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Viewing: Blog Posts from All 1547 Blogs, since 1/28/2008 [Help]
Results 42,176 - 42,200 of 499,368
42176. Remembered this bit from Grace Paley’s “Friends"...



Remembered this bit from Grace Paley’s “Friends" today. Auld lang syne, motherfuckers.



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42177. Comment on Octopus Tea – Gothic Steampunk Girl by Leslie Stockton

YOU ARE AMAZING :)

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42178. Happy New Year ’14!

Have a blessed New Year’s Eve and day, one and all!

nye14 c&d a1 for blogs

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42179. Happy New Year

"For last year's words belong to last year's language and next year's words await another voice." - T.S. Elliot

Looking forward to all the new possibilities and wishing you the same.

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42180. Another one for the TBR list.

What the bee knowsWhat the Bee Knows, by P.L. Travers.

From SDSU Children's Literature:

Travers’ other writings are equally impressive, especially her novel Friend Monkey. A good introduction to her and her mythological way of thinking is What the Bee Knows, a collection of her essays that does Joseph Campbell one better and treats the path of women’s lives as seen in fairy tales, the deep meanings of “Humpty Dumpty,” the sacredness of names in aboriginal cultures, and new ways of understanding the story of the Prodigal Son.

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42181. M.T. Anderson's Thrilling Tales

If you like B-movies, then you must read M.T. Anderson's Thrilling Tales, aka Pals in Peril Tales, in which three bright kids try to stop nefarious villains from taking over the world and committing crazy crimes. Lily thinks of herself as an ordinary girl, especially when compared to her two best friends. After all, Katie and Jasper each starred in famous book series! Katie survived all kinds of creepy things in Horror Hollow while Jasper Dash, Boy Technonaut, invented gadgets and gizmos aplenty. When Lily learns what her father really does for a living, she enlists her friends' help and proves that she's anything but ordinary. Prepare to see a whale in a business suit, among other things, in the awesome illustrations by Kurt Cyrus.

- Whales on Stilts (Check out this adorable video review I found on YouTube.)
- The Clue of the Linoleum Lederhosen
- Jasper Dash and the Flame-Pits of Delaware

Also check out my Funny Fiction for Kids booklist.

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42182. The Arlie Jacobs books by Emily Ecton

If you like M.T. Anderson's Thrilling Tales, then you'll like Emily Ecton's books as well. In the first book, Boots and Pieces, readers meet middle school student Arlie Jacobs, her best friend Ty (who is a boy but definitely not her boyfriend), her older sister Tina (who loves fashionable clothes as much as Arlie doesn't), her parents, and her family's Chihuahua, Mr. Boots (who gets dressed up in doll clothes by Tina and her mom).

When a local girl mysteriously disappears, the adults in town try to reinforce safety measures for the kids. Then more teens disappear, and some adults act like it's no big deal, like they just ran away. Arlie and Ty check out the swamp and discover a large weird-looking creature that dissolves people and other animals just by touching them.

This series will be appreciated by those who like The Middleman, the aforementioned M.T. Anderson books, or sillier tongue-in-cheek episodes of Doctor Who. Arlie has a snark to her, but it doesn't come across as biting or mean - it's simply part of her personality, and she will sometimes act first and think later. Even with its gigantic swamp creature, the book is more funny than scary, and that's how it's intended. Just wait 'til you get to the climax and see which sassy person saves the day!

There are three books in the series:
- Boots and Pieces
- The Curse of Cuddles McGee
- Night of the Living Lawn Ornaments

Read my interview with Emily Ecton.

Also check out my Funny Fiction for Kids booklist.

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42183. Where did I go? Out. What did I do? Nothing. OR, why I'm coming back to the blog once more...

posted by Neil Gaiman

It's been a while since I blogged. I'm not entirely sure why I stopped – guilt partly. Lou Reed died, and I was going to write a blog about Lou, but I wrote a piece for the  Guardian about Lou and what his music had meant to me instead.

And then it seemed so many things had happened, and I had not written about any of them, and catching up seemed less and less possible. I was not worried because there was Twitter and there was Tumblr and people were seeing what I was doing as I did it.

Despite an epic blast of food poisoning, I survived the World Fantasy Convention in the UK, and went to LA for a conference on magical history, where I also I interviewed JJ Abrams and Doug Dorst about their book S for BBC 2's Newsnight. I don't think I have a new career waiting in TV interviewing, but it was fun and enlightening and I asked my questions as well as the BBC's:



I had a birthday, a quiet one, at home in the Midwest, and saw my dog and my friends and warmed my hands at a bonfire.

I had a conversation at the Rubin Museum with Laurie Anderson. We talked about Ignorance. This was inspiring and magical.



There were the two EVENING WITH NEIL AND AMANDA nights at the Town Hall in NYC. The first was chaos, and Amanda loved it and I didn't, and the second was perfectly structured and ran as planned, and I loved it and Amanda didn't. (The second was on the 23rd of November, the 50th Anniversary of Doctor Who: Amanda and I saw the 3D screening of The Day of the Doctor first, and loved it, and Arthur Darvill, fresh from ONCE, joined us on stage to hold placards that night).

I was on WBUR with Tom Ashbrook, talking about Sandman: Overture.

Thanksgiving was spent with Amanda's friends, family and Cloud-club-mates at our place in Cambridge MA.

I gave a talk about creativity to the C.A.V.E. Conference in Las Vegas, and spent time with Skottie Young and Dave Gibbons and went to see LOVE with Skottie and Joe Quesada.

I went to the UK for three days: I had a glorious time reading a letter from Kurt Vonnegut Jr at the Reading Agency Benefit along with a star-studded cast, and then doing an auction with fellow auctioneer Gillian Anderson and book models Benedict Cumberbatch and Nick Cave. We raised over £11,000 for the Reading Agency (a Good Thing).

You can read about it, and watch Benedict and Gillian in letter-reading action at http://readingagency.org.uk/adults/news/cumberbatch-cave-anderson-and-gaiman-join-together-in-praise-of-letters.html

The next night was the National Book Awards, sponsored by Specsavers. I was nominated for three book awards – Author of the Year (for Ocean at the End of the Lane), Children's Book of the Year (for Fortunately the Milk) and Audiobook of the Year. I won Audiobook of the Year, for The Ocean at the End of the Lane. I wore a tie and everything, and was grateful.

I had several mysterious meetings the following day, particularly with the United Nations High Council on Refugees, for and with whom I'm hoping to do something good in 2014, then I came back to the US.

Straight to New York. I has been asked by author Molly Oldfield to read Dickens' prompt copy of A CHRISTMAS CAROL, and had agreed if I could do it with a Dickensian beard and in Victorian Garb: I remembered seeing actor Emlyn Williams performing an evening of Charles Dickens when I was a boy, and the clothes and the beard were all. It happened, and was unlikely and delightful.






The holidays were spent in the sun, with the family, and were made extra-wonderful when I learned that Ocean At The End of the Lane had been voted the UK's Book of the Year.

...

And now I'm thinking about the year to come. I'm planning a social media sabbatical for the first 6 months (I talked about it here: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2013/jun/14/neil-gaiman-social-media-sabbatical). It's about writing more and talking to the world less. It's time.

I plan to blog here MUCH more, as a way of warming up my fingers and my mind, and as a way of getting important information out into the world. I'm planning to be on Tumblr and Twitter and Facebook MUCH less, although I'll make sure that posts letting people know about new blogs here keep going up, and I may nip out into the world from time to time to plug good causes.

Keep an eye on http://www.neilgaiman.com/where/ which will tell you where I'm likely to show up in person, and how to get tickets:

21 Feb 2014Billings, MontanaAn Afternoon with Neil Gaiman
21 Feb 2014Billings, MontanaAn Evening with Neil Gaiman
24 Feb 2014Calgary, CanadaAn Evening with Neil Gaiman [SOLD OUT]
07 Mar 2014Glassboro, NJGood Art: An Evening with Neil Gaiman
29 Apr 2014Syracuse, NYNeil Gaiman at The Oncenter Crouse Hinds Theater
07 May 2014New York, NYAn Evening with Neil Gaiman
is the current list.

If you are used to hanging out with me on Tumblr or Twitter or Facebook, you are very welcome here. Same me, only with more than 140 characters. It'll be fun. Or it'll be like watching someone giving up smoking.










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42184. The Double Traitor

So I finally read The Double Traitor, by E. Philips Oppenheim, and I’m not surprised that it’s Evangeline‘s favorite of his books, because it’s awesome.

Francis Norgate is a young diplomat, recently assigned to Berlin. He’s sent home again after only a month, having offended one of the Kaiser’s family members, which sucks for him professionally, but turns out to be for the best. On the way home, Norgate encounters Mr. Selingmann, a German businessman, and becomes suspicious of him. But neither his bosses, his friend who’s a cabinet minister, or Scotland Yard will pay any attention, so he singlehandedly sets himself up as a double agent and does what he can to prepare for war.

The Double Traitor isn’t as twisty as the other Oppenheim books I’ve read, but it’s suspenseful in a fairly straightforward way, keeping you guessing about whose loyalties lie where. You’re never in doubt of Norgate — which is nice because it allows you to sit back and watch him work — but pretty much everyone else is a bit of a question mark. Mostly this is a novel about how Norgate goes about being a double agent, which it turns out is a thing he’s mostly pretty well fitted for. He’s also ridiculously open at times — I love that he’s constantly going to his friend Hebbelthwaite and saying, “So, this is what I’ve been getting up to lately in my capacity as a German spy,” but…well, really?

There were things that I found disatisfying, and threads that were dropped and never picked up again. I never figured out exactly what happened with the suicide of one of the characters early in the book, and I objected pretty strongly to the way Oppenheim dealt with Norgate’s manservant. But mostly this was almost as much fun as I’ve ever had with an Oppenheim novel. It helps that the other Oppenhem novel it most resembles is my favorite, The Great Impersonation (which I’ve apparently never written about? I could have sworn I had). Both are about spies and impending war, and a particular type of young man working alone for his country. I like Oppenheim less when he does financial conspiracies and politics and people who are totally self-absorbed. But this has only a little bit of those, and lots of patriotic fervor and a young couple who work well together and almost an excess of spies. It’s pretty cool.


Tagged: 1910s, adventure, ephillipsoppenheim, spies, wwI

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42185. So Long 2013. We hardly gnu ye!

happy gnu year 2014 450

This here fella is a redraw from a couple of years ago… or a re-gnu-ed drawing, if you will. He seemed eager to return and join in the last party of 2013. So I threw him a bone.

Along with 2013 ending, so too concludes HoHoDooDa 2013! A hearty thanks to all of you talented participants for the camaraderie, encouragement and fantastic art you have put forth this December. It’s not easy to commit to a sketch a day at any time of the year, but around the holidays… hoooooo boy! What an inspiration!

A big thanks also to everyone who followed along and cheered us on. You can’t know how helpful and incredibly uplifting that is!

All y’all really made this holiday season heartwarmingly special! May 2014 bring each and every one of you all the love, health, prosperity and creative inspiration there is to be brought!

Happy Happy Happy New (and Gnu) Year to everyone!!!

P.S. Why not take one more peek at all the cool HoHoDooDaers right here before dipping into the cheese ball and pouring that celebratory glass of bubbly!


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42186. Happy New Year, Folks!

Wishing you all the Very Best for 2014

 
 
Until next time, have fun!
Tim Perkins…
December 31st 2013

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42187. The Cybils Shortlists Are Nigh!

Cybils2013SmallTonight at midnight (Arizona time), the Cybils shortlists will be announced in all 11 categories (plus some sub-categories). Stay tuned at Cybils.com for the finalists. 

I truly believe that the Cybils shortlists are one of the finest resources that the Kidlitosphere has to offer. They are the result of > 50 round 1 bloggers (teachers, librarians, parents, authors, and more), who have read their way through more than 1300 nominated titles across the various categories. These tireless readers have winnowed each category down to a list of five to seven titles that believe are the most kid-friendly and well-written of the bunch. 

The Cybils shortlists are available by age range and genre (poetry, graphic novels, non-fiction, fiction, speculative fiction, book apps). Each list offers a wonderful starting place for anyone who is looking for great new books for a particular child. You can browse past shortlist by going to Cybils.com and following the links in the upper right-hand corner. For this year's lists, as I said, stay tuned. They are coming in just a few short hours. And they are fabulous! 

© 2013 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook

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42188. Hail the New Year, Lads and Lasses

(Woodland Nutcracker mice, closeup)
  "Come, Scotland's dearest holiday,
Auld-fashioned, hearty Hogmanay!
How foul or fair the weather be
A kindly welcome waiteth thee;"
William Thom, 1799-1848
Happy New Year to all!

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42189. Asynchronicity!

Asynchronistic_DebbieTilley_SM

I received the following question recently: “I’m interested in your online CB illustrators course at UCSD, but can’t find the link. Can you please post it again? Also, I travel overseas a lot for work. Would that preclude me from taking the online course, i.e., are the classroom times synchronistic or can you work at your own pace? Many thanks!! [from Linda Benson]

Great question! You can take the class at your own pace. It’s a 9-week course, with a new exercise/assignment given at the start of each week. You post completed exercises online, to share with classmates, at the end of each week. And you can post questions at the Class Discussion Board anytime, too. It’s an asynchronous class

For more info, go here.
Register anytime, 24/7, here.


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42190. Looking back at 2013…

champagne-glassesIt’s New Year’s eve and tomorrow we all get clean slates. But before we guzzle the champagne and resolve to write ten books this year, I think we ought to look back at all that we’ve accomplished in 2013.

Trust me, I bet you’ve done more than you think you have.

For me, 2013 has been a hard year. One of the hardest recently, and I’ll be happy to see it go. This might seem like a funny thing for me to say, because some pretty big things happened for me this year. I got engaged, I got an agent, and I finished graduate school. Yes, these are great victories! But it’s always the writing that feels like a constant uphill battle. Trying to keep my energy up, find the time, balance my personal and professional life, and be sure to put my fingers to the keyboard each week.

It takes so long to write a book, and because of the length of the process, I often feel like I haven’t accomplished much at all. So, I decided to try and quantify the writing I did this year. It’s hard to know the amount of hours I put in (though one of my new year’s resolutions is to keep a time sheet), so I’ve decided to count my words instead. What turned up surprised me. I’ve actually put in a lot more work than I thought.

My word count totals for 2013 are:

  • 60,162 words: Steampunk novel (first draft).
  • 58,612 words: Fantasy novel (NaNoWriMo draft).
  • 20,000 new words, and countless polishing drafts that can’t be quantified in word count: Contemporary YA novel (8000th draft)
  • 17,123 words: Sci-Fi novel (first draft, co-written)
  • 2013 Yearly Total: 155,897 words

Book magic (1)Dang, I’ve been busy.

And I bet you’ve been busy too.

When you drink your champagne tonight, drink it in honor of all the great writing you did this year. Drink in honor of your perseverance and your passion. Let the quiet work you’ve done behind your computer fuel you into 2014.

Have a happy New Year!


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42191. Thanks, 2013!

2013 was, as most years are, a very interesting year. Still, when I look back, I'd say the dominant theme was that The 14 Fibs of Gregory K. finally became a book. And for that I say, "Thanks, 2013!"



Wishing you all a happy, healthy New Year's Eve tonight and in years to come!

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42192. Happy 2014!

Happy New Year to one and all!

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42193. Happy New Year!

©Lesley Breen Withrow

(The front and back of my well-received fall postcard mailer that 
my agent send out to children's book publishers)

Well, 2013 has been an incredible year for me. In February I started working at The Gift Wrap Company, designing amazing patterns and products like: wrapping paper, gift bags, journals, stickers, kids activities books and more. A real dream job. In 2013 I also became a part of Chris Tugeau's wonderful children's book art agency. This fall I was thrilled to get such a wonderful response to my postcard mailing to publishers and I am happy to announce that I am working on my first trade children's book! (more about it in the future). So many of my dreams have become a reality this year. I'm looking forward to what's next. Happy 2014 everyone!!!

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42194. Saying Goodbye to 2013

It's fun to take a look at my 2013 through photos. Come along with me, if you'd like to take a peak.

The year had some big stuff--like circus elephants


and a winter wedding...


Plus more fun-- visits from the Easter Bunny


and puddle splashing...

There were zebras ...


and chocolate birthday cupcakes...

There were New Mexico hummingbirds and ....

California "Hummers"--signing with Mira Reisberg at Hummingbird Literary

There were Cardinal Playoff Games

and new books...

and book signings...


and my writer buddies...

As you can see, it was a wonderful year. 

Lots of new adventures
And lots of writing...

Here's wishing you and yours A Wonderful 2014!


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42195. Happy New Year! Reach for the stars in 2014!!

http://phyllisharrisdesigns.bigcartel.com/product/inspirational-wall-art-reach-for-the-stars-girl-s-wall-decor

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42196. gwendabond: fuckyeahmobydick: Whales, Ships and Icebergs...







gwendabond:

fuckyeahmobydick:

Whales, Ships and Icebergs by Sophie Blackall

Adore Sophie Blackall.







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42197. The Year of the Horse

17654208The Year of the Horse (CAN, JP, US, INT)

Written by: Oliver Chin

Illustrated by: Jennifer Wood

Published by: Immedium

Published on: December 31, 2013

Ages: 4+

Provided by the published for review. All opinions are my own.






Happy New Year! Welcome to the year of the horse. This is my year (by the Japanese calendar). Please don't figure out how old I am. ;)

The Japanese zodiac is mostly the same as the Chinese one, but the new year in Japan starts on January 1 rather than following the old calendar. Which means those of us born in January/February are often a different zodiac animal depending on whether we are using the Chinese or Japanese zodiac. I'm a horse in Japan but a snake according to the Chinese zodiac.

This is the first book in the Tales from the Chinese Zodiac series that I have seen, but there are other including the Year of the Dragon, Rabbit, Tiger, Ox, and Rat. These stories aren't specifically about new year celebrations, but about the animals from the year.

The Year of the Horse stars Hannah the horse and Tom, the artist's student, who are both finding their way in the world. They end up going on a big journey, and along the way they meet up with the various other zodiac animals while learning the value of teamwork.

My kids both really liked the cartoon-like illustrations and it really helps that the plotting is quick and Wood's illustrations are great at conveying movement.

It's so fantastic to find books related to the New Year as we celebrate it here in Japan, so I definitely recommend this to English speakers in Japan as well as other people with kids!

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42198. Looking back at 2013…

champagne-glassesIt’s New Year’s eve and tomorrow we all get clean slates. But before we guzzle the champagne and resolve to write ten books this year, I think we ought to look back at all that we’ve accomplished in 2013.

Trust me, I bet you’ve done more than you think you have.

For me, 2013 has been a hard year. One of the hardest recently, and I’ll be happy to see it go. This might seem like a funny thing for me to say, because some pretty big things happened for me this year. I got engaged, I got an agent, and I finished graduate school. Yes, these are great victories! But it’s always the writing that feels like a constant uphill battle. Trying to keep my energy up, find the time, balance my personal and professional life, and be sure to put my fingers to the keyboard each week.

It takes so long to write a book, and because of the length of the process, I often feel like I haven’t accomplished much at all. So, I decided to try and quantify the writing I did this year. It’s hard to know the amount of hours I put in (though one of my new year’s resolutions is to keep a time sheet), so I’ve decided to count my words instead. What turned up surprised me. I’ve actually put in a lot more work than I thought.

My word count totals for 2013 are:

  • 60,162 words: Steampunk novel (first draft).
  • 58,612 words: Fantasy novel (NaNoWriMo draft).
  • 20,000 new words, and countless polishing drafts that can’t be quantified in word count: Contemporary YA novel (8000th draft)
  • 17,123 words: Sci-Fi novel (first draft, co-written)
  • 2013 Yearly Total: 155,897 words

Book magic (1)Dang, I’ve been busy.

And I bet you’ve been busy too.

When you drink your champagne tonight, drink it in honor of all the great writing you did this year. Drink in honor of your perseverance and your passion. Let the quiet work you’ve done behind your computer fuel you into 2014.

Have a happy New Year!


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42199. Happy New Year 2014



As 2013 ends and 2014 begins I wish you all the joy, health, and success that this world has to offer throughout 2014 and beyond. Of course, heartaches and adversity are part of our journey and it's important we focus on the positives that are bestowed us. Celebrate each success and enjoy your life!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Best wishes,
Donna M. McDine
Award-winning Children's Author
Connect with

Powder Monkey ~ May 2013 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc.

Hockey Agony ~ January 2013 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc.

The Golden Pathway ~ August 2010 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc.
~ Literary Classics Silver Award and Seal of Approval, Readers Favorite 2012 International Book Awards Honorable Mention and Dan Poynter's Global e-Book Awards Finalist











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42200. how to “rung” in the new year

From "Frog and Toad"  by Arnold Lobel

From “Frog and Toad”
by Arnold Lobel

.

When you’re up high, let’s say on a ladder, people always tell you, don’t look down. But do me a favor, will you? Take a minute to glance over your shoulder. That’s right, look down the ladder the today. Here’s why . . .

When your sole focus is looking up the publishing ladder as you struggle to climb rung by rung, it’s easy to feel like you’ll never reach the top. But let me encourage you to hold the rung a second. Pause. Even for a moment. Stop craning your neck upward and turn. Look back down that ladder. You started at the bottom, maybe this year or maybe years ago. Now, see how far you’ve come!

Today, before you uncork some bubbly or sing that silly “Auld Lang Syne,” make a list–not a mental list, a REAL list on paper or screen–of all you’ve accomplished this year toward your writing goals. You have so much to be proud of. (I know, I should have said, You have so much of which to be proud, but that sounds kind of snooty for my purposes, and using proper grammar wasn’t one of my goals for 2013!)

Sure, there’s a lot more you want to do (same here), but treat yourself to a moment to appreciate how high you’ve already climbed. Take a deep breath. Enjoy the view!

My “rungs” for 2013 include:

January – Attending the annual SCBWI winter conference in New York City. Amazing!
February – Seeing my non-fiction article “Sculpting Lincoln” in Highlights for Children magazine.
March – Participating in a writers workshop at Vermont College of Fine Arts and receiving encouragement from incredible YA authors Cynthia Leitich Smith, Lauren Myracle and Candlewick editor Andrea Tompa.
July – Celebrating with my dear friend Kelly Barson on her debut novel “45 Pounds More or Less”–and being honored to be included in her acknowledgements page–a first for me!
November – Being selected to be part of the SCBWI – Eastern New York Falling Leaves master class workshop in Silver Bay, New York, and meeting five amazing edtiors, along with more than 30 encouraging writers.
December
- Enjoying another year of mutual support and feedback from my wonderful critique group (aka, Church of the Word!).
- Toasting the first anniversary of “Frog on a Dime.” I started with zero followers and now have 1,043. (Not record shattering, but hey, it’s progress.)
- Finishing through Lesson 8 of 9 in my Institute of Children’s Literature writing class. My second middle grade novel is almost done.
- Gathering ideas and details for my third middle grade novel that’s bubbling to the surface (Finally! Phew.) Exciting!

I’m wishing I could say my second novel is completely done. I’d like to say I have an agent and a two-book deal a publishing house. But those rungs are just ahead of me (fingers and toes crossed). I’ll be delighted to put those on my 2014 rung list.

What’s that? You say you submitted your work this year, but only have a stack of rejection letters to show for it? Well, that’s VERY rung-list worthy. (Honest. I’m not just saying that to give you something to put on your list.) You submitted your work (it’s virtually impossible to receive a letter of rejection otherwise!) You wrote, revised, researched publishers and took the leap to share your work for consideration. Okay, so you didn’t get the desired response, but you’re now ready to narrow your search and target new houses for submission in the new year. That’s great. Rung it up!

Happy New Year! Let’s “rung” it in together. Umquam porro. Ever forward, my friends. Ever forward. Rung by rung.

A poet is a man who puts up a ladder to a star and climbs it while playing a violin. ~ Edmond de Goncourt


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