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1. And The Award Goes To... Hugo Awards 2016








Aussiecon 4 Hugo, created by Nick Stathopoulos, etched by Lewis Morley, logo by Grant Gittus, who designed my favourite book cover, for Crime Time. Fair use, but I know the boys won't mind.

This list of nominees/winners is pinched from the TOR website. Alas, I haven't read any of the nominated titles let alone the winners! It tends to be the case with these awards - so much American stuff on the list, so harder to get in local bookshops, and at a time of year when I am busy reading for the CBCA  Awards, which are, after all, for our local books - and who knows how long those will be published if the Productivity Commission gets its way? Maybe next year I'll join as a supporting member. It's not too expensive and you get to read the nominated works in ebook, at least, quite good value! And then you get to vote. 

I see that Mike Glyer has won yet again, both for best fanzine and best fan writer. He and Dave Langford between them have  racked up quite a lot of Hugo wins! 

I see also, looking down the list, that the Puppies have been up to their old tricks yet again, slating. I mean, why? They must know it won't work, and last year was a particularly nasty year, in which both sides were horrible. If I'd been a member of the Puppy committee I would have made sure that the loudest-mouthed people on the other side were on this year's slate... and sat back and grinned while they denied frantically any connection... They would have refused their nominations, of course, but there would have been a lot of fun meanwhile. 

And frankly, some of them would have  deserved it, IMO. The whole business caused a lot of disagreement and unpleasantness in the committee of my lovely ASIM. I'm out of it now, except as a slush reader, but it was a bad year for me, and spoiled somewhat my pride in my first ASIM editing.

Anyway, why not just set up their own awards? It can be done. It has been done to a certain extent with the Prometheus Awards for libertarian SF. I was horrified to find a Poul Anderson novel among the winners of that award, but then I read it and said, "Oh. I get it."

The awards could even be presented at Worldcon, if they asked nicely. 

Still, there's no reasoning with some people.

Anyway, as a service, here's the list, with winners in bold. Congratulations to everyone who made it this far. Remember, someone cared enough to nominate your work. You're all winners! I see Ann Leckie was shortlisted again and would like to remind anyone who sneered at ASIM last year that she made one of her earliest sales to us, as did plenty of others, eg off the top of my head, Jim C Hines. 


BEST NOVEL 

The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin (Orbit)
Ancillary Mercy by Ann Leckie (Orbit)
The Cinder Spires: The Aeronaut’s Windlass by Jim Butcher (Roc)
Seveneves: A Novel by Neal Stephenson (William Morrow)
Uprooted by Naomi Novik (Del Rey)

BEST NOVELLA

Binti by Nnedi Okorafor (Tor.com)
The Builders by Daniel Polansky (Tor.com)
Penric’s Demon by Lois McMaster Bujold (Spectrum)
Perfect State by Brandon Sanderson (Dragonsteel Entertainment)
Slow Bullets by Alastair Reynolds (Tachyon)

BEST NOVELETTE 

“Folding Beijing” by Hao Jingfang, Ken Liu (Uncanny Magazine, Jan‐Feb 2015)
“And You Shall Know Her by the Trail of Dead” by Brooke Bolander (Lightspeed, Feb 2015)
“Flashpoint: Titan” by CHEAH Kai Wai (There Will Be War Volume X, Castalia House)
“Obits” by Stephen King (The Bazaar of Bad Dreams, Scribner)
“What Price Humanity?” by David Van Dyke (There Will Be War Volume X, Castalia House)

BEST SHORT STORY 

“Cat Pictures Please” by Naomi Kritzer (Clarkesworld, January 2015)
“Asymmetrical Warfare” by S. Algernon (Nature, Mar 2015)
“If You Were an Award, My Love” by Juan Tabo and Harris (voxday.blogspot.com, Jun 2015)
“Seven Kill Tiger” by Charles Shao (There Will Be WarVolume X, Castalia House)
Space Raptor Butt Invasion by Chuck Tingle (Amazon Digital Services)

BEST RELATED WORK 

No Award - (presumably because everything here was on a Puppies slate?)

Between Light and Shadow: An Exploration of the Fiction of Gene Wolfe, 1951 to 1986 by Marc Aramini (Castalia House)
“The First Draft of My Appendix N Book” by Jeffro Johnson (wordpress.com)
“Safe Space as Rape Room” by Daniel Eness (castcom)
SJWs Always Lie: Taking Down the Thought Police by Vox Day (Castalia House)
“The Story of Moira Greyland” by Moira Greyland (com)

BEST GRAPHIC STORY 

The Sandman: Overture written by Neil Gaiman, art by J.H. Williams III (Vertigo)
The Divine written by Boaz Lavie, art by Asaf Hanuka and Tomer Hanuka (First Second)
Erin Dies Alone written by Grey Carter, art by Cory Rydell (dynet)
Full Frontal Nerdity by Aaron Williams (nodwick.com)
Invisible Republic Vol 1 written by Corinna Bechko and Gabriel Hardman, art by Gabriel Hardman (Image Comics)

BEST DRAMATIC PRESENTATION (LONG FORM) 

The Martian screenplay by Drew Goddard, directed by Ridley Scott (Scott Free Productions; Kinberg Genre; TSG Entertainment; 20th Century Fox)
Avengers: Age of Ultron written and directed by Joss Whedon (Marvel Studios; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures)
Ex Machina written and directed by Alex Garland (Film4; DNA Films; Universal Pictures)
Mad Max: Fury Road written by George Miller, Brendan McCarthy, and Nico Lathouris, directed by George Miller (Village Roadshow Pictures; Kennedy Miller Mitchell; RatPac‐ Dune Entertainment; Warner Bros. Pictures)
Star Wars: The Force Awakens written by Lawrence Kasdan, J. Abrams, and Michael Arndt, directed by J.J. Abrams (Lucasfilm Ltd.; Bad Robot Productions; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures)

BEST DRAMATIC PRESENTATION (SHORT FORM

Jessica Jones: “AKA Smile” written by Scott Reynolds, Melissa Rosenberg, and Jamie King, directed by Michael Rymer (Marvel Television; ABC Studios; Tall Girls Productions; Netflix)
Doctor Who: “Heaven Sent” written by Steven Moffat, directed by Rachel Talalay (BBC Television)
Grimm: “Headache” written by Jim Kouf and David Greenwalt, directed by Jim Kouf (Universal Television; GK Productions; Hazy Mills Productions; Open 4 Business Productions; NBCUniversal Television Distribution)
My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic: “The Cutie Map” Parts 1 and 2 written by Scott Sonneborn, A. Larson, and Meghan McCarthy, directed by Jayson Thiessen and Jim Miller (DHX Media/Vancouver; Hasbro Studios)
Supernatural: “Just My Imagination” written by Jenny Klein, directed by Richard Speight (Kripke Enterprises; Wonderland Sound and Vision; Warner Bros. Television)

BEST EDITOR ‐ SHORT FORM

Ellen Datlow
John Joseph Adams
Neil Clarke
Jerry Pournelle
Sheila Williams

BEST EDITOR ‐ LONG FORM 

Sheila E. Gilbert
Liz Gorinsky
Jim Minz
Toni Weisskopf
Vox Day

BEST PROFESSIONAL ARTIST 

Abigail Larson
Lars Braad Andersen
Larry Elmore
Michal Karcz
Larry Rostant

BEST SEMIPROZINE

Uncanny Magazine edited by Edited by Lynne M. Thomas & Michael Damian Thomas, Michi Trota, and Erika Ensign & Steven Schapansky
Beneath Ceaseless Skies edited by Scott Andrews, Nicole Lavigne, and Kate Marshall
Daily Science Fiction edited by Michele‐Lee Barasso and Jonathan Laden
Sci Phi Journal edited by Jason Rennie
Strange Horizons edited by Catherine Krahe, Julia Rios, J. Odasso, Vanessa Rose Phin, Maureen Kincaid Speller, and theStrange Horizons staff

BEST FANZINE 

“File 770” edited by Mike Glyer
“Castalia House Blog” edited by Jeffro Johnson
“Lady Business” edited by Clare, Ira, Jodie, KJ, Renay, and Susan
“Superversive SF” edited by Jason Rennie
“Tangent Online” edited by Dave Truesdale

BEST FANCAST 

No Award
8‐4 Play, Mark MacDonald, John Ricciardi, Hiroko Minamoto, and Justin Epperson
Cane and Rinse, Cane and Rinse
HelloGreedo, HelloGreedo
The Rageaholic, RazörFist
Tales to Terrify, Stephen Kilpatrick

BEST FAN WRITER

Mike Glyer
Douglas Ernst
Morgan Holmes
Jeffro Johnson
Shamus Young

BEST FAN ARTIST 

Steve Stiles
Matthew Callahan
disse86
Kukuruyo
Christian Quinot

JOHN W. CAMPBELL AWARD FOR BEST NEW WRITER 

Andy Weir *
Pierce Brown *
Sebastien de Castell *
Brian Niemeier
Alyssa Wong *
* Finalists in their 2nd year of eligibility.

FOREST J. ACKERMAN AWARD

Joe Siclari & Evie Stern



0 Comments on And The Award Goes To... Hugo Awards 2016 as of 8/26/2016 8:23:00 PM
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2. Mini-update

I've been blogging here since 2002 but this past year I haven't been keeping it up regularly. I'm active on twitter, please follow me there for all the news, rants, and adorable things my 5yos say. In the meantime, feast your eyes on the gorgeous covers the Books of Bayern will be getting in 2017.

Bayern_GooseGirl

Bayern_EnnaBurning

Bayern_RiverSecrets

Bayern_ForestBorn

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3. And The Award Goes To... Hugo Awards 2016








Aussiecon 4 Hugo, created by Nick Stathopoulos, etched by Lewis Morley, logo by Grant Gittus, who designed my favourite book cover, for Crime Time. Fair use, but I know the boys won't mind.

This list of nominees/winners is pinched from the TOR website. Alas, I haven't read any of the nominated titles let alone the winners! It tends to be the case with these awards - so much American stuff on the list, so harder to get in local bookshops, and at a time of year when I am busy reading for the CBCA  Awards, which are, after all, for our local books - and who knows how long those will be published if the Productivity Commission gets its way? Maybe next year I'll join as a supporting member. It's not too expensive and you get to read the nominated works in ebook, at least, quite good value! And then you get to vote. 

I see that Mike Glyer has won yet again, both for best fanzine and best fan writer. He and Dave Langford between them have  racked up quite a lot of Hugo wins! 

I see also, looking down the list, that the Puppies have been up to their old tricks yet again, slating. I mean, why? They must know it won't work, and last year was a particularly nasty year, in which both sides were horrible. If I'd been a member of the Puppy committee I would have made sure that the loudest-mouthed people on the other side were on this year's slate... and sat back and grinned while they denied frantically any connection... They would have refused their nominations, of course, but there would have been a lot of fun meanwhile. 

And frankly, some of them would have  deserved it, IMO. The whole business caused a lot of disagreement and unpleasantness in the committee of my lovely ASIM. I'm out of it now, except as a slush reader, but it was a bad year for me, and spoiled somewhat my pride in my first ASIM editing.

Anyway, why not just set up their own awards? It can be done. It has been done to a certain extent with the Prometheus Awards for libertarian SF. I was horrified to find a Poul Anderson novel among the winners of that award, but then I read it and said, "Oh. I get it."

The awards could even be presented at Worldcon, if they asked nicely. 

Still, there's no reasoning with some people.

Anyway, as a service, here's the list, with winners in bold. Congratulations to everyone who made it this far. Remember, someone cared enough to nominate your work. You're all winners! I see Ann Leckie was shortlisted again and would like to remind anyone who sneered at ASIM last year that she made one of her earliest sales to us, as did plenty of others, eg off the top of my head, Jim C Hines. 


BEST NOVEL 

The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin (Orbit)
Ancillary Mercy by Ann Leckie (Orbit)
The Cinder Spires: The Aeronaut’s Windlass by Jim Butcher (Roc)
Seveneves: A Novel by Neal Stephenson (William Morrow)
Uprooted by Naomi Novik (Del Rey)

BEST NOVELLA

Binti by Nnedi Okorafor (Tor.com)
The Builders by Daniel Polansky (Tor.com)
Penric’s Demon by Lois McMaster Bujold (Spectrum)
Perfect State by Brandon Sanderson (Dragonsteel Entertainment)
Slow Bullets by Alastair Reynolds (Tachyon)

BEST NOVELETTE 

“Folding Beijing” by Hao Jingfang, Ken Liu (Uncanny Magazine, Jan‐Feb 2015)
“And You Shall Know Her by the Trail of Dead” by Brooke Bolander (Lightspeed, Feb 2015)
“Flashpoint: Titan” by CHEAH Kai Wai (There Will Be War Volume X, Castalia House)
“Obits” by Stephen King (The Bazaar of Bad Dreams, Scribner)
“What Price Humanity?” by David Van Dyke (There Will Be War Volume X, Castalia House)

BEST SHORT STORY 

“Cat Pictures Please” by Naomi Kritzer (Clarkesworld, January 2015)
“Asymmetrical Warfare” by S. Algernon (Nature, Mar 2015)
“If You Were an Award, My Love” by Juan Tabo and Harris (voxday.blogspot.com, Jun 2015)
“Seven Kill Tiger” by Charles Shao (There Will Be WarVolume X, Castalia House)
Space Raptor Butt Invasion by Chuck Tingle (Amazon Digital Services)

BEST RELATED WORK 

No Award - (presumably because everything here was on a Puppies slate?)

Between Light and Shadow: An Exploration of the Fiction of Gene Wolfe, 1951 to 1986 by Marc Aramini (Castalia House)
“The First Draft of My Appendix N Book” by Jeffro Johnson (wordpress.com)
“Safe Space as Rape Room” by Daniel Eness (castcom)
SJWs Always Lie: Taking Down the Thought Police by Vox Day (Castalia House)
“The Story of Moira Greyland” by Moira Greyland (com)

BEST GRAPHIC STORY 

The Sandman: Overture written by Neil Gaiman, art by J.H. Williams III (Vertigo)
The Divine written by Boaz Lavie, art by Asaf Hanuka and Tomer Hanuka (First Second)
Erin Dies Alone written by Grey Carter, art by Cory Rydell (dynet)
Full Frontal Nerdity by Aaron Williams (nodwick.com)
Invisible Republic Vol 1 written by Corinna Bechko and Gabriel Hardman, art by Gabriel Hardman (Image Comics)

BEST DRAMATIC PRESENTATION (LONG FORM) 

The Martian screenplay by Drew Goddard, directed by Ridley Scott (Scott Free Productions; Kinberg Genre; TSG Entertainment; 20th Century Fox)
Avengers: Age of Ultron written and directed by Joss Whedon (Marvel Studios; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures)
Ex Machina written and directed by Alex Garland (Film4; DNA Films; Universal Pictures)
Mad Max: Fury Road written by George Miller, Brendan McCarthy, and Nico Lathouris, directed by George Miller (Village Roadshow Pictures; Kennedy Miller Mitchell; RatPac‐ Dune Entertainment; Warner Bros. Pictures)
Star Wars: The Force Awakens written by Lawrence Kasdan, J. Abrams, and Michael Arndt, directed by J.J. Abrams (Lucasfilm Ltd.; Bad Robot Productions; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures)

BEST DRAMATIC PRESENTATION (SHORT FORM

Jessica Jones: “AKA Smile” written by Scott Reynolds, Melissa Rosenberg, and Jamie King, directed by Michael Rymer (Marvel Television; ABC Studios; Tall Girls Productions; Netflix)
Doctor Who: “Heaven Sent” written by Steven Moffat, directed by Rachel Talalay (BBC Television)
Grimm: “Headache” written by Jim Kouf and David Greenwalt, directed by Jim Kouf (Universal Television; GK Productions; Hazy Mills Productions; Open 4 Business Productions; NBCUniversal Television Distribution)
My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic: “The Cutie Map” Parts 1 and 2 written by Scott Sonneborn, A. Larson, and Meghan McCarthy, directed by Jayson Thiessen and Jim Miller (DHX Media/Vancouver; Hasbro Studios)
Supernatural: “Just My Imagination” written by Jenny Klein, directed by Richard Speight (Kripke Enterprises; Wonderland Sound and Vision; Warner Bros. Television)

BEST EDITOR ‐ SHORT FORM

Ellen Datlow
John Joseph Adams
Neil Clarke
Jerry Pournelle
Sheila Williams

BEST EDITOR ‐ LONG FORM 

Sheila E. Gilbert
Liz Gorinsky
Jim Minz
Toni Weisskopf
Vox Day

BEST PROFESSIONAL ARTIST 

Abigail Larson
Lars Braad Andersen
Larry Elmore
Michal Karcz
Larry Rostant

BEST SEMIPROZINE

Uncanny Magazine edited by Edited by Lynne M. Thomas & Michael Damian Thomas, Michi Trota, and Erika Ensign & Steven Schapansky
Beneath Ceaseless Skies edited by Scott Andrews, Nicole Lavigne, and Kate Marshall
Daily Science Fiction edited by Michele‐Lee Barasso and Jonathan Laden
Sci Phi Journal edited by Jason Rennie
Strange Horizons edited by Catherine Krahe, Julia Rios, J. Odasso, Vanessa Rose Phin, Maureen Kincaid Speller, and theStrange Horizons staff

BEST FANZINE 

“File 770” edited by Mike Glyer
“Castalia House Blog” edited by Jeffro Johnson
“Lady Business” edited by Clare, Ira, Jodie, KJ, Renay, and Susan
“Superversive SF” edited by Jason Rennie
“Tangent Online” edited by Dave Truesdale

BEST FANCAST 

No Award
8‐4 Play, Mark MacDonald, John Ricciardi, Hiroko Minamoto, and Justin Epperson
Cane and Rinse, Cane and Rinse
HelloGreedo, HelloGreedo
The Rageaholic, RazörFist
Tales to Terrify, Stephen Kilpatrick

BEST FAN WRITER

Mike Glyer
Douglas Ernst
Morgan Holmes
Jeffro Johnson
Shamus Young

BEST FAN ARTIST 

Steve Stiles
Matthew Callahan
disse86
Kukuruyo
Christian Quinot

JOHN W. CAMPBELL AWARD FOR BEST NEW WRITER 

Andy Weir *
Pierce Brown *
Sebastien de Castell *
Brian Niemeier
Alyssa Wong *
* Finalists in their 2nd year of eligibility.

FOREST J. ACKERMAN AWARD

Joe Siclari & Evie Stern



0 Comments on And The Award Goes To... Hugo Awards 2016 as of 8/26/2016 8:23:00 PM
Add a Comment
4. Got Milk?

I saw an ad for a brand-new fridge.
It made me jealous - just a smidge,
For every time its doors do close
(Which happens often, I suppose),

It snaps a photo, which is sent
Right to your phone and it is meant
To help you out when at the store
In case your memory is poor.

You low on milk? Your butter gone?
Your cheese used up? Rely upon
Your phone and fridge to let you know
The aisles to which you need to go.

A written list? That's so passe.
Technology will lead the way
And take us to the very brink
Of where we'll never have to think.

0 Comments on Got Milk? as of 8/26/2016 3:29:00 PM
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5. FALSE INSTAGRAM ACCOUNT ALERT

A very kind reader brought something urgent to my attention today. Someone has created an instagram account for Print & Pattern that is not by me. They are posting pictures from this blog but not crediting any of the artists. Something I would never do. I would urge anyone following this account just because they believe it to be officially by the Print & Pattern Blog to unfollow it now, and if

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6. Testament of Youth

Testament of Youth. Vera Brittain. 1933. 688 pages. [Source: Library]

First sentence: When the Great War broke out, it came to me not as a superlative tragedy, but as an interruption of the most exasperating kind to my personal plans.

Premise/plot: In 1933, Vera Brittain published her autobiography, Testament of Youth, which covers the years 1900 to 1925. Much of the book focuses directly on the Great War (aka World War I) and its immediate aftermath. During the war, Vera Brittain left her university studies (Somerville College, Oxford) and became a nurse (V.A.D.). She worked as a nurse in England and abroad. (I believe she nursed in France and Malta.) Many of her friends actively served during the war. And those closest to her--including a brother and a fiance--were killed. She wrote honestly and openly about how brutal and devastating the war was, about how the war changed her and there was no going back after peace was declared.

When the book is not discussing the war, it often turns to education, politics, and social issues. Vera Brittain definitely was a feminist. She had VERY strong opinions on women's rights. But she didn't just speak out and speak up about women. She also was a voice for the poor and working class. She saw a lot of injustice and wanted to change the world.

Vera Brittain loved to be a lecturer or guest-lecturer. She had a LOT to say, and wanted to be HEARD wherever she went. This wasn't always the case. She was unhappy with certain groups--or clubs--that didn't value women's opinions and treat women as intellectual equals.

Also of interest perhaps, Brittain shares her experiences as a writer--her journey to publication and her thoughts on the literary world.

The very last chapter is a relief--after spending so many chapters distancing herself from humanity by focusing on POLITICS and WORLD AFFAIRS--focuses instead on her deep friendships and ultimate marriage. She struggled a lot with the idea of marriage. Can she marry and still be a feminist? Can she marry even though she has every intention of staying a career woman? Can she marry even though children are the very last thing (almost) on her mind? She spent so long speaking out against marriage and traditional roles for women, that she is almost ashamed and embarrassed that she fell in love.

My thoughts: It was REALLY long. Overall, I thought it was slightly uneven. It was at times quite fascinating and compelling, but, then at times it was also quite sluggish and boring. There would be pages that definitely kept me reading and kept me caring. I will say that the movie did a great job condensing the book and capturing the spirit of it. Not that the movie is 100% faithful to the book. (No movie is).

Quotes:
There is still, I think, not enough recognition by teachers of the fact that the desire to think--which is fundamentally a moral problem--but be induced before the power is developed. Most people, whether men or women, wish above all else to be comfortable, and thought is a pre-eminently uncomfortable process; it brings to the individual far more suffering than happiness in a semi-civilized world which still goes to war, still encourages the production of unwanted C3 children by exhausted mothers, and still compels married partners who hate one another to live together in the name of morality. (40)
I am inclined to believe that provincial dances are responsible for more misery than any other commonplace experience. (51)
Most of us have to be self-righteous before we can be righteous. (56)
How curious it seems that letters are so much less vulnerable than their writers! (124)
Even my work-driven uncle at the bank wrote a long letter, enclosing a fragment of philosophy which had recently come to England from the French trenches: "When you are a soldier you are one of two things, either at the front or behind the lines. If you are behind the lines you need not worry. If you are at the front you are one of two things. You are either in a danger zone or in a zone which is not dangerous. If you are in a zone which is not dangerous you need not worry. If you are in a danger zone, you are one of two things; either you are wounded or you are not. If you are not wounded you need not worry. If you are wounded you are one of two things, either seriously wounded or slightly wounded. If you are slightly wounded you need not worry. If you are seriously wounded one of two things is certain--either you get well or you die. If you get well you needn't worry. If you die you cannot worry, so there is no need to worry about anything at all." (306)
It seems to me that the War will make a big division of 'before' and 'after' in the history of the world. (317)


© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

0 Comments on Testament of Youth as of 8/26/2016 4:07:00 PM
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7. ओ मांझी रे – सिस्टम और समाज को बदल डालो

ओ मांझी रे – सिस्टम और समाज को बदल डालो दशरथ मांझी बनाम दाना मांझी चाहे मांझी हो या मांझा… सिस्टम के लिए बहुत बडी चुनौती है. Its right time to wake up ..आज अचानक फेसबुक facebook memories को देखा तो पिछ्ले साल की बात याद आ गई. तब  मांझी का नाम सुर्खियों मे था. दशरथ मांझी […]

The post ओ मांझी रे – सिस्टम और समाज को बदल डालो appeared first on Monica Gupta.

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8. My tweets

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9. Cartoon – Helping hands are better

Cartoon – Helping hands are better helping hands are better than praying lips …मदद करने वाले हाथ  प्रार्थना करने वाले होंठो से अच्छे होते हैं… पिछ्ले दिनों एक खबर ने बहुत विचलित कर दिया जिसमें असपताल  से एम्बूलैंस की  सुविधा न मिलने पर ओडिसा का गरीब दाना मांझी अपनी मृतक पत्नी का शव कन्धे पर […]

The post Cartoon – Helping hands are better appeared first on Monica Gupta.

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10. खाने के सही कॉम्बिनेशंस की जानकारी

खाने के सही कॉम्बिनेशंस की जानकारी Information of right food combinations.  Healthy diet या खाना क्या खाऎ. उससे भी ज्यादा जरुरी है कि क्या चीज किसके साथ खाई जाए ताकि नुकसान न करे… आज मणि बता रही थी कि थायराइड के मरीजों सोया प्रोडक्ट्स, फूलगोभी, ब्रोकली एवं पत्ता गोभी नही खानी चाहिए. मेरे लिए जानकारी […]

The post खाने के सही कॉम्बिनेशंस की जानकारी appeared first on Monica Gupta.

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11. An Interview With Anna Ciddor



Early in 2016, I wrote an informal review of The Family With Two Front Doors by Anna Ciddor, a novel based on the childhood of the author's grandmother, who appears as the ten year old heroine of this book. It's set in the 1920s, but it certainly appealed to my mother, who was growing up in Poland in the 1930s, and she is currently re-reading the book, which she says takes her right back to her own childhood. She did quite a lot of things little Nomi does, although her family wasn't a rabbi's family, and the small-town flavour was very similar. 

But I've read all of Anna Ciddor's fiction, so when she kindly agreed to be interviewed for The Zgreat Raven, I couldn't resist adding questions about her other work. 

Anna, welcome to The Great Raven! 

SB: 

What was your first book? The first one I read was your history of toilets in Allen and Unwin's True Stories series, but I think you were writing education books before that. Anything before the education books

AC: 

My first book was a picture book called ‘Take Me Back’ which was published in 1988. It was inspired by Australia’s bicentenary celebrations (for the arrival of white settlers). I realised these celebrations would be meaningless to children unless they could see how life in Australia had changed over those 200 years so I created a book that gave a snapshot of home life for each generation from 1788 to 1988. 

SB: 

The Viking Magic books were delightful, set in a small Scandinavian community with two children who had been exchanged at birth. Would you like to tell us a bit about it and how you got the idea for it?




AC: 

When I did some research about Vikings for a little non-fiction reader, I discovered there was a lot more to these horned-helmet wearers than dragonships and raiders (and I found out that they didn’t really wear horned helmets at all!) Viking lives were dominated by a belief in magic. They thought there were little folk who lived underground and had to be appeased with gifts of food. They feared neighbours might be witches who could cast spells on them. And then, I discovered that if a Viking family didn’t want a newborn baby, they were allowed to dispose of it by leaving it for the wolves! Well, that was it. The idea for the series was born! I came up with the idea of a midwife secretly swapping an unwanted girl-baby for a boy born at the same time. This then set up the wonderful storyline of two children, Oddo and Thora, growing up in families where they didn’t fit in. 
It was great fun writing Runestone, Wolfspell and Stormriders, because every time I got stuck, I researched more about Vikings, and discovered some other wonderful truth I could use in the stories. 



SB: 

You wrote a book in the Quentaris series, Prisoner of Quentaris, in which your leprechauns formed a small copy of heroic Irish society instead of the cliched cutesy leprechauns of most fiction - what gave you that idea?





AC: 

When I was approached to contribute to the Quentaris series, I was immersed in research for Night of the Fifth Moon, a novel set in Ireland during the fifth century – in the time of druids, kings and battles. I decided to write a variation on an old Irish folktale from that period. In Prisoner of Quentaris, the king of the leprechauns is captured by humans and the little leprechauns have to work out how to free him. I asked students in schools I visited to give me ideas how they might achieve this, and I actually used some of their suggestions in the novel. 



SB: 

There is a gentle humour in all your fiction,  even in The Family With Two Front Doors, which is based on the true story of your grandmother's childhood - is this deliberate on your part or is it just you?

AC: 

A bit of both. I am always alert for humour in any setting or situation I am writing about. As a reader, I appreciate humour and the way it brightens a book, so I always want to include it in my writing.

SB: 

You mentioned at the Jewish Writers' Festival that this novel took you five years to research and write. Can you tell us a bit about what was involved? Mostly, my research involves reading lots of books and following up anything I can't find by going online. I suspect your process was a lot more complex!
AC: 

The book was inspired by interviews with my grandmother from twenty-five years ago. However, when I sat down to write it in 2011, I discovered some crucial holes in my information, and sadly, Nana Nomi was no longer around to answer my questions. That was what set me off on my five-year quest. Like you, I researched as much as I could in books and on-line, but these were not enough. I wanted to bring back to life the intimate everyday details of a lost lifestyle from 1920s Poland and also the characters of the eleven members of Nana’s family. 

I pored over the half dozen family photos that had come down to me, trying to guess personalities from solemn sepia images taken so long ago. I reread over and over again the little anecdotes my Nana had told me – each time noticing some nuance or particular I had overlooked before. I interviewed other elderly people who had lived in Poland at that time, and I asked rabbis for details of Jewish rituals and customs. Finally, I travelled across the world to Poland. I hunted in museums, I searched old archives for family documents, but most importantly of all, I found the apartment block where my Nana’s family lived. I opened the big wrought iron gate and ventured into the courtyard. I walked the street outside, following the footpath they must have trodden, and bought a banana in the market where they shopped. By the time I had finished all my research and written the book, I felt I really had known that long-ago family. 

And by the time I'd read the book, I felt that I, too, had known that family! 

Thanks for answering, Anna! 

If you'd like to get hold of this book or any of the others here are some places where you can get them: 



 https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_c_3_11?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=anna+ciddor&sprefix=Anna+Ciddor%2Caps%2C494

Or there's Booktopia, where I've put in a link to the ebook versions:

http://www.booktopia.com.au/search.ep?pn=1&productType=917504&keywords=anna+ciddor&suggested=L&list=8

Book Depository has some and for others suggests AbeBooks, as they're out of print.

https://www.bookdepository.com/search?searchTerm=Anna+Ciddor&search=Find+book





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12. busy little bee....

these last couple of weeks. working on multiple paintings at once. and that's just the way i like it. :)


for starters, i finally got around to finishing up this little red head beauty. along with some blue poppies, this is one of my favorites. i worked on a 4"x12" canvas...an odd size for me but i wanted to challenge myself, combustion wise. really liking the way it turned out. plus, it included two of my favorite things...red heads and blue poppies. rare beauties, indeed. i'll be sharing the finished piece next week. prints will be available then as well.

also, i've been thinking about doing a small series of mixed media animals for quite a bit. i have SO many art supplies in my home/studio well, it's like Michael's, AC Moore and Dick Blick in on humble little abode. from scrapbook papers to every kind of pencil/paint/pastel known to man....i figured it was time to stop staring at all of them and DO SOMETHING with them. below are some sneak peeks....



hopefully, emerging from all this creative chaos will be a cute series of fall themed animals. stay tuned....

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13. Presidential Polar Bear Post Card Project No. 212 - 8.26.16


It's National Dog Day at the Polar Bear Post Card Project -- and thusly the Alaskan Husky, working dog of the far Arctic north, makes an appearance with the requisite bear! Like the polar bear, these animals are uniquely suited to their environment and the working conditions of Arctic living. Congratulations and 'thank you' to President Obama for his two recent national monument designations in Maine and Hawaii. We hope indeed that the table is set for the 1002 and a similar designation later this fall #WeAreTheArctic #NationalDogDay

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14. Ten underappreciated philosophers of the Islamic World [timeline]

In this timeline, Peter Adamson, author of the History of Philosophy series, highlights ten underappreciated figures of the Islamic world, during and well beyond the medieval era.

The post Ten underappreciated philosophers of the Islamic World [timeline] appeared first on OUPblog.

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15. Back to School - But Not for Me

This is the first week of school for the University of Colorado, where I taught for 22 years as a tenured professor in the Philosophy Department. It's the first week of school for DePauw University, where I taught as a visiting professor for six blissful semesters over the course of the last five years. It's the first full week of the new school year at Boulder Valley Public Schools, where both of my boys were educated from kindergarten to high school graduation. My two-and-a-half-year old granddaughter, Kataleya, had her first day at Sunflower Preschool yesterday (and our feverishly undertaken potty training held up under the stress!).

But it's not the first week of school for me.

Instead I've spent the week savoring every minute of a visit from a high school friend from New Jersey - actually, a friend from first grade on. In third grade, when I acquired the inevitable cereal-company-inspired nickname of General Mills, I founded an army to chase the boys at recess. Kim was the army's only other member, my reluctant but obliging private. For the last decade or so, we've enjoyed annual visits, me returning to New Jersey to connect with her when I was there for various writing-related events, she flying to Colorado for time in the mountains. On this visit, we spent one day at the Denver Botanic Gardens, one day at the "Women of Abstract Expressionism" and "Rhythm and Roots" exhibits at the Denver Art Museum (both excellent), and one day, the best day, up in Rocky Mountain National Park. What could be more fun than that?

And yet . . . it feels strange not to be going back to school myself, to be playing while others are working, wandering past paintings and waterfalls while others are finalizing syllabi and welcoming students. Maybe I really truly am retired now?

No. My own "back-to-school" frenzy will be observed the week after Labor Day, which is actually when school should begin, the way it always did when I was growing up in New Jersey (and where it still does, I believe, on most of the East Coast). That will the week of Kataleya's official start to preschool. That will be the week I leap into productivity as a full-time writer.

I will work hard on my new chapter book series idea, my THIRD this year, rebounding energetically and enthusiastically from my publisher's rejection of ideas number one and number two. I will revise and expand several scholarly children's literature articles and ready at least one and preferably two to submit for publication. I will read up a storm as a member of the Children's Literature Association's Phoenix Award Committee, which gives an award for a children's book published 20 years ago that did not receive a major award in its year of original publication but deserves one now.

So I am definitely going back to school, or at least back to work, on the day after Labor Day. There is still time for me to buy myself some new school supplies! There is still time to put on a red plaid jumper! And to sharpen pencils, and organize notebooks, and make "new school year" goals. Summer is lasting a bit longer for me this year than for my friends and neighbors, but in two more weeks, I'll be ready for the best school year ever.

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16. Olympic swimmers meet Latin America’s vast gray area of private security

During the closing week of the Rio games, the biggest story was not about the pool, the mat, or the track but rather about the after-game party . . . and the after-party mess. As of Friday morning, the next-to-last day of the games, the home page of the New York Times was carrying headlines for five separate articles concerning the event. Clearly, the events that unfolded when the swimmers arrived at the gas station as well as the interviews given by American medalist Ryan Lochte, fit some powerful stereotypes about Brazilian (in)security and American hedonism and hubris.

The post Olympic swimmers meet Latin America’s vast gray area of private security appeared first on OUPblog.

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17. cornell collective podcast

Hey, I was in a podcast with Margaret Dunlap, Paul Cornell and John Scalzi (edited by Dave Probert from Geek Planet Online)! You can listen to us chat about what we do over on the Cornell Collective website.

Cornell Collective

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18. Dazzle Ships Poetry Reading

Jane Yolen came in town the other day to participate in a reading of poems about Dazzle Ships. I mentioned Dazzle Ships in another blog post...

     Ships were painted like this during WWI (maybe also during WWII) to throw off locators trying to figure out which direction or how fast ships were going. This one was recently commissioned by artist Ciara Phillips for the Edinburgh Arts Festival, as was the poetry reading about Dazzle Ships hosted by Marjorie Lotfi Gill of Open Book at the Edinburgh Bookshop.
     Two wonderful things together, Jane and the Edinburgh Bookshop, we were so there! (And Jane got us guest tickets - yay!) Here was the program, a limited edition risograph printing by Out of the Blueprint:
The poems took on several different angles and moods. I especially liked the one about the women who painted the ships (yes, they were all women), who were able to get out of the house and wear trousers for the first time! Jane's poem was also wonderful, of course.
     Factoid: Did you know that she shares a poem every day via email? You can sign up HERE.
      What a fun evening!

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19. Swiss Oscar Contender ‘Ma Vie de Courgette’ Unveils English-Subbed Trailer

A big hit at Cannes and Annecy, the Oscar-contending "Ma Vie de Courgette" now has an English-subbed trailer.

The post Swiss Oscar Contender ‘Ma Vie de Courgette’ Unveils English-Subbed Trailer appeared first on Cartoon Brew.

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20. Children's Book Review of Pumpkin Patch Blessings and a Giveaway!

by Sally Matheny

Pumpkin Patch Blessings
Are you looking forward to autumn? I saw an eager, yellow leaf parachuting from a tree yesterday. The apples are almost ripe for picking, and soon the pumpkins will follow. In anticipation of the refreshingly cool air, I’m reviewing a children’s book, Pumpkin Patch Blessings, today. Also, someone will receive a blessing and win a free copy of the book!

Pumpkin Patch Blessings, written by Kim Washburn and illustrated by Jacqueline East, is published by Zonderkidz.

Soft lines and colors fill this fourteen-page, board book. Children will take delight scouring the pages for illustrations of God’s creations—plants, animals, and people. On most pages, there is a dog and a bunny. Children will enjoy searching for them throughout the book.

The story centers around two children visiting a pumpkin farm. Through the story, readers” hear” the crunch of the leaves, “smell and taste” roasted corn on the cob, and “feel” the multi-textures of pumpkins. The rhyming verses recount many more sensory experiences before ending with pumpkin pies at home.

Another feature of the book I liked was the inclusion of more than one ethnic group in the book. 

One additional note, two jack-o-lanterns are inserted on the last page. Nothing in the book mentions, or alludes to, Halloween or jack-o-lanterns. In fact, the whole book focuses on God’s creation. Nonetheless, two small jack-o-lanterns nestle in among the rest of the pumpkins on the last page. Some pumpkins are plain. Others have carved-out circles and shapes with light shining through. 

Overall, children will enjoy this beautiful book. The rich vocabulary makes it a wonderful book for ages 4-6. The durable design and colorful illustrations provide an entertaining book for younger children as well.

Who would like to win this book?

*All you have to do is tell us what part of God’s creation do you enjoy the most during the autumn season. We will announce the winner on Sept. 2!



Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255




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21. खाना खाने के तरीके

खाना खाने के तरीके Diet tips या खाने के तरीके हम जहांं भी पढते हैं सतर्क हो जाते हैं पर खाना खाने के और खाना  digest करने के तरीके ऐसे कभी नही पढे होंगें .. आज जब अपनी सहेली मणि के घर किसी काम से गई तो परेशान थी कि खाना कैसे खाऊं… ओह… मैने […]

The post खाना खाने के तरीके appeared first on Monica Gupta.

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22. Writing Through the Hard Parts

How can we teach our students to trust the writing process?

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23. Cover Art!


Always exciting to see the final cover come together on a new project! And in this case, my first board book with the good folks at Sasquatch's Little Bigfoot imprint. On sale in February 2017!

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24. Happy News For Angry Birds: A Sequel Is Being Planned

More Angry Birds is on the way!

The post Happy News For Angry Birds: A Sequel Is Being Planned appeared first on Cartoon Brew.

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25. Pasadena Loves YA 2016

Hi everyone! Just popping in for a quick post about Pasadena Loves YA. Our friend Jane Gov who is the teen librarian at Pasadena Public Library (Central Branch) has organized this event for the past couple of years, and we're really looking forward to seeing everyone there again!

What: Pasadena Loves YA is a free teen book festival presented by Pasadena Public Library

Where: Pasadena Public Library - Central Branch, 285 E Walnut St, Pasadena, CA 91101

When: Saturday, Sept 17, 2016 from 12-4 pm. First 300 attendees get free tote bags, so get there early!

What: Meet 19 young adult authors, listen to panels speak about various topics, and get your books signed! Book sales by Vroman's Bookstore. Helping hands provided by Bridge to Books. Find out more at pasadenateenbookfestival.com and follow @pasadenalovesya on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook! No ticket is necessary but we'd love it if you could RSVP here. The official hashtag = #plya16 (you can also tag = #pasadenalovesya)

Who:

Josephine Angelini (Witch's Pyre)
Frank Beddor (Crossfire)
Elizabeth Briggs (Future Shock)
Julie Buxbaum (Tell Me Three Things)
Cecil Castellucci (Stone in the Sky)
Tobie Easton (Emerge)
Dana Elmendorf (South of Sunshine)
Charlotte Huang (Going Geek)
Kerry Kletter (The First Time She Drowned)
Eric Laster (#Static)
Aija Mayrock (The Survival Guide to Bullying)
Shannon Messenger (Let the WInd Rise)
Marisa Reichardt (Underwater)
Robin Reul (My Kind of Crazy)
Robyn Schneider (Extraordinary Means)
Evelyn Skye (The Crown's Game)
Ingrid Sundberg (All We Left Behind)
Thomas Voorhies (The Giant)
Nicola Yoon (Everything Everything)

What a lineup, right? There will be giveaways and some refreshments, too!

Just a few pointers:

  • Parking - Parking can get a little hairy! There's metered parking on the street and a time limit on the lot, but if you park next door at University of Phoenix you should be fine (and it's covered!). Just don't park in any reserved spaces. There are also 2 public parking lots in walking distance. 
  • Books - You may bring books from home. Is there a title you can't live without? Better bring it--Vroman's will have the latest from each author, but supplies will be limited. Of course, supporting our indie bookstore partner with purchases will be greatly appreciated, and will help ensure they'll be back next year with more books!
  • Food - There aren't any places to buy food in the library during the event, and while there are sometimes refreshments, we tend to run out. We highly recommend bringing a picnic lunch, snacks to munch, and something to drink (coffeeholics, I'm looking at you! the nearest Starbucks is at the Paseo Colorado). You can also eat in most of the spaces such as the auditorium, the story room, and the patio--just make sure to keep the library clean!
  • Autographs - Signings and panels will be in the same room--you should be able to listen to the next panel while waiting in the signing line. We will have volunteers armed with Post-Its and Sharpies if you want your book personalized.
  • Tickets - No tickets are necessary, but we'd be grateful if you would RSVP at the Facebook event listing. It would also be awesome if you could share the post with your friends!
  • Social Media - We'd love to see your photos and tweets on social media! Make sure you tag them #plya16 and #pasadenalovesya so they make it to both this year's and the continuing tag feeds. We'll be publishing a quick guide to all of the authors' Instagram and Twitter handles next week, along with the schedule, so you can plan your day!

Any more questions? Head over to pasadenateenbookfestival.com or message pasadenateenbookfest at gmail dot com. We'll do our best to provide answers!

See you on September 17th!

~Alethea

(cross-posted at Kid Lit Frenzy)

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