and Evely announced as creative team on Dynamites SHAFT

Shaft01 Cov D Farinas Walker and Evely announced as creative team on Dynamites SHAFT

Shaft01 Cov E Haley Walker and Evely announced as creative team on Dynamites SHAFT

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5. Marvel releases official synopsis of AVENGERS: THE AGE OF ULTRON

The Avengers 2 Marvel releases official synopsis of AVENGERS: THE AGE OF ULTRON
…and it will be a unique global adventure!

Marvel Studios presents Avengers: Age of Ultron, the epic follow-up to the biggest Super Hero movie of all time. When Tony Stark tries to jumpstart a dormant peacekeeping program, things go awry and Earth’s Mightiest Heroes, including Iron Man, Captain America, Thor, The Incredible Hulk, Black Widow and Hawkeye, are put to the ultimate test as the fate of the planet hangs in the balance. As the villainous Ultron emerges, it is up to The Avengers to stop him from enacting his terrible plans, and soon uneasy alliances and unexpected action pave the way for an epic and unique global adventure.

Marvel’s Avengers: Age of Ultron stars Robert Downey Jr., who returns as Iron Man, along with Chris Evans as Captain America, Chris Hemsworth as Thor and Mark Ruffalo as The Hulk. Together with Scarlett Johansson as Black Widow and Jeremy Renner as Hawkeye, and with the additional support of Samuel L. Jackson as Nick Fury and Cobie Smulders as Agent Maria Hill, the team must reassemble to defeat James Spader as Ultron, a terrifying technological villain hell – bent on human extinction. Along the way, they confront two mysterious and powerful newcomers, Wanda Maximoff, played by Elizabeth Olsen, and Pietro Maximoff, played by Aaron Taylor-Johnson, and meet an old friend in a new form when Paul Bettany becomes Vision.


That “dormant peacekeeping program” was alluded to in Cap 2 unless I’m imagining things, soooooo.…and it will be a unique global adventure!

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6. Kibbles ‘n’ Bits 9/16/14: a lot to chew on

I’ve been travelling for the last three weeks and there are even more kibbles and bits than usual piled up. Some of these are pretty old, but it would be so sad to let all those bookmarks I squirreled away go to waste. But first…

§ Pulitzer Prize winning editorial cartoonist Tony Auth has died at age 72.

§ Cartoonist Liza Donnelly profiled at Forbes..

§ Headline of the day! Comic book convention comes to Ramada Inn

§ Headline of the day 2! Comic books enjoy a surge in popularity

§ Related! At Dragon Con, Beat contributior Kyle Pinion and a couple of others explained why

 

Why the comics industry is doing better than ever:

The panelists unanimously agreed that it’s a great time to be a comics seller.

“You just keep thinking it’s going to go die down,” said Tarney, speaking of what he described as the slow ascension of comics into the mainstream over the last three decades, “but then, bam! Arrow is huge and Walking Dead is huge, and you’re seeing more people into more things, and more people are exploring comics as a genre and as a form of media.”

Ludgood agreed, but pointed out that while comics have never actually left the cultural spotlight since the golden age of vintage superheroes, the current trend of adapting non-native characters into comic book form means more people wanting to buy the comic book versions of their favorite characters. (Think recent comic and manga adaptations and continuations of Twilight, The Last Airbender, Buffy, and other pop culture favorites.)

 

§ Michael Dooley takes a look at two recent books about cartoonists, the Monte Beachamp-edited Blab-like, Masterful Marks: Cartoonists Who Changed the World and Drew Friedman’s Heroes of the Comics.

§ One site that should be bookmarked is Women Write About Comics , which has lots of excellent writing including some from an academic or library viewpoint. Two pieces I enjoyed are Ivy Noelle Weir’s 741.5: So, You Want To Host A Comic-Con At Your Library a step by step guide to doing just that, fearful moments and all. And also Katherine Tanski‘s Comics Academe: How Do You Teach Comics? which goes into some details:

If the department, colleague, or student balks at a 224-page text (although McCloud’s text is also not particularly expensive, especially compared to textbooks generally speaking), the first chapter of McCloud’s Making Comics, which did its best to condense Understanding Comics into one chapter, is probably sufficient for teaching purposes. (Sidenote: There is really nothing worthwhile to be find in McCloud’s follow up text to Understanding Comics,Reinventing Comics, except as a historical footnote, since it’s mainly theorizing about the possibilities for comics with the advent of computers and the internet, which did, in fact, happen.) However, the reason I did, and still would today, advocate for using the full Understanding Comics as a supplementary textbook to whatever comic you want to assign is because, in my experience, students take comics more seriously as a medium if there is an entire book they have to buy in order to understand it. It quickly disabuses them of the notion that a comic is going to be easier to read than a novel.

 

§ Back before Sin City 2 tanked so bad , there were many assessment’s of Frank Miller’s comics output, including this look at the new The Big Guy and Rusty the Boy Robot , which actually was only by Geof Darrow.
daredevil 158 01 Kibbles n Bits 9/16/14: a lot to chew on

Grantland’s Alex Pappedemas looked at Miller’s entire oeuvre.

On the first page of Daredevil No. 158, the Black Widow wipes away blood from a split lip, preparing to enter a melee already in progress. A text box in the corner trumpets the arrival of “Lanky Frank Miller,” a “truly great new artist” poised to “explode upon the Marvel scene like a bombshell.” This was hyperbole even by the hucksterish standard set by Stan Lee. It also turned out to be true.

 

§ A little while back a copy of Action #1 sold for $3.2 million; the buyers were Metropolis Comics, who expect to make a profit on it someday.

“We feel very confidently this was a good price and that we will be able to sell this for a profit. We really believe in the strength of the comic book market and that it has a long way to go,” Zurzolo tells The Hollywood Reporter. While declining to say how high they would have taken the bidding, he adds, “All I can say is we were determined to buy it.”

 

§ I had bookmarked this piece on the Salt Lake City Comic Con which detailed them having trouble proving a local economic impact.

§ I’m glad Vaneta Rogers exists so she can pore over all the evidence about Blood Moon an upcoming DC event.

§ 29 years ago, semiotician Umberto Eco was excited about Krazy Kat and Peanuts, and you can still read his essay.

§ Oh, this one is old but it says so much: The Drab Palettes of Modern Superhero Movies.

I don’t mean to pick on one synergistic chunk of intellectual property. Based on the images released so far, 2016’s Batman vs. Superman will max out its hues at a vibrant brown. The collective monomania of these superhero movies is bizarre and sad—if you must make so many of the things, why not cast your eyes beyond a couple of decades-old Frank Miller comics?

 

§ Congrats to our good buddies at Green Brain Comics on moving to a nice new store.

§ Here’s a blog post by by the winner of the Women’s Costume at the Baltimore Comic Con costume contest. You don’t often see these winners mentioned, so I did!


§ People were amazed by this video of Fantagraphics publisher Gary Groth with a broken pair of giant loppers that was found in a long abandoned closet…but there will be more Gary Groth videos to come.

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7. How to Survive Micro-Press Publishing at SPX

by Zachary Clemente

SPX Micropress How to Survive Micro Press Publishing at SPX

This past weekend, the 20th annual Small Press Expo (SPX) brought an explosion of independent and small press comics to the Marriott hotel in Bethesda, MD. Literally overflowing with an abundance of talent, the weekend was filled with amazing creators, signings, panels, even a wedding and a prom. One of the panels, Micro-Press and Beyond, discussed the findings of a study on micro-press comics publishers by moderator Robyn Chapman, who runs mini-comics publisher Paper Rocket, as well as posing the study’s questions to the panel participants. From left to right, the publishers are Chuck Forsman (Oily Comics), Keenan Marshall Keller (Drippy Bone Books), Anne Koyama (Koyama Press), and Raighne Hogan & Justin Skarhus (2D Cloud).

Chapman kicked off the panel by showing her findings, collected in The Tiny Report, a mini-comic she published, based on questions she sent to 52 micro-press publishers, which she defines as being “one-person publishing houses”. The purpose of the Tiny Report is to be a “micropress yearbook”, serving to be an aid in understanding and chronicling the comics micro-press movement. One by one, she took the panel through some of the questions she posed for the report, seeing how they affect each representing publisher. While the responses for Forsman, Keller, Hogan, and Skarhus were fairly uniform; Koyama, as a more established publisher had slightly different answers. Although all agreed the major challenge of publishing was funding, seeing it as the root of any other discussed challenges, such as distribution or marketing.

challenges How to Survive Micro Press Publishing at SPX

Data Collected by Robyn Chapman

The majority of the panel was an informative and lengthy discussion about how micro-publishing is in essence a massive clustercuss. Selling books to comic stores often requires very precise book-keeping, dealing with printing and shipping costs is a measured act of a madness, running the convention circuit can be emotionally and physically punishing, and even trying managing an online store or crowd-funding campaigns can be a full-time job. Despite all these hurdles, micro-press publishers have been springing up left and right to print minis and floppies, filling the void left by publishers left by publishers like Fantagraphics or Drawn & Quarterly, who now focus more on graphics novels, collections, or art books. Ultimately, the issues voiced come from a lack of steady funding as it’s not uncommon for an independent publisher to see a check for books sent to a store 6 months after the fact.

During the audience Q&A portion, a question I’ve been curious about was raised about artist contracts and compensation. Most of the publishers pay in copies or small royalties, depending from artist to artist and many don’t really bother with formal contracts. Only Koyama utilizes formal, customized contracts and pays a lump sum up front to each artist she works with.

“You’re an angel from Heaven.” – Forsman to Koyama

sold How to Survive Micro Press Publishing at SPX

Data Collected by Robyn Chapman

Lastly, on the word of submitting, all but Koyama takes submissions through email or convention drop-offs – all stating that finished or nearly finished work is ideal. Koyama bemoaned the fact that she often cannot find the names of people on their websites or tumblr pages and won’t be able to contact them. Koyama press rarely takes submissions, only publishing 10 books a year, all handpicked by Anne herself. Everyone agreed that the best possible policy for getting published is just “make a good comic.” When asked about the “Beyond” of micro-publishing, all wished for a climate where sustainable and local printing was a more affordable option, but for now, overseas printing is the most economical option.

This was my first time at SPX and it was an exceptional experience. I’ll be back next year and (hopefully) continuing small press coverage!

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8. SPX: Laser Eyes & Fire-Breath, Annie Koyama on Koyama Press

 

by Zachary Clemente

koyama SPX: Laser Eyes & Fire Breath, Annie Koyama on Koyama PressOn Sunday of the 20th annual Small Press Expo (SPX), The Beat grabbed a strange, backless hotel couch surrounded by vacated folding tables with Annie Koyama, the past, current, and future Publisher at Koyama Press, the renown Toronto-based small-press publisher dedicated to promoting and supporting a wide range of emerging and established artists. Their published work including comics, graphic novels, art books, and zines such as Safari Honeymoon, 100 Crushes, Very Casual, and Grey Supreme.

 

Comics Beat: As someone who has only recently been paying attention to Koayama Press, I’m curious what the “mission of Koyama Press” is and how it has evolved or changed over the years?

Annie Koyama: My mission is to help primarily emerging artists and get their work out there. But after seven years, I’m not only working with emerging artists anymore. [...] I’ve got Renee French and Julia Wertz here [at SPX], so that’s how it’s evolved. However, it hasn’t changed. I still choose to work with primarily emerging artists – it’s very satisfying to get their work out there.

CB: You originally came from producing films and commercials before jumping whole-hog into comics. What things came with you?

AK: Only that as a producer, I was organizing and managing stuff. Those skills are transferable to anything for the rest of life. I know how to organize stuff from events to tours – I can organize anything! I just transfer [those skills] to production schedules for going through a book, working with artists, that sort of thing. It’s all relatable.

Lose 3 Michael DeForge SPX: Laser Eyes & Fire Breath, Annie Koyama on Koyama Press

Lose #3 by Michael DeForge

CB: When working on your 10 books a year, do you consider the influence that the name Koyama Press carries on the independent comics scene?

AK: No…I choose what I like. I hope that what I put out influences the scene because someone who didn’t hear about Victor Kerlow will now know about Victor Kerlow or now they know about John Martz – so hopefully it’s influential in that way. I have to stand behind the work [I publish] for a good 10 years, so why would I publish anything I don’t love? I only do 10 books a year and work way too hard, so I have to love every single one of them.

CB: It is literally your name on the book.

AK: Yes, but it’s their [the artist's] name too, so I owe it to them to work my hardest to get their book out there. Some of the people who work with me could go to other publishers, but they choose not to – so I work hard for them because of that.

CB: On the panel about Micro-Press, you talked about the ethics of making comics, especially when printing overseas. What is your “ideal” comics-making world like?

AK: For comics printing? That everyone had enough money to print locally and employ local people. It’s very simple but it’s never going to happen so we make the best of it. I have that choice: I can print locally and [publish] far fewer books or I can choose to print more books and get more artists out there. So for now and since day one, I choose to get more artists out there.

CB: I would think a lot of people would say that a good way to accomplish that goal without the problems of physical printing would be a digital route. Has this been something you’ve considered?

AK: Yup! I’m moving into that in a month or so, it’ll be announced properly soon. I waited a long time because I didn’t like the resolution on some tablets and that sort of thing, but I think that it’s changed a lot. So soon, very soon.

CB: Would it be through ComiXology or something like that?

AK: It will be through one of those places initially, but it won’t be an exclusive thing.

CB: Have you seen The Private Eye? It’s a pay what you want digital comic formatted wide-screen hosted by the creators themselves. It’s an interesting that options like this are possible.

AK: Any of my artists could also do something like that, but there are people who would prefer to read their work in a certain format or through app so we hope people will buy from where we’re going. Though, some of my artists prefer to put their work up for free, so it’s up to them.

CB: Also that kind of method requires an already-existing base of followers that’s strong enough to support it.

AK: That’s right.

attack from space2 SPX: Laser Eyes & Fire Breath, Annie Koyama on Koyama Press

Attack From Space by Jon Vermilyea

CB: That’s something I feel Koyama Press has become. Someone enjoying work published by you will likely get some satisfaction out of other Koyama-published works.

AK: I’m hoping so, but it’s a pretty diverse catalog so I’m sure you won’t like every single book I do. But if you read Jesse Jacobs you might like something else [...] it’s not too much of a stretch to go to Renee French from Jessie. There are connections.

CB: I love that some publishers, behind their bigger name, just have one person picking the work. The same sort of thing happens with Eric Stephenson at Image Comics. Different scale, but the same idea.

Another thing mentioned at the panel was the vacuum left in the comics scene that was filled by you and other micro-publishers. What would you say your relationship is with the rest of the comics industry?

AK: I think that in our alternative part [of the comics industry], it’s so small that we are, whether you like it or not, in the same boat. For the record, I don’t consider Koyama a micro-publisher anymore. When you have a large distributor and you’re doing a certain number of titles and paying out [to artists] in the traditional way [...] these things make you not “micro” anymore. I’m sure my runs are a lot higher the other people at the panel. But yeah, I think we’re in the same boat together – I love all the other micro-publishers, I think more people should sprout up and do it as long as they know they’re doing it for love mostly and not for money. There’s room for more people to do what they love – don’t wait for a publisher to ask. There’s just not enough of us to publish all the great work I see out there.

Annie Koyama is the Publisher at Koyama Press. She kicks ass, takes names, and publishes 10 amazing books every year. It was an honor and delight to sit down and chat with her at SPX this year.

 

annie mation SPX: Laser Eyes & Fire Breath, Annie Koyama on Koyama Press

Annie-mation by David Huyck.

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9. Infographic: the evolution of digital comics in the US

This infographic is also an ad for WEBTOONS, a portal short serialized digital comics that are native on mobile platforms. The site is run by NAVER, the Google of South Korea. Despite the proprietary nature there is still some interesting info on the graph including projected worldwide size of the digital comics market…no idea where that came from, but webtoons are an established entertainment format in South Korea, seemingly more than in the US.

naver webtoons infographic Infographic: the evolution of digital comics in the US

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10. Quinones, Knisley and Level cover Harbinger: Faith #0 variant

HAR FAITH ZERO COVER A QUINONES Quinones, Knisley and Level cover Harbinger: Faith #0 variant

HARBINGER: FAITH #0 – Cover A by Joe Quinones

In a world where complains about overly idealized heroines are common, Faith, a member of Valiant’s Harbinger teen superhero group is a nice break: a normal young woman who is learning to deal with her powers just like every other superbeing. And now she’s getting her own one shot by Joshua Dysart and Robert Gill, with variant covers by Joe Quinones, Lucy KNisley and Brian Level. Valiant continues to branch out with their superhero line — because it’s a more diverse world and comics market out there.

 

 

Valiant is proud to announce HARBINGER: FAITH #0 – a brand new one-shot exploration of Valiant’s high-flying teenage Renegade and Unity’s newest team member!

Coming in December from New York Times best-selling writer Joshua Dysart (Harbinger, Harbinger Wars) and rising star Robert Gill (Armor Hunters: Harbinger), start reading here to discover how Harbinger’s high-spirited teenage fangirl went from the heart and soul of Peter Stanchek’s teenage Renegades to the newest member of the world’s most elite super-team – UNITY!

As Faith recuperates from the events of Armor Hunters: Harbinger, jump on board and discover the complete, never-before-revealed tale of her origin – just as she steps into the limelight for a brand new story arc beginning in November’s UNITY #12!

Her first and only boyfriend to date is a little bit of a douche, her friends are all gone, and, after her insane adventure in Mexico City, Faith Hebert is feeling a little frustrated with the direction of her life. She’s just a normal super-powered young woman in an increasingly crazy world. Here’s the story of a true innocent and a kind heart in a hard world. From the comic shop of her youth to the moment she found out that she was actually light as feather, Zephyr is the western wind. Warm and kind, she blows across us all. 

“She may not be physically strong, or brilliantly tactical, but her emotional intelligence and psychological strength are unparalleled among the other Renegades,” writer Joshua Dysart told Multiversity Comics. “I think some part of her understands that her light is needed even more in a world where you can lose your friends and face down horrible swarming alien insects. I think she sees a dark and violent world all around her and instead of that corrupting her, it reinforces her. Again, there’s a hint of that in this issue, but it’s also about a question we all ask ourselves, where do we go from here?”

This is HARBINGER: FAITH #0! Featuring covers by all-star artists Joe Quinones (Wednesday Comics), Lucy Knisley (Harbinger #25), and Brian Level (Lazarus), be here this December as one of the most unique, most sincere super-heroines anywhere in comics today takes on her very first solo adventure!

And don’t miss UNITY #12 by New York Times best-selling writer Matt Kindt and red-hot artist CAFU – the FIRST ISSUE of an all-new story arc recruiting Faith into the ranks of Valiant’s unbreakable all-star superteam, just as they go toe-to-toe with a brand new threat known only as The United!

HAR FAITH ZERO COVER B KNISLEY Quinones, Knisley and Level cover Harbinger: Faith #0 variant

HARBINGER: FAITH #0 – Cover B by Lucy Knisley

HAR FAITH ZERO VARIANT LEVEL Quinones, Knisley and Level cover Harbinger: Faith #0 variant

HARBINGER: FAITH #0 – Variant Cover by Brian Level

UNITY 012 COVER LEVEL Quinones, Knisley and Level cover Harbinger: Faith #0 variant

UNITY #12 – Cover by Brian Level

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11. SPX was lovely, as usual

tumblr nbwpacuSET1qa5kkmo1 500 SPX was lovely, as usual
The indie comics world and The Beat are recovering from the yearly love in also known as the Small Press Expo. You can see lots of photos on the SPX tumblr including the above of the alt-weekly summit of (clockwise) Derf, Shannon Wheeler, Dan “Tom Tomorrow” Perkins, Charles Burns, Mimi Pond, Keith Knight, Jen Sorenson, Ben Katchor, Lynda Barry and Jules Feiffer. The pound for pound genius in that one photo could probably move the world, given a lever long enough. I’ll have fuller thoughts later, I hope, but in the meantime, the wedding/prom Saturday night was EPIC. I’d be surprised if the prom doesn’t become a regular thing. It was great to see Chris Oarr, who established so many of the great traditions of SPX, back again, and he was greatly impressed to see what the baby had grown to be. Lots of people sold lots of books, lots of love flowed every which way, and it was generally* awesome.

It was so awesome that I started a new sketchbook! I haven’t done one of those since 2002. So many great people to get in it.

There are more photos by Jody Culkin up at PW Comics World. Below, all the lovely badges.

LastSaturdayIntroductionspr SPX was lovely, as usual tumblr nbro5gzSVh1qa5kkmo4 1280 SPX was lovely, as usual
• I am aware that there were a few sad faces here and there. That wll be covered in a longer report.

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12. Chris Ware is serializing “The Last Saturday” in The Guardian

LastSaturdayIntroductionspr Chris Ware is serializing The Last Saturday in The Guardian

The Guardian is serializing a new Chris Ware comic, called The Last Saturday. If there was a contest to chose the most Chris Ware-like title for a new Chris Ware comic “The Last Saturday” would be near the top. According to the site:

A brand new graphic novella by the award-winning cartoonist Chris Ware, tracing the lives of six individuals from Sandy Port, Michigan, published in weekly episodes. A new instalment will appear on this page every Saturday.


Given the size and storytelling methods of Ware’s work, I found the next sentence just as revealing:

Viewing on mobile? Scroll down to the thumbnail image and use the red, touch-controlled viewfinder to navigate around the full strip


That’s right, beeyotch, they had to devise some kind of viewer just to read what you can hold in your hands in the newspaper.

Anyway this looks amazing, duh.

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13. What it actually looks like when men are sexualized — NSFW

 What it actually looks like when men are sexualized    NSFW

“But the men in comics are sexualized too!” they have whined since time began, copletely ignring how boob-windows, brokebacks, boob socks and more are not the same thing as a man with a good physique in a dynamic pose. Well courtesy of Sears (!????!!?!?) and the listing for a UNDER THE BED RESTRAINT GEAR here’s what it actually looks like when a male is sexualized, just for your information.

This restraint gear sounds very handy for travel, BTW.

Manline Under The Bed Restraint Gear includes 4 cuffs, 4 restraint straps and one connector strap. Restrains your partners arms and legs from the sides or bottom of the bed. Restraint strap quickly fits beneath any mattress with no hooks. Easy set-up on any mattress. Portable and great for travel.

 What it actually looks like when men are sexualized    NSFW

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14. Preview: Spider-Man meets Kamala Khan in AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #7

Amazing Spider Man 7 Cover Preview: Spider Man meets Kamala Khan in AMAZING SPIDER MAN #7Who would win, Spider-Man or Ms Marvel? We may find out when they meet for the first time in October’s AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #7. Will Spidey share tips on how to get home in time for dinner while saving the world? The meeting of Marvel’s seminal “hero with problem” and the modern day “superhero for the people” should be an interesting moment, as captured by Dan Slott, Christos Gage and Guiseppe Camuncoli. Although this is billed as a team-up, in comics tradition, maybe they will accidentally fight first. The issue also introduces Spider-UK, a mysterious character with unknown ties to the Spider-verse. We’d guess crumpets and cricket but that’s to be seen.

The issue includes variant covers by Javier Pulido, Gary Choo, and a Deadpool 75th variant by Michael Golden. There’s also a Hasbro variant which is…for bagged comics I guess?

Amazing Spider Man 7 Preview 1 Preview: Spider Man meets Kamala Khan in AMAZING SPIDER MAN #7 Amazing Spider Man 7 Preview 2 Preview: Spider Man meets Kamala Khan in AMAZING SPIDER MAN #7

Amazing Spider Man 7 Preview 3 Preview: Spider Man meets Kamala Khan in AMAZING SPIDER MAN #7

 

Amazing Spider Man 7 Preview 4 Preview: Spider Man meets Kamala Khan in AMAZING SPIDER MAN #7

 

Amazing Spider Man 7 Pulido Variant Preview: Spider Man meets Kamala Khan in AMAZING SPIDER MAN #7 Amazing Spider Man 7 Hasbro Variant Preview: Spider Man meets Kamala Khan in AMAZING SPIDER MAN #7 Amazing Spider Man 7 Golden Deadpool 75th Variant Preview: Spider Man meets Kamala Khan in AMAZING SPIDER MAN #7 Amazing Spider Man 7 Choo Variant Preview: Spider Man meets Kamala Khan in AMAZING SPIDER MAN #7

 

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15. The Retailer’s View: Eventful

In August, I went on vacation with my girlfriend (who is now my fiancée) and took some well deserved time away from the store and the world of comics in general. Being Mr. Manager for a shop and writing about comics on the internet doesn’t allow for a lot of extracurriculars, so stepping away for three weeks was a welcome change.

When I returned to the store a week ago, I was met with the sight of the first week’s worth of Future’s End books spilling from the shelves, and almost a longbox of The Death of Wolverine sitting in a box as overstock. Immediately, I felt my heart tighten. This sensation was exacerbated when the first customer of the day walked through the door, grabbed a handful of each lenticular and foil embossed cover and inquired as to what the investment value of the books would be. I smiled even as my veins filled with poison, and I told them what I tell everybody: if there was a science to making money off of comics, I would be a far richer man than the one you see today.

046.DCC .BstrGl.1.0 384x591 5390e24a6b24d7.98673751 194x300 The Retailers View: Eventful

SUDDENLY TIGERS

Let’s take a few steps back and give a little context for Future’s End and The Death of Wolverine. Given the fact that you’re reading an article about comic book retail on the internet, it’s probably safe to say you know the basics, so we’ll skip past the bits about the how’s and why’s of both series and go knee deep into the retail bits.

As detailed in my first column for this site, DC’s methods for this year’s round of lenticular covers were informed by last year’s madness. In an effort to bypass issues with supply not meeting demand, the company asked that retailers submit their final orders for the books at the end of May. For normal comics, the final order cut off for a book usually arrives three-and-a-half weeks before said issue will hit the shelves, allowing retailers to adjust numbers using relatively current data. Placing orders at the end of May meant extrapolating demand using a set of data that would be better utilized for books shipping in late June or July, which made things hard to balance. On top of that, there were a heap of other troubling things to deal with, such as:

  • Finding a balance between last year’s artificially high demand and this year’s guaranteed supply.
  • Guessing how the line would tie into the weekly shipping Future’s End series, and how that would or would not effect certain books in the line.
  • Trying to set numbers for titles that had yet to debut, such as Grayson.
  • Dealing with the late announcement of the creative teams for each title, and attempting to inform readers about the books that would and would not feature the book’s regular team.
  • Guessing what other retailers within driving distance would order and how it would effect short and long term demand.
  • Discovering some kind of alchemy that would tell me which customers would leave and arrive in the course of a quarter of the year, including the crap chute of “how many students from the nearby university will want to open up files and/or grab comics”.
  • Guessing whether or not the Booster Gold issue was the start of a new ongoing or mini-series or just a one shot.

All of this while dealing with the more regular considerations such as trending audience interest, spending budgets, and oh yeah, placing initial orders for books that were going to start shipping in July, which were solicited alongside them, and due on the same day.

The fact that I have yet to sell out of any of the new lenticular books is a minor miracle, especially considering the fact that I placed my bet on these covers selling only slightly better than the books would sell during a regular month. On the other hand, there are more than a few that I splurged on that didn’t quite ignite interest. Will I sell them all? Probably. The covers are still quite the draw, and will probably turn over regularly in the back issue bins – but for more than a few books, it will take more time than usual to turn my orders into a profit. Luckily, I’m running the kind of store that can weather a line of books taking a bit longer to sell than usual. I shudder to think what would happen to a store who couldn’t easily absorb such a stock. Even if they push through, their purchasing power for the upcoming Christmas season will be severely truncated, causing an ever expanding ripple effect due to a couple of bad hunches.

Death of Wolverine 3 Cover 198x300 The Retailers View: Eventful

Now, on the other side of things, there’s The Death of Wolverine. Instead of matching DC pound for pound with a bit of line-wide craziness, Marvel opted for the safer track: one big bet on one big event. The comparative risk between the two ventures couldn’t be more different. Over at DC, their event is a gamble that involves almost their entire regular superhero line. Over at Marvel, it’s a gamble that involves the death ($) of one of their most recognizable characters ($$). A decent order was going to be placed on the title regardless, but there were a few things that made this pill a little harder to swallow than most:

  • Marvel was going to ship the book weekly, which meant that proper order adjustments were going to be nearly impossible under the best of conditions.
  • The company was not soliciting the book under the best of conditions – which in this case meant all four issues were solicited early, and with a final order cut off date of July 14th – whole seven and a half weeks before the first issue would hit the stands.
  • The first issue carried with it no less than eight different variants, all requiring different order thresholds to hit – a logistical nightmare.

In the interim, the company didn’t make things any easier. In between the solicitation copy hitting the publication and final orders coming due, they dribbled out several changes to the line up, including foil embossed covers (only the first issue was going to carry that “feature”), along with a price jump “order what you want” Canadian variants (which feature the same covers as the original books with photoshopped CANADIAN features like our flag and the word “CANADA”) and a smattering of more qualified variants. Does your head ache yet? Oh, just you wait.

Death of Wolverine 3 Canada Variant 197x300 The Retailers View: Eventful

Ohhhhh, Canada.

Two of the variants on tap for issue one – the “Deadpool” and “Skottie Young” covers – required retailers to match All New X-Men #25 orders at 250% if they wanted to get them in. While I generally dislike all variant covers, qualifications like this always grind my gears. First, a retailer has to take a look at their numbers, and determine if this is a smart thing to do. Now, in this instance, All New X-Men #25 was a book that sold an estimated 63,827 copies, so for simplicities sake, let’s say there is a shop out there that ordered 64 copies of that book. Forgetting whether or not they sold through that many copies (because it doesn’t matter to Marvel or Diamond), that means they would have to order at least 160 copies to even qualify to get those covers. Will the money you bring in grabbing all of those extra copies match the money those special covers bring in?

Bonus questions: say you decide against beefing up your numbers. How many customers will you lose out on because they were looking for that specific cover? How many of those customers would have bought more than one copy of The Death of Wolverine? How many would have bought the whole run from you, but are now going to do so elsewhere? How many would have eventually set up a file at your shop? These are all crazy questions, but every retailer has them swirling in their head when they place these orders – and I haven’t even gotten to the really crazy parts yet.

In addition to the 250% covers, Marvel offered variants ranging from “1 for every 50” copies ordered, all the way to “1 for every 500” copies, so even if you could make those 250% numbers work with relative ease, they teased you with something even more unattainable. Dare you go for broke and claw up to 500 copies for your store? If you sell it, and a few of the other variants, will it offset the cost of unsold copies? Even if you attempt to stretch your fingers for this goal, and even if you sell those variants… is it really worth it in the long run? Couldn’t money spent on 500 copies of Wolverine – many of which will end up being remaindered somehow – be put to better use by bringing in a wider range of products? But again, if you don’t try and get that cherry variant, will you be losing out on big money? Can you really afford not to?

The final knife in Marvel’s game to sell a ton of this book came in the form of some bonus ordering incentives. This bit will be easier to show you as a picture than anything else. For issue one and four:

dow2 300x72 The Retailers View: Eventful

click to embiggen

And for issues two and three:

dow 300x72 The Retailers View: Eventful

click to embiggen

On the surface, it appears as though they’re helping you out. Want to try and get those crazy variants? We’ve made it a little easier on your wallet, champ. Congrats. Go nuts. Reality happens to be a bit darker than that though. As always, Marvel could give a crap about whether or not you’re selling their books. All they want to do is make sure you’re buying their books. You could purchase 500 copies and set fire to them all for all they care – once they have your money, they’re good.

Now full disclosure: my chain went for the gusto and ordered 500 copies. We took a look at all of the information at our hands, looked at what the books were going to cost us with Marvel’s extra discounts added to the mix, and worked out a system where the numbers worked for us. Given my own personal druthers, I would have gone more in the direction of one of Aaron Sorkin’s TV shows and make the principled stand. I would have ordered something that matched reader demand more than collector demand, but I manage a store that was built and funded by other hands, and at times, I end up serving other interests. I end up walking into the store and seeing a longbox worth of comics sitting in overstock. I also end up seeing a guy spend enough money on a small handful of the variants to offset our cost for the entire set of 500, so it all balances out, I guess. Where was I going with this? Ah yes.

Imagine you’re a retailer. What do you want to order? This goes for both events, by the way, DC’s Future’s End and Marvel’s Death of Wolverine. How do you place your orders? What things do you want to keep in the front of your mind? Do you want to expend the extra effort it takes to put together orders for an entire line of lenticular covers months in advance, or do you opt for the simple solution of ordering what you’d normally order? Do you become bothered by the idea that if you just do regular numbers, collectors might raid your supply and you won’t be left with enough copies to satisfy those who pop into your store every week and grab comics from the shelves? Do you bother adjusting your numbers in order to get variant editions, or do you just let things lie? Will you allow the promise of big money balloon your orders up? Do you make that gamble?

These are the questions that plague a retailer’s mind when they set about ordering your comics month in and month out. Not only are they dealing with variants and odd shipping schedules and order thresholds, but they’re doing so for hundreds of titles each and every month. Not all of them require the same amount of thought, but they all require a modicum of consideration – especially when you have to make sure you order within a budget. You can’t just do all the math for determining orders for an event book and call it a day, you have to consider what that order will do to the rest of your budget. You have to keep things on track so that they don’t spiral out of control – because while there isn’t a science to making money on comics, there’s a surefire way to lose it all: getting lost chasing big money instead of focusing on the actual money you have to spend.

11 Comments on The Retailer’s View: Eventful, last added: 9/16/2014
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16. Review: Teen Titans: Earth One, Volume 1

 Review: Teen Titans: Earth One, Volume 1

by Jeff Lemire, Rachel Dodson, Terry Dodson
On Sale Date: November 25, 2014
9781401245566, 1401245560
$22.99 USD / $26.99 CAD
Hardcover 144 pages
Comics & Graphic Novels / Superheroes
— — —

Once again, DC Comics reinvents a major franchise as part of their “Earth One” series of original graphic novel series.

This time, it’s Teen Titans.

Superheroes don’t exist in this DC series (which stands-alone from other “Earth One” series).  So how do you re-create a team of super-heroes which were originally teen versions of the Justice League?

You take a bit of X-Files, mix in some Superman mythology, then borrow from DC’s rich history of secret laboratories and genetic engineering, add a few tropes from Runaways, and give it a “real world” setting.

So we see the genesis (literally and mythologically) of Terra, Cyborg, Beast Boy, Raven, Starfire, Tempest, and Jericho in this volume.

As with Marvel’s Ultimate Universe, this volume borrows from the mainstream DC Universe, sometimes heavily, sometimes with a throwaway reference (like a soldier named “Trainor”).

The origin story uncovers mysteries, and teases more to come.  (Raven is the nexus of the group, linking to TEN other individuals, according to the visions perceived by her Navajo grandfather.)

Fans of the previous Teen Titans comics will find lots of interesting tangents from well-known characters.  Those who know the mythology of DC will have lots to contemplate, as much is implied and explicated.

 Review: Teen Titans: Earth One, Volume 1Neophyte readers will easily understand the characters, their secret history, and the unknowns they face.  While I read a review copy via Adobe Digital Editions with somewhat jaggy art,  Terry and Rachel Dodson’s art is very clean and dynamic.  A variety of panels and layouts are used, but do not deviate from the traditional left-right grid.  The eye flows easily from one panel to the next.

The only objectionable part of the story?  Perhaps the teens smoking tobacco.

I’ll recommend this for middle school readers, on up to those who enjoy a good meaty superhero tale.  I’m intrigued to discover more (especially who the diamond totem on the cave refers to…)!

Here’s hoping DC keeps to an annual schedule of publishing future volumes.  (148 pages equates to about six months of comic book art work.)

Meanwhile, while we wait, there are additional Superman and Batman volumes scheduled, and Grant Morrison is adapting Wonder Woman with Yanick Paquette.

Myself, I look forward to the day when each month offers a new “Earth One” volume!

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17. 2014 Ignatz Award Winners IN FULL

agnatz2 2014 Ignatz Award Winners IN FULLWe’re live blogging the 2014 18th Annual Ignatz Awards—there’s a palpable buzz in the air as not only the traditional agentry of the awards un rolls, but additional pageantry in the shape of a wedding and a prom are on tap. As a reminder, the Ignatzes are perhaps the ONLY awards in any medium where people race back from dinner just so they can attend! The secret? brevity and a chocolate fountain!

And with no further ado, let’s get to it. Warren Bernard started out thanking the alt.weekly crew, including Jules Feiffer, Lynda Barry and Charles Burns. Mike Thomas is our mc and will be officiating at the Hanselmann wedding.

IN 20145 the dates will be Sept. 18-19, and it will be a 21st Century focus with Michael DeForge, Matt Bors, Lilli Carre and Luke Pearson. In 215 will be choosing and with Bill K will be curating show at the Society of Illustrators dedicated to Alt.weekly cartoonists. The SOI has joined up with SPX! and what else can happen. Lynda Barry Ellen Forney, Millionaire, Knight, Sorenson, Derf and more will be in the show, the show will open in early March. BE THERE.

Sturm says there are the two reasons that the Ignatzes are the best awards; it’s the shortest and the coolest award—a brick.

IF we are in the glden age of comics, then all the cartoonists in this room are the gold,” says Sturm to an awwwwwww. And then I said…awwwwwww. “As an idle remember of this tribe I can tell you from experience it doesn’t get any easier, but that is why tonight is a night we revel. It’s important to take a break from our drawing boards and tablets to celebrate our accomplishments.”

Fabulous Sasha Steinberg Velour is out to present Outstanding Story to Meredith gran. “Comcis is the most fun thing I can imagine doing, I wake up thinking about them and go go bed thinking about them I can’t think of anything I want to do more.”

Chuck Forsman came out to Present outstanding Anthology to Qu33F edited by Robert Kirby. The Next presenter is is Alec Longstreth who presents Best Series to Jason Shiga who delivers an amusing speech plugging his Patreon campaign. GIVE TO JASON SHIGA. AND THE BEAT!

Sasha has taken over as host and delivers some fierce intros.

Brandon Graham presents Promising New Talent to Cathy G. Johnson. “I love coifs it’s a very imprint medium to me, I love this culture and this community that we’ve cerated I feel very welcome in it. It can also be frustrating. I feel like this year and many years in the past a lot of our peers have experienced harassment, esp. female peers and I think we need o work harder to reject this,” PREACH IT SISTER!

Eleanor Davis says it’s great that everyone loves comics even though it strange that we all fell in love with it. But the nominees ensure that people will keep falling in love with comics. And the inner is Sam Alden who says merely Thank You. Aisha Franz from Germany present Best Minicomics to Sophie Goldstein, who thanks her teachers at CCS, a class of 2013 grad. A very strong year, it turns out. Sophie Yanow presents Outstanding ONline Comic to EVan Dahm a very popular winner. “This show is important to me, comics are my life so thanks for liking it.”

Paul Karasik presents Outstanding Graphic Novel. Karasik urges everyone to go around and find someone who is not busy and buying something from them. “I found some very storage things today for $3 so that’s your assignment.” He presents best Graphic Novel to Jillian Tamaki for This One summer. Finally John Porcellino come sour to give Outstanding Artist to Sam Bosma. Hey I voted for him! AND now, let’s have a wedding! And let’s all give all our love to COMICS!

Outstanding Story
*“Brownout Biscuit” (from Octopus Pie): Dead Forever, by Meredith Gran
“Destination X,” by Jon Martz
“The Grassy Knoll,” by Nick Drnaso
“Jobs,” Life Zone, by Simon Hanselmann
“Mom,” Viewotron #2, by Sam Sharpe

Outstanding Anthology or Collection
Amazing Facts and Beyond, by Kevin Huizenga and Dan Zettwoch
The End, by Anders Nilsen
Eye of the Majestic Creature (Vol. 2), by Leslie Stein
*QU33R, edited by Robert Kirby
Sock Monkey Treasury, by Tony Millionaire

Outstanding Series
The Black Feather Falls, Ellen Lindner
*Demon, by Jason Shiga
Powdered Milk, by Keiler Roberts
Sky in Stereo, by Sacha Mardou
Towerkind, by Kat Verhoeven

Promising New Talent
Luke Howard — Trevor
*Cathy G. Johnson – Jeremiah; Boy Genius; Until It Runs Clear
Nick Offerman — Orange; Onions
Keiler Roberts — Powdered Milk (series)
Daryl Seitchik — Missy

Outstanding Comic
Blammo #8, by Noah Van Sciver
Cosplayers, by Dash Shaw
It Will All Hurt #2, by Farel Dalrymple
Misliving Amended, by Adam Buttrick
*Wicked Chicken Queen, by Sam Alden

Outstanding Minicomic
The Grassy Knoll, by Nick Drnaso
*House of Women, by Sophie Goldstein
Never Forgets, by Yumi Sakugawa
Test Tube #1, by Carlos Gonzales
Up to the Top, by Ian Sampson

Outstanding Online Comic
Band for Life, Anya Davidson
Big Dogs at Nite, Dane Martin
Demon, Jason Shiga
On Hiatus, Pete Toms
*Vattu, Evan Dahm

Outstanding Graphic Novel
The Amazing, Enlightening and Absolutely True Adventures of Katherine Whaley, by Kim Deitch
The Boxer, Reinhard Kleist
Boxers & Saints, by Gene Luen Yang
*This One Summer, by Jillian Tamaki and Mariko Tamaki
War of Streets and Houses, Sophie Yanow

Outstanding Artist*Sam Bosma — Fantasy Basketball
Kim Deitch — The Amazing, Enlightening and Absolutely True Adventures of Katherine Whaley
Sophie Goldstein — Darwin Carmichael Is Going to Hell; Edna II; House of Women
Ed Piskor — Hip Hop Family Tree (Vol. 1)
Jesse Reklaw — Coach Tag

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18. CCS offers the The Applied Cartooning Manifesto at SPX

001 Manifesto CCS offers the The Applied Cartooning Manifesto at SPX
I just arrived at SPX and the thrill of excitement over comics is a palpable thing, as the young and the young at heart (Saw Jules Feiffer walking around) gather to talk about what they love. but making a living at what you love remains a blithely ignored question mark (at best) or a looming storm cloud that colors everything (at worst.) Addressing this, James Sturm who runs the Center for Cartoon Studies, and Marek Bennett will have free copies of The World is Made of Cheese, The Applied Cartooning Manifesto at the show. The entire PDF will be available for download this Sunday,  but stop by the CCS booth to get your own copy. Sturm writes:
[T]his conversation about making ends meet as a cartoonist has always been around (and something that I’ve explored before, re: Market Day) and seems to be on the forefront of people’s minds. At SPX, with SO many cartoonists around, it will certainly be an undercurrent. So this pamphlet is a part of that conversation.
And here’s a preview of what everyone will be talking about. 003 Manifesto CCS offers the The Applied Cartooning Manifesto at SPX 004 Manifesto CCS offers the The Applied Cartooning Manifesto at SPX
005 Manifesto CCS offers the The Applied Cartooning Manifesto at SPX 006 Manifesto CCS offers the The Applied Cartooning Manifesto at SPX 007 Manifesto CCS offers the The Applied Cartooning Manifesto at SPX

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19. Free Comic Book Day Promotes ‘Alien’ Metal Dildo Doubling as a Bottle Opener

I think the money makers at Diamond Select Toys are secretly testing the market for an upcoming adult toy line.

The Free Comic Book Day Facebook page posted a typical a nerd baiting question with no possible answer: who would win in fight between Spider-Man’s most popular nemesis Venom or the cult classic 80’s extraterrestrial nightmare Xenomorph? Of course this wasn’t a sponsored post to promote Diamond Select Toys wide variety bottle openers, but it sure as hell looks like it. The comments are full of well informed, substantial arguments on who would come on top. But some Facebook users couldn’t help to mention the fact that the Xenomorph opener bares a striking resemblance of a penis.

alienvsvenom Free Comic Book Day Promotes Alien Metal Dildo Doubling as a Bottle Opener

How could Venom fare against Xenomorph’s veiny, long shaft and bulbous mushroom tip? I couldn’t image using this cold metal bottle opener bringing any kind of pleasure aside from opening a cold brewski, but the people of the Internet will find a way. Nonetheless, you can’t but help but appreciate the H. R. Giger work on the Alien series. Diamond Select Toys would like to remind you that Christmas is around the corner, and this would make a good stocking stuffer. Talk about gag gifts. *This was not a sponsored post by Diamond Select Toys.*

alienopener Free Comic Book Day Promotes Alien Metal Dildo Doubling as a Bottle Opener

5 Comments on Free Comic Book Day Promotes ‘Alien’ Metal Dildo Doubling as a Bottle Opener, last added: 9/15/2014
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20. SPX 2014 Debuts: a few choice picks

In the olden days I would slave away all night putting up pictures of debuts, but now all CAFs do it on their website, and here’s the amazing SPX 2014 Debut Books page! BRING MONEY.

But if you want some recommendations, Rob CLough has an essential list of seventeen creators to check out. I can’t improve on Rob’s list or taste, but I DID pick out a few books that caught my fancy. I’ll have two categories here, BIG BOX BOOKS from major publishers, and SMALLER DELIGHTS.

[note I'm uploading these on a bus and will add more copy when I get working wifi. ]

BIG BOX BOOKS

IMG 9403 SPX 2014 Debuts: a few choice picks

IMG 9409 SPX 2014 Debuts: a few choice picks

IMG 9400 SPX 2014 Debuts: a few choice picks

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IMG 9414 SPX 2014 Debuts: a few choice picks

IMG 9409 0 SPX 2014 Debuts: a few choice picks

IMG 9426 SPX 2014 Debuts: a few choice picks

SMALLER DELIGHTS

IMG 9402 SPX 2014 Debuts: a few choice picks

IMG 9407 SPX 2014 Debuts: a few choice picks

IMG 9404 SPX 2014 Debuts: a few choice picks

IMG 9412 SPX 2014 Debuts: a few choice picks

IMG 9415 SPX 2014 Debuts: a few choice picks

IMG 9416 SPX 2014 Debuts: a few choice picks

IMG 9417 SPX 2014 Debuts: a few choice picks

IMG 9416 0 SPX 2014 Debuts: a few choice picks

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21. SPX ’14 party poop: this is the year of the Prom and the Wedding

tumblr nbie1eMyE41qiccgro1 1280 SPX 14 party poop:  this is the year of the Prom and the WeddingThis weekend the Small Press Expo takes place in North Bethesda, MD. The show is known for its collegial, summer camp vibe, but this year, it is going ALL OUT. There will never again be talk about the pig roast or the softball game or the karaoke or anything else, because this year there is going to be a PROM.

Yes following the Ignatzes there will be a danceathon in prom finery as we dance around the chocolate fountain in glee. This kind of display has been bubbling under in private parties for years but this year, it’s real. In case you’re worried about etiquette, the SPX tumblr has the rulez.

There is also going to be a post Ignatz WEDDING, according to Simon Hanselmann:

What is this wedding you’re doing?

I was joking about having a fake wedding, and then Cohen at Fantagraphics got really excited about it and said, “We’ll do it, it’ll be real.” It’s a publicity stunt, basically. I’m going to buy a wedding dress. Grant and I have to get drunk and go to the wedding dress strip and buy a wedding dress. I’m worried about how much it’s going to cost. It’s a fake wedding; DeForge is my best man. It was going to be officiated by Gary Groth, but I think Chris Mautner is doing it now, from Comic Book Resources. There’s going to be cake, balloons, I’m getting married to comics. It’s going to be a beautiful, emotional, symbolic kind of tribute to my love of the craft. I’m kind of nervous about it now, because I kind of have to write it, like it’s a comedy bit in a way. And it’s very heartfelt in a way. I’m kind of a bit crazy. It will have meaning to me, but it’s just kind of a lark as well. I’m going to do a talk at Parsons, I’ve got my list of all the stuff I have to do, I’m going to do Gridlords.

Will this surpass the time Nick Gurewitch talked to a gorilla? Very possibly.

Anyway, it looks like this will be a Saturday night SPX hoedown that people will be talking about for days, even weeks to come. Word on the street is that there will be Tumblr posts about it and possibly even tweets.

My only regret is that due to luggage restraints, I won’t be able to bring a hat. =( Oh well, best to leave that kind of thing to the kids, anyway.

Oh yeah Flashback Friday, here’s Eric Reynolds and Chris Oarr, then SPX director, from 2003 at the OLD hotel. I hear Oarr will be making an appearance for this 20th Anniversary show. Truly this one has it all.

154 5486 SPX 14 party poop:  this is the year of the Prom and the Wedding

3 Comments on SPX ’14 party poop: this is the year of the Prom and the Wedding, last added: 9/12/2014
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22. Prometheus #1 Doesn’t Ask The Big Questions

23594 Prometheus #1 Doesnt Ask The Big Questions

By Matthew Jent

Prometheus: Fire and Stone #1

Script: Paul Tobin

Art: Juan Ferreyra

Letters: Nate Piekos of Blambot

Cover: David Palumbo

Variant Cover: Paul Pope, with colors by Shay M. Plummer

Genre: Sci-Fi/Movie Tie-In

 

Last year, Dark Horse announced they were rebooting their licensed Aliens and Predator comics, launching the first Prometheus series, and tying them all together in a shared universe. That shared universe has arrived with Prometheus: Fire and Stone #1, to be followed by three more Fire and Stone series for Aliens, Predators, and Aliens vs. Predator, respectively. Each series will run four issues, and will conclude with a single, double-sized wrap-up issue.

Reaction to the Prometheus film was divided. It stands at 73% fresh on Rotten Tomatoes, which is a little surprising. Most folks I’ve talked to personally hated the movie, especially fans of the Alien series. But for me, it was a return to form for the series (and universe) launched by Ridley Scott’s initial Alien film in 1979. Prometheus, the film, had retro space suits paired with modern moviemaking sensibilities, themes of cosmic dread and cosmic creation, and questions about where are we going and where we have been. It was majestic and daring science-fiction, populated with compelling characters.

I loved the movie, and I was ready for more.

Prometheus, the comic book, captures the look of its motion picture predecessor, but the first issue isn’t clear about what questions this story is asking. The film wondered where humanity came from, and how its characters  would react to the answer. Fire and Stone introduces a new ship (the Helios) and a new crew (including salvagers, documentarians, and an android) who are en route to Moon LV-223, the setting for Prometheus the film. Most of the crew thinks they’re looking for a crashed ship, which the reader knows is the Prometheus of the title. Angela Foster, the Helios’s captain, knows that Peter Weyland himself was aboard Prometheus, and presumably died on LV-223 seeking Engineers, who he believed were the creators of mankind. Angela wants to complete Weyland’s mission.

But why? Captain Foster announces her intention to find answers to one of the many cameras aboard the Helios, but we don’t know why it matters to her. It’s true that Fire and Stone is simply the first issue of not only a four-part series, but also of an entire line of shared-continuity books, but in the first act of Prometheus the film, we understood that Elizabeth Shaw, played by Noomi Rapace, had a belief in God that was sometimes in opposition to her scientific beliefs. Meredith Vickers, played by Charlize Theron, was a Weyland Corporation representative there to enforce the rules even as she clashed with David, Michael Fassbender’s android, who chased after human affectations and modeled his speech patterns after Peter O’Toole’s Lawrence of Arabia.

In contrast, Fire and Stone’s characters sometimes reveal bits of backstory — the captain keeps her true purpose on LV-223 a secret, the astrobiologist has a mysterious illness, the documentarian is romantically involved with a member of the crew — but there are no compelling character moments in this issue. Even if Captain Foster’s job is to simply complete Peter Weyland’s mission, an implied “me too!” is not a very compelling character motivation.

But at least in the absence of rich characters worth investing in, Fire and Stone offers an interesting plot. After a one-page prologue set in the time period of the film, the comic jumps ahead to the year 2219, roughly 130 years after the Prometheus the film and about 40 years after the events of Aliens and Alien³. When the salvage crew of the Helios lands on LV-223 — though there is some uncertainty on their part if they’ve landed on the right moon  — they find a world that has been irrevocably changed by the events of the film. It’s different from the LV-223 we’ve seen before, but it’s still recognizable as existing in the Aliens universe. The Helios crew explores with even less care than their Prometheus counterparts, which will surely enrage the same segment of the audience who thought the Prometheus crew were crazy for taking their helmets off, breathable atmosphere or no. But this seems consistent with the Weyland-Yutani protocols (or lack thereof) for exploring new worlds that we’ve seen in the films. The characters make bad decisions, which leads to dangerous situations, which is another hallmark of stories set in an Alien universe.

Juan Ferreyra’s art is another high mark for the book. There are a lot of Helios crewmembers introduced in just a few pages, and their depictions remain clear and consistent throughout. The illustration and coloring styles (and the spacesuits) remind me of European sci-fi comics in the vein of Métal Hurlant. The colors in particular are crisp and bright, which is something I’ve come to expect from recent Dark Horse books. Once the Helios lands and the crew leaves the ship, the book reveals LV-223 mostly through two-page spreads, breaking away from the single-page claustrophobia of the scenes set on the ship, an effective way to pull the reader’s attention across the expanse of a strange and unexplored world.

Paul Tobin is the only credited writer in the advance review copy I received, but much of the press for this shared universe reboot talks about the “writers room” approach to all of the books. Tobin is joined by Chris Roberson on Aliens, Joshua Williamson on Predators, Chris Sebela on Aliens vs. Predator, and Kelly Sue DeConnick on the crossover finale issue, and as the group’s lead writer. Tobin’s Prometheus is designed to be “the warm, beating heart of all of these books,” according to AvP’s Sebela in an October 2013 interview with io9. Which might be true, but in addition to jumping the Prometheus story into the timeframe of the Alien films, the tone and atmosphere of this issue is much closer to stories about xenomorphs than the one we’ve seen about Engineers. “Why are we here?” is replaced with “Get out of there fast!” as the “beating heart” of this story’s engine.

That could be great news if you loved the Alien quartet of films and were disappointed in Prometheus’s ties to the series. But for anyone looking forward to Prometheus, the comic, carrying on the spirit of Prometheus, the film, it’s a disappointment.

5 Comments on Prometheus #1 Doesn’t Ask The Big Questions, last added: 9/12/2014
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23. Annihilator #1: Where the Personal Meets the Weird

ann 01 cov promo lr 1600x1068 Annihilator #1: Where the Personal Meets the Weird

By Matthew Jent

Annihilator #1

Writer: Grant Morrison

Illustrator: Frazer Irving

Letterer: Jared K. Fletcher

Book & Logo Designer: John J. Hill

Genre: Sci-Fi/Horror

 

“Get this black mass on the floor.”

Annihilator begins with a black hole, but the thrust of its story concerns Ray Spass (pronounced space, as in outer), a screenwriter whose big hits are a few years behind him. He still gets “paid to be weird,” but nearly everyone he meets — his new landlord, his agent, the FBI — is gently prodding him to produce something now, something new.

But like a ray of light trapped by a black hole’s gravity well, Ray’s creative process is slow and stuck. He keeps turning in rough act ones to his agent, unable to get any closer to what his story is really about.

So Ray does what anyone would do. He moves into a haunted house.

Well, maybe. Ray’s not the most reliable point of view character, so those voices, those fleeting glimpses of figures and boots and hands reaching out from the dark? They might be real, they might be ghosts, or they might be his own imagination running away with him.

Hey, I like it when Morrison writes about the Justice League. But I’d much rather spend time in a world like this, where the personal meets the weird. That’s what Morrison does best.

Ray’s screenplay-in-progress, also called “Annihilator,” is about Max Nomax, a prisoner on the edge of a black hole seeking “the cure for death.”  Ray’s girlfriend has left him (or died, or disappeared), and Ray writes his own emotional wasteland into the screenplay. When Max meets Baby Bug-Eyes, a walking, talking teddy bear and “artificial emotional companion,” he kicks him across the room.

Ray is writing a story about being trapped at the edge of a black hole from a house with a growing sinkhole in the yard. Ray thinks of himself as Samuel Taylor Coleridge, writing his own unfinished Kubla Khan. Ray’s work is interrupted by a party of prostitutes he’s invited over himself, creating his own obstacles to prevent his self-perceived work of genius from being completed. Because it can still potentially be a great work of art if it’s never properly finished, right?

The meta-masterstroke for this six-issue series would be to release everything but the final issue, freezing it in time. We’ve all heard about Dickens’s The Mystery of Edwin Drood, Gilliam’s Don Quixote, Moore and Sienkiewicz’s Big Numbers — unfinished projects with so much potential for greatness they have their own gravity. But part of their mythology is that they remain undone. They don’t have to stand up to the same kind of critique as finished projects, because their endings live in our imaginations.

Frazer Irving’s art is reminiscent of 90s Vertigo comics, but without the muddy rushwork that could populate some of those monthly books. Ray is drawn as moody and darkly attractive, with a tuft of black curls erupting from one quarter of his otherwise shaved head. The art loops and curves, drawing the eye, possessing a gravity of its own. Sometimes it’s like looking through a distorted peephole or an iPhone panorama picture. Sometimes it’s like being on a rail or a rollercoaster that pulls you along. Sometimes it’s like a shifting floor, using your own sense of balance to push you in the direction you should go.

Irving’s style is a nice mashup of some of Bernie Wrightson, ghost-bear-style Bill Sienkiewicz, and Jim Starlin at his cosmically most alluring, especially when Max Nomax flashes his spooky smile. Even without Morrison’s big ideas, that’s a visual space opera I would sign up for. With Morrison, I’m trusting that Annihilator is going to get even weirder, and I’m excited to see what Irving can do.

Sinkholes. Black holes. A black mass. This is Morrison’s best, most confident book in years.

Maybe the “cure for death” sought by Max Nomax is actually an eternal pause button, becoming frozen in space and time, at least to the perspective of an outside observer. We see the light slowing down, but to the light itself? It crosses over that point of no return. Do you want to be frozen, or do you want to see what’s on the other side?

The light knows things we do not.

3 Comments on Annihilator #1: Where the Personal Meets the Weird, last added: 9/15/2014
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24. Z2 Comics announces Henni by Miss Lasko-Gross for 2015

Henni cover 06 Z2 Comics announces Henni by Miss Lasko Gross for 2015

Miss Lasko-Gross has gained attention for her two autobiographical comics, Escape from Special and A Mess of Everything, but her new book will be more of a fable. Henni is the tale of a young girl named Henni who lives in a structured society where religion is the last word of the law. She goes off on her own to discover truth and adventure. The story is drawn in s style reminiscent of classic children’s books, contrasting carefree childhood with the struggle against dogma.

Lasko-Gross will be at SX this wekeend with an 8-page preview. In the meantime,  here’s a look at some pages. Henni will be out in January 2015.

Z2 Comics, which is run by Josh Frankel, previously published Paul Pope’s Escapo and Dean Haspiel’s Fear my Dear.

henni 000a Web Z2 Comics announces Henni by Miss Lasko Gross for 2015 henni 000b web Z2 Comics announces Henni by Miss Lasko Gross for 2015 Henni 001 Web Z2 Comics announces Henni by Miss Lasko Gross for 2015

 

 

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25. Long Beach Comic Con Programming begins roll-out

LBCC Logo Long Beach Comic Con Programming begins roll out

The convention season never stops, and West Coasters will be enjoying the sights and sounds of the Long Beach Comic Con on September 27-28th at the Long Beach Convention Center. Now in its sixth year, LBCC has found a spot for itself as a comics focused show on a seaside setting. You can check out the eclectic line-up of  guests of honor in the PR below, and the programming is beginning to be announced, with two panels that regular Beat readers will probably enjoy, focusing on banned books and YA graphic novels.

Saturday the 27th at 2 PM room 103C

Forbidden Knowledge: Banned Books Week Event

Literature was the first form of entertainment and education passed down through the generations. Sometimes the books that have given so much to so many need protecting. Find out how you can help make sure the books you love will always be available to new readers. Joshua Hale Fialkov (THE BUNKER; THE LIFE AFTER) and SALON contributor and novelist Samuel Sattin (THE LEAGUE OF SOMEBODIES) will talk with moderator Alan Kesinger
Sunday the 28th at 3 PM Room 103A/B

YA Riot: Stories for a Young Adult Audience
Join best-selling YA novelists Leigh Bardugo, Cecil Castellucci, Melissa de la Cruz, Michael Johnston, and Margaret Stohl as they discuss the variety of forms young adult writing takes, from fantasy, to graphic novel and more, and their own approaches to writing in the constantly shifting world of YA.
Robin Benway, moderator

And here’s the genreal info:

To celebrate its sixth year, Long Beach Comic Con is unveiling new initiatives including the show’s first ever Guests of Honor, this year’s official sponsors including media sponsor the Los Angeles Times’ Hero Complex and programming devoted to a broad range of attendees — from cosplay enthusiasts to young adult readers. Long Beach Comic Con will be held on September 27 and 28, 2014 at the Long Beach Convention Center, where exhibiting publishers will include Archie Comics, Aspen Comics, Bottled Lightning, PaperFilms, Skybound Entertainment, Storm King Productions, Top Cow, and Valiant Entertainment, among others.

For the first time in its history, Long Beach Comic Con is announcing guests of honor for this fall’s show:

Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa (Archie Comics’ AFTERLIFE WITH ARCHIE)

Mike Allred (Marvel Comics’ SILVER SURFER)

Laura Allred (Marvel Comics’ SILVER SURFER

Sandy King Carpenter (Storm King Production’s ASYLUM)

Joe Casey (Man of Action)

Amanda Conner (DC Entertainment’s HARLEY QUINN)

Chris Dingess (Skybound Entertainment’s MANIFEST DESTINY)

David Gallaher (Bottled Lightning’s THE ONLY LIVING BOY)

Joe Kelly (Man of Action)

JT Krul (Aspen’s JIRNI)

Mike Mignola (Dark Horse Comics’ HELLBOY)

James O’Barr (THE CROW)

Jimmy Palmiotti (PaperFilms’ SEX & VIOLENCE)

Jamie S. Rich (Oni Press’ Archer Coe and the Thousand Natural Shocks)

Duncan Rouleau (Man of Action)

Steven T. Seagle (Man of Action)

Marc Silvestri (Top Cow)

Richard Starking (Image Comic’s ELEPHANTMEN)

Babs Tarr (DC Entertainment’s BATGIRL)

“We’re thrilled to have more guests at this year’s show than we’ve ever had before,” said Martha Donato, Long Beach Comic Con Executive Director and Co-Founder. “We recognize that attending conventions is a major commitment for comic book creators and we want to honor and celebrate some of the people who’ve joined us for six years running, as well as the writers and artists who are traveling across the country to attend our convention for the first time.”

As in past years, attendees will be treated to a wide array of programming. Highlights include:

* Panels devoted to fan favorite comic book characters including Batman, the Crow and Hellboy.

* Comic Book Publisher Spotlights moderated by BLOODY DISGUSTING, COMICVINE, IGN, THE NERDIST and others.

* Hero Complex moderated panels of pop culture, running the gamut from Robot Chicken to Young Justice to Women in Comics.

* A Young Adult panel featuring best-selling novelists Leigh Bardugo, Robin Benway, Cecil Castellucci, Melissa de la Cruz, Michael Johnston, and Margaret Stohl

* A Banned Books Week discussion led by the Newport Beach Branch Library

* Cosplay panels.

* Horror programming with guests like Dan Brereton (NOCTURNALS) and Mike Huddleston (THE STRAIN).

* Kids programming with KaBOOM! and creators like Eric Esquivel (BRAVEST WARRIORS), Travis Hanson (TANNER JONES AND THE QUEST FOR THE MONKEY STONE), Mike Kunkel (HEROBEAR)  and Hannah Nance Partlow (ADVENTURE TIME). There will also be interactive panels where Tone Rodriguez will teach kids how to draw the Simpsons and Futurama characters and Peter Paul will teach “how to draw your dragon.”

* Animation panels dedicated to popular cartoons like GARGOYLES, SPECTACULAR SPIDER MAN, YOUNG JUSTICE, X-MEN and DISNEY AFTERNOON, and appearances by Greg Weisman and the Man of Action.

* Screen Junkies Presents: Honest Trailers The Panel

* #MakeComics workshops where aspiring writers and artists can learn from comic book greats including Jon Bogdanove (POWER PACK), Tim Bradstreet (HELLBLAZER), Brian Buccellato (DETECTIVE COMICS), Joshua Fialkov (THE BUNKER) and Whilce Portacio (THE PUNISHER). Over two days, workshops will walk through the entire #makecomics process: from writing and drawing to running a Kickstarter and even publicizing the comic.  

“Our programming has been a huge growth area for us this year,” said Phil Lawrence, Co-founder and Sales Director of Long Beach Comic Con. “We’re running more than 80 high quality panels over two days. There’s something for every fan, whether you want to hear about the latest from Image Comics or need tips for designing and building your first cosplay.”

Growth also extends to the show’s official sponsors. The CW’s The Flash, GenZe by Mahindra, the Laugh Factory, SGX Print, and the SUN NEWS have already signed on as official sponsors, and additional announcements are expected to follow in the coming weeks.

Enjoy an exciting weekend full of exceptional guests and exhibitors, and engaging panels, at Long Beach Comic Con, Saturday, September 27 from 10:00 am – 7:00 pm and Sunday, September 28 from 10:00 am – 5:00 pm at the Long Beach Convention Center. Tickets are available now through the website: www.longbeachcomiccon.com.

“Our ticket sales are significantly up from last year at this same time,” said Donato. “If you’re thinking about attending this year’s show, I recommend buying your tickets in advance before we sell out and arriving both days before the show opens.”

Follow Long Beach Comic Con on Facebook and Twitter for the latest news and information.

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