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1. MIKE PLOOG

via Garret's Drawing A Day Blog http://ift.tt/2be1Ve5

MikePloog: MissingPiece




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2. Preston Blair

via Garret's Drawing A Day Blog http://ift.tt/2bdvahd





 Preston Blair’s Animation (Book 1) is the best “how to” book on cartoon animation ever published. When Blair put the book together in 1947, he used the characters he had animated at Disney and MGM to illustrate the various basic principles of animation. Apparently, the rights to use some of the characters were revoked after the book was already in the stores. Publication was halted for a time, and he was forced to redraw most of the MGM characters, replacing them with generic characters of his own design. The revised edition went on to become a classic, and the first edition was forgotten.





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3. Jean-Baptiste Monge

via Garret's Drawing A Day Blog http://ift.tt/2bdvw7C


Jean-Baptiste Monge





 

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4. Albert Dorne

via Garret's Drawing A Day Blog http://ift.tt/2bbeFbq


 
Famous Artists Course, 1954 edition 





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5. Cartoon Tips from the 1930s

via Gurney Journey http://ift.tt/2b9D37z

Cartoonist Bill Nolan (1896-1954) helped to create the classic rubber hose style of animation when he worked along with Otto Messmer on the Felix the Cat cartoons. 


In 1936, he wrote a little book called Cartooning Self-Taught, which presents the 1930s style.  The heads, hands, and body shapes are based on circles—or really spheres. The pupils are tall pie-cut ovals.

Men's feet are big and clown-like, with a low instep and a balloon toe. Each type of character should have a distinctive shoe: "A tramp needs tattered footwear; a dude requires shoes with spats; a farmer, boots."

Arms and legs get thicker as they go away from the body. Darks are shaded with parallel curving strokes. Poses are extreme and dynamic. Nolan says, "Comics are much more interesting if they seem to be doing something rather than remaining stationary." 

Characters can be created by using circles of different sizes. I like the angry cook with the elbows forward, the fat tycoon, and the cop swinging his billy club.


The dog, bear, and cat are doing a gait called a rack or pace, where both right legs move in tandem and both left legs move in tandem.

An assortment of animals "are all made from combinations of circles," he says. "There is no end to what you can do if you get firmly fixed in your mind the idea of building comics from the basic circles."

You can see the influence not only on the early Disney animators, but also on illustrators like R. Crumb and Dr. Seuss.

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6. Picked up a new sketchbook and look was inside! #animalpeople...


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7. Moran's Yellowstone Watercolors

via Paint Watercolor Create http://ift.tt/2aSTaLp

Capturing Nature

moran_grand_canyon_of_yellowstone.jpg
Thomas Moran, Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, watercolor on paper, 1895, Amon Carter Museum of the American Art, Fort Worth, TX

It is interesting to think about ways that art has changed the world. Thomas Moran, along with William Henry Jackson, is an artist who brought attention to the Yellowstone region.  His art ultimately led to the conservation of the land and its dedication as a national park.  For many years tales had been told of the unusual region, but it was the art that convinced congress to act. Yellowstone was set aside as the world's first national park in 1872. It took a few years to establish an organization to oversee the parks (others were created in the following years- Yosemite, Crater Lake, Mount Rainier among others.) This year marks the 100th year anniversary of the national park service. Please enjoy some of Thomas Moran's watercolor sketches of Yellowstone.

Cinnabar Mountain, Yellowstone River (watercolour) - Moran Thomas
Thomas Moran, Cinnabar Mountain, Yellowstone River, watercolor on paper, 1871, Yellowstone National Park

The Great Blue Spring of the Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone, by Thomas Moran/Library of Congress.
Thomas Moran, The Great Blue Spring of the Lower Geyser Basin, Library of Congress Washington, DC

Moran watercolor of Castle Geyser
Thomas Moran, The Castle Geyser in the Upper Geyser Basin, watercolor on paper, 1871, Yellowstone National Park

File:Thomas Moran - Above Tower Falls, Yellowstone.jpg
Thomas Moran, Above Tower Falls, watercolor and gouache on paper, 1871, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC


Thomas Moran, The Yellowstone Range from near Fort Ellis, watercolor on paper, 1871, Yellowstone National Park



Thomas Moran, In the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, watercolor on paper, July 1871, National Park Service

Thomas Moran, The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, watercolor on paper, 1872, Gilcrease Museum, Tulsa, OK

I'll end with a few pictures of mine from a recent Yellowstone visit.  I am looking forward to creating some watercolors inspired by my time at Yellowstone and these photos.
Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone

Hayden Valley

Grand Prismatic Spring


Cistern Spring

Old Faithful

Old Faithful

Castle Geyser

Find more of Moran's work here.
Read part of Moran's journal from his time at Yellowstone.

Do you have a favorite park?

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8. more t.s.sullivant

via One1more2time3's Weblog http://ift.tt/2ax2Uvs

sullivant 19992

another rare SULLIVANT masterpiece in color

© sullivant


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9. PREVIEW FOR PROCESS VIDEO

via mega-tran http://ift.tt/2aop8Lb

A preview of the process video that will be available for download on Monday, Aug. 1st. You can pay what you want per download with a minimum of $1 USD ($2 for international/outside of United States).

Soon to be available at http://ift.tt/2aoopcW.

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10. Nicole Gustafsson

via Lines and Colors :: a blog about drawing, painting, illustration, comics, concept art and other visual arts http://ift.tt/2arbSHD

Nicole Gustafsson, illustration
Nicole Gustafsson is an illustrator based in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. whose richly colored images of enchanted forests lit by glowing prisms are painted in traditional media — often Acryla Gouache and ink on wood panels.

Gustafsson utilizes a light touch with her linework, allowing her colors to carry the primary definition of her forms, and inviting the viewer into her compositions with contrasts of hue and value.

The gallery on her website is divided into subject matter, and her blog offers additional pieces, works in progress, announcements of shows and images of her work in situ, in which it is easier to see the realationship of the painted image to the base. Often areas of the wood are left open around the outside of the image.

[Via The Verge]

 
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11. A sketch from one of our late nights at the @illustrationmfa...


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12. Sargent's Watercolor Mountains

via Paint Watercolor Create http://ift.tt/28R5g4G

The Mountains are Calling


John Singer Sargent, Majorca, watercolor over pencil on paper, 1908, Private Collection

Hearing the call of the mountains led to today's post.  While I'm not among the mountains, I can gaze upon images of them (Sargent's) and scheme.  John Singer Sargent traveled though mountains in multiple
 countries and brought sketchbooks along.  I am looking forward to some time in the mountains, although not in the Swiss Alps, Dolomites or Spain, with my watercolors as well.  I hope to learn from Sargent's layering of similar hues, his loose brushwork, and white areas left untouched. 

John Singer Sargent, Mount Cervin, Alps, watercolor and gouache over pencil on paper, 1905, Private Collection

John Singer Sargent - Open Valley, Dolomites:
John Singer Sargent, Open Valley, Dolomites, watercolor and gouache on paper, c.1913-14, Metropolitian Museum of Art, New York


John Singer Sargent, Switzerland 1869 Sketchbook, Metropolitian Museum of Art, New York

John Singer Sargent (American, 1856–1925). Bay of Uri, Brunnen (from Switzerland 1870 Sketchbook),June 4, 1870. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of Mrs. Francis Ormond, 1950 (50.130.148l) #snow:
John Singer Sargent, Bay of Uri, Brunnen (from Switzerland 1870 Sketchbook,) watercolor, gouache and graphite on paper, 1870 Metropolitian Museum of Art, New York

John Singer Sargent - Snow:
John Singer Sargent, Snow, watercolor and graphite on paper, c.1909-1911, Metropolitian Museum of Art, New York

John Singer Sargent, Simplon Pass: Avalanche Track, 1911.:
John Singer Sargent, Simplon Pass, Avalanche Track, watercolor and opaque watercolor with wax resist over graphite on paper, c.1909-1911, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, MA


John Singer Sargent, In the Dolomites, watercolor and graphite on paper, 1914, Private Collection


Do you have a favorite mountain scene painted by Sargent?  What mountains do you like to paint?

Happy Trekking!

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13. Robin Hood. Illustrator Anne Yvonne Gilbert.

via Book Graphics http://ift.tt/28UAlX6

Anne Yvonne Gilbert. Robin Hood

Anne Yvonne Gilbert. Robin Hood
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Anne Yvonne Gilbert. Robin Hood
Anne Yvonne Gilbert. Robin Hood
Anne Yvonne Gilbert. Robin Hood
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Anne Yvonne Gilbert. Robin Hood
Anne Yvonne Gilbert. Robin Hood
Anne Yvonne Gilbert. Robin Hood
Anne Yvonne Gilbert. Robin Hood
Anne Yvonne Gilbert. Robin Hood
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Anne Yvonne Gilbert. Robin Hood
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Anne Yvonne Gilbert. Robin Hood
Anne Yvonne Gilbert. Robin Hood

Robin Hood by Nicky Raven.
ISBN 978-5-389-05778-4, 2014.
Illustrator Anne Yvonne Gilbert. 

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14. Update: Above The Timberline

via Muddy Colors http://ift.tt/28OZYsS


Greg Manchess

After a week at IMC with a fantastic roster of instructors and a bunch of wonderful illustration and gallery students, I’m back to painting away on Timberline. I had hoped to get a few started while there, but alas, the students come first, so I only used one to work on for a demo.

Tau

We had a great time talking paint together. I don’t think I’ve ever laughed as much through a painting demo. I shared how my mind works while laying down strokes. I think everyone was a little surprised and elated that things don’t always go as planned and I have to think on the fly. Just like they do. Just like I did when starting out, and still have to even now.


I’m about to hole up in Oregon for a full month of focused painting. I’ve got 60 more spreads to conquer to be finished. Not sure I can make it now, but the paint is feeling good, and so are the characters, shapes, values, light, scenes, etc.

Way station

My main characters have been shot for reference, and July will be spent painting most of them, including Mike Mignola, creator of Hellboy and guest instructor at IMC, playing the part of Sam.

I’m also beginning to refine some of the more complex visuals, like inside the Polaris Geographic Society and…beneath the lost city!

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15. WHEN THE WALKING LINE PAUSES

via ILLUSTRATION ART http://ift.tt/28ItUEu

Paul Klee famously said, "a line is a dot that went for a walk." 

 
But some lines deliberately stop along the way.  Let's consider why.

Paul Coker Jr.'s line pauses, digs down, then springs forward again. 

This gives his line additional energy,  as if it is propelled on its path by booster rockets.

Like Coker's line, Robert Fawcett's line here lingers at strategic spots on its walk:

 

Fawcett doesn't pause out of uncertainty.  Rather, he punctuates his line as a way of emphasizing his commitment.

Here we see Ronald Searle's line stopping, backing up, and digging in again like successive blows by a sculptor chiseling into stone: 


Searle's technique adds character and musculature to his line. 

Another good example is Mort Drucker's trademark bouncing line. 


Drucker's line loops around, bestowing a springiness that could never be achieved in lines that walk the shortest path between two points.

These lines all walk with a hesitation step.  They're very different from the flowing, sinuous line of artists such as Hirschfeld.
 

The mark left behind at these stopping points records the added pressure of a wrist and the increased flow of ink-- but mostly they remind viewers that an active brain has chosen to renew its commitment to a line at this precise spot.  They reveal a series of choices rather than a single choice.   They are the graphic equivalent of leaving behind a trail of exclamation marks.  

In the right hands, these choices can greatly increase the character and strength of a line. 

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16. Children’s Book Illustrations from British Library

via Lines and Colors :: a blog about drawing, painting, illustration, comics, concept art and other visual arts http://ift.tt/1TF4uFB

Children's Book Illustrations from British Library
As part of the huge trove of public domain images being posted on Flicker — which I reported in 2013 — the British Library has assemble a large collection of children’s book illustrations.

As is often the case with these kinds of large scale image resources, best results come from a bit of patience and digging.

Some of the illustrations are not directly attributed to the artists, but reference is given to the books from which they were taken.

[Via DCAD Library and Century Past History on Twitter]

 
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17. J. Bears Wilson’s face gets all screwed up when he’s...


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18. I didn’t want you guys to think that I only drew fuzzy...


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19. Ahab & The White Whale


via Emergent Ideas Ahab & The White Whale

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20. Ahab & The White Whale

Over the last few months I have been listening to the unabridged Blackstone Audio of Moby Dick. Along the way the story has seeped into my thoughts and drawings. I present to you some work that I made along the way. As it turns out, I am a little obsessed with illustrating stories. Hmm, perhaps there a […]

via Studio Bowes Art Blog at http://ift.tt/1rLX8sv

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21. Artist Spotlight: Sulamith Wülfing

via Muddy Colors http://ift.tt/24haKKF

by Cory Godbey


Back in December of 2015 I was exhibiting at an arts and crafts fair and I got to talking to this guy who stopped by my table. After a while he asks, "Hey, have you ever heard of an artist named Sulamith Wülfing?"

The question caught me a little by surprise (it's not everyday that people want to talk 20th century illustrators, let alone bring up artists I've only just recently begun to study) and I said of course and that she's become a "new" favorite of mine.

In fact, I'd been introduced to her work by Sam Guay only a few months prior. Honestly, I have no idea how I'd never heard of Sulamith Wülfing before that. Her work is right up my alley. It's haunting, magical, and speaks to this delicate, graceful otherworldliness.


The guy tells me that he deals in estate sales, specifically antique books, and that he just acquired this nearly 200 page book of her work. He goes on to say that if I'd like it, the book is mine. He wanted the book to go to someone who would appreciate it. Next thing I know the guy has left the show, gone to pick up the book, and brought it back for me.

Other than a handful of images online I'd not been able to track down any kind of collection of Wülfing's work and now here I am, thanks to kindness of this collector, holding a huge book with page after page of not only paintings and drawings but her complete biography (which just so happens to be as fascinating as the work itself).



Born in 1901, she had visions of angels, gnomes, fairies, and elves her entire life. Sulamith described them as incarnations of "kind-heartedness" and drew upon them as the inspiration for her work. She lived through both World Wars (and in fact she was told by Joseph Goebbels that her illustrations were unacceptable and that she must stop; she refused).








"What I believe in absolutely, however, is the immortality of the soul, the primeval personality which has still much unfolding and further developments before it. How this happens and how it has happened, that remains - in any case at this moment - a secret."
 Sulamith Wülfing, 1901 - 1988.

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22. RINGO'S TEETH AND STAN LEE'S FINGERS

via ILLUSTRATION ART http://ift.tt/1Uk5cMD

Regular readers know that I'm a big fan of Tom Fluharty's sketches.


In an era when quality drawing is under-appreciated, Fluharty's strong, bold, insightful drawings stand out.

So I was particularly pleased when Fluharty announced the release of his splendid new collection of drawings, The Art of the Sketch.  Looking through Fluharty's book, several lessons stand out.

I love this drawing of Ringo Starr:


It looks like it was drawn quickly, like the crack of a whip.  Yet if you look more closely, you note that he paid attention to-- and drew-- each and every tooth individually. 



You don't notice such details at first because Fluharty has the gift to capture them with a vigorous, energetic scribble rather than the painful cross hatching or stippling that many meticulous draftsmen use to capture details. 

The point is not that Fluharty makes highly detailed drawings-- to the contrary, he often ignores major details.

The point is that Fluharty notices such details; when Fluharty has a pencil in his hand, not one feather falls from a sparrow unnoticed.  And from that wealth of observations, he judiciously selects the details he thinks are important.  In the drawing of Ringo,  that smile is the centerpiece and Fluharty apparently felt that those ungainly teeth were worth the additional effort.  We may not be conscious of them, but such details contribute a lot.

You see similar attention in this more finished drawing of Stan Lee.

 

Look at how much imagination Fluharty has invested in those gnarled old fingers still striking the "spidey" pose: 
 

Or check out the wringing hands in this drawing of Hillary Clinton...



In both cases, you can tell that Fluharty decided that hands would be an important part of the story, and went back to add them to his drawing.

This is a fine collection of working drawings, and one that I enjoyed thoroughly.



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23. 2016 Spectrum Award Winners

via Muddy Colors http://ift.tt/1T0ang9

This past Saturday was the presentation of this year's Spectrum Award Winners. The event was held at the Society of Illustrators in New York City. Every nomination was sincerely spectacular, but a special congratulations, to the award winners.

This year's medal winners are:



ADVERTISING


Gold Award
Nico Delort/"The Blessing of Athena”

Silver Award
Joseph Qiu/"24 Hour Movie Marathon"



BOOK


Gold Award
Rovina Cai/"Tom, Thom"

Silver Award
Karla Ortiz/"Sorcerer of the Wildeeps"



COMIC


Gold Award
Daren Bader/"Tribes of Kai, page 41”

Silver Award
Nic Klein/“Drifter"



CONCEPT ART


Gold Award
Vance Kovacs/"King Louie's Court"

Silver Award
Te Hu/"Journey to West"



DIMENSIONAL


Gold Award
Forest Rogers/"The Morrigan"

Silver Award
Te Hu/"Journey to West"



EDITORIAL


Gold Award
Tran Nguyen/"Traveling To a Distant Day"

Silver Award
Chris Seaman/"Family Portraithausen: A Tribute to Ray Harryhausen"



INSTITUTIONAL


Gold Award
Tyler Jacobson/"Exalted Angel"

Silver Award
Julie Bell/"Behind the Veil”



UNPUBLISHED


Gold Award
Rob Rey/“Bioluminescence"

Silver Award
Wayne Haag/"Dust Devil"



RISING STAR AWARD


Victor Maury



And last, but certainly not least...

The 2016 GRAND MASTER HONOREE is

MIKE MIGNOLA

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24. It’s like #Sherlock is reaching through the bottom of the...


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25. I felt like drawing #MerlHaggard. #sketch #pencil #rollingstone


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